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Archive for the ‘Pakistan’ Category

Player Profile(#47)…Danish Kaneria (Pakistan)

Posted by wildkiwi25 on January 21, 2009

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Danish Parabha Shanker Kaneria (Urdu: دانش پرابھا شنکر کنیریا) (born 16 December 1980), is a Pakistani cricketer (leg spin bowler). He was born in Karachi. He made his international debut in 2000 against England at Faisalabad. Kaneria has continued the tradition of Pakistani leg spin bowlers and possesses a very well disguised googly. However his failure to develop an effective straighter delivery has prevented him from reaching his full potential.

In January 2002, he took 7 wickets for 77 runs in the Test match against Bangladesh in Bangladesh, which are his career best figures so far in Test cricket. Earlier, in the same season, he had taken 6 wickets in an innings twice against Bangladesh during Bangladesh’s tour of Pakistan. In October 2004, he took 10 wickets against Sri Lanka at Karachi, with a second-innings haul of 7/109, setting up Pakistan’s 6-wicket win. More recently he has played an important role in Pakistan’s Test wins over West Indies, England and India.

In One Day International cricket, he has been economical so far with an economy rate under 4.8 runs per over. His best bowling in ODIs came against New Zealand in Sri Lanka in 2003. He also had a good series against Zimbabwe in Sharjah just before that. He also impressed in English county cricket taking 32 wickets in seven championship matches for Essex in 2005. Although unable to play English county cricket in 2006 due to Pakistan’s tour of England, it has been confirmed that Kaneria would return to play for Essex in 2007.

Success in the one day arena has been more elusive, Pakistan usually opting to play the two spinning all-rounders Shahid Afridi and Shoaib Malik instead.

Despite representing the Muslim-majority Country of Pakistan, Kaneria is a devout Hindu and is of Marwari heritage. He is only the second Hindu to play Test cricket for Pakistan (the first, his cousin Anil Dalpat, was briefly their wicketkeeper).

Kaneria suffered a broken finger in Essex’s LV County Championship Division Two match against Worcestershire at Colchester on August 21, 2008. The bowler was injured attempting to take a catch off Ben Smith. An X-ray confirmed he had broken a finger and may miss the remainder of the 2008 English domestic season.

Links to more information on Danish Kaneria:

  • Danish Kaneria on Cricinfo.com
  • Danish Kaneria Interview
  • Danish Kaneria’s Official site on BigStarCricket.com

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    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

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    Posted in Danish Kaneria, Danish Parabha Shanker Kaneria, Essex, Essex Eagles, Googly, Karachi, Leg Spinner, Pakistan, دانش پرابھا شنکر کنیریا | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#39)…Sohail Tanvir (Pakistan)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 14, 2008

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    Sohail Tanvir (born December 12, 1984 in Rawalpindi, Punjab) is a Pakistani cricketer. He created a name for himself in his early years as a street cricketer of Rawalpindi, and was known as “Sohail Kukree”.[citation needed]

    Domestic career:
    IPL career:
    On March 11, 2008, Tanvir was signed up in the second round of the Indian Premier League’s players’ auction by the Jaipur franchise, Rajasthan Royals, for $100,000.

    Playing in his third match of tournament, on May 4, Tanvir took a match-winning six wickets against the Chennai Super Kings at the Sawai Mansingh Stadium, Jaipur. His figures of 4-0-14-6 are a record for Twenty20 cricket. He ended the tournament as the highest wicket-taker, with 22 wickets from 11 matches at an average of 12.09, an economy rate of 6.46 and a strike rate of 11.20, the best among bowlers with more than six wickets.

    In the final of tournament, on June 1 at the Dr DY Patil Sports Academy in Mumbai, with Rajasthan chasing 164 to win, Tanvir added 21 runs along with captain Shane Warne. He hit the winning runs of the final ball of the innings, to see the Royals home. He was later presented with the “Purple Cap”, an award for the leading wicket-taker of the tournament.

    A statistical analysis conducted by Cricinfo after the conclusion of the league stage of the tournament rated Tanvir as the most successful player. He was also rated as the second best value player of the tournament, having been signed on for $100,000.

    International career:

    An allrounder, he is a hard-hitting left-handed batsman and left-arm fast-medium bowler who also bowls occasional left-arm orthodox spin. Despite not having taken a single wicket during his ten Twenty20 matches domestically, he was selected for Pakistan’s squad for the inaugral World Twenty20 after Shoaib Akhtar was sent home. He made his Twenty20 debut in the tournament, and took six wickets in six matches, with best bowling figures of 3 for 31 in four overs against Australia. Though considered an allrounder, Tanvir did not get a chance to bat in the tournament until the final, where he made his first international runs, with a six off his first ball, aiding Pakistan back into the game.

    After impressing in the ICC World Twenty20, he was selected to play in the ODI series against South Africa in October, 2007. He was then selected for the tour of India, and took eight wickets in the ODI series. He also took part in the Test series that followed, making his debut in place of the injured Umar Gul. On debut at the Feroz Shah Kotla in Dehli, he took three wickets which included Sourav Ganguly and Rahul Dravid. In Asia Cricket Cup, June 2008, Pakistan played their first game against Hong Kong at Karachi. In that match, Pakistan’s top order was badly ripped by Hong Kong bowlers before Sohail Tanvir set up a 100 run stand along with Fawad Alam for the 8th wicket. Sohail scored his maiden ODI 50 in that match. He scored 59 off just 55 balls which took Pakistan to a respectable score of 288. After that, in the match vs. Sri Lanka, Tanvir took his first 5 wickets haul. He ended at 5/48 in 10 overs.

    Links to more information on Sohail Tanvir:

  • Cricinfo.com Profile on Sohail Tanvir
  • CricketArchive Profile on Sohail Tanvir

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    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Asia Cricket Cup, Jaipur, Pakistan, Purple Cap, Rajasthan Royals, Rawalpindi, Shane Warne, Sohail Kukree, Sohail Tanvir | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#39)…Sohail Tanvir (Pakistan)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 14, 2008

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    Sohail Tanvir (born December 12, 1984 in Rawalpindi, Punjab) is a Pakistani cricketer. He created a name for himself in his early years as a street cricketer of Rawalpindi, and was known as “Sohail Kukree”.[citation needed]

    Domestic career:
    IPL career:
    On March 11, 2008, Tanvir was signed up in the second round of the Indian Premier League’s players’ auction by the Jaipur franchise, Rajasthan Royals, for $100,000.

    Playing in his third match of tournament, on May 4, Tanvir took a match-winning six wickets against the Chennai Super Kings at the Sawai Mansingh Stadium, Jaipur. His figures of 4-0-14-6 are a record for Twenty20 cricket. He ended the tournament as the highest wicket-taker, with 22 wickets from 11 matches at an average of 12.09, an economy rate of 6.46 and a strike rate of 11.20, the best among bowlers with more than six wickets.

    In the final of tournament, on June 1 at the Dr DY Patil Sports Academy in Mumbai, with Rajasthan chasing 164 to win, Tanvir added 21 runs along with captain Shane Warne. He hit the winning runs of the final ball of the innings, to see the Royals home. He was later presented with the “Purple Cap”, an award for the leading wicket-taker of the tournament.

    A statistical analysis conducted by Cricinfo after the conclusion of the league stage of the tournament rated Tanvir as the most successful player. He was also rated as the second best value player of the tournament, having been signed on for $100,000.

    International career:

    An allrounder, he is a hard-hitting left-handed batsman and left-arm fast-medium bowler who also bowls occasional left-arm orthodox spin. Despite not having taken a single wicket during his ten Twenty20 matches domestically, he was selected for Pakistan’s squad for the inaugral World Twenty20 after Shoaib Akhtar was sent home. He made his Twenty20 debut in the tournament, and took six wickets in six matches, with best bowling figures of 3 for 31 in four overs against Australia. Though considered an allrounder, Tanvir did not get a chance to bat in the tournament until the final, where he made his first international runs, with a six off his first ball, aiding Pakistan back into the game.

    After impressing in the ICC World Twenty20, he was selected to play in the ODI series against South Africa in October, 2007. He was then selected for the tour of India, and took eight wickets in the ODI series. He also took part in the Test series that followed, making his debut in place of the injured Umar Gul. On debut at the Feroz Shah Kotla in Dehli, he took three wickets which included Sourav Ganguly and Rahul Dravid. In Asia Cricket Cup, June 2008, Pakistan played their first game against Hong Kong at Karachi. In that match, Pakistan’s top order was badly ripped by Hong Kong bowlers before Sohail Tanvir set up a 100 run stand along with Fawad Alam for the 8th wicket. Sohail scored his maiden ODI 50 in that match. He scored 59 off just 55 balls which took Pakistan to a respectable score of 288. After that, in the match vs. Sri Lanka, Tanvir took his first 5 wickets haul. He ended at 5/48 in 10 overs.

    Links to more information on Sohail Tanvir:

  • Cricinfo.com Profile on Sohail Tanvir
  • CricketArchive Profile on Sohail Tanvir

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Asia Cricket Cup, Jaipur, Pakistan, Purple Cap, Rajasthan Royals, Rawalpindi, Shane Warne, Sohail Kukree, Sohail Tanvir | Leave a Comment »

    The Complete List of Test and O.D.I Cricketers

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 12, 2008

    Here is a list of links that take you to a page showing every cricketer that has played test cricket for their country. This might help with cricket related trivia so be sure to bookmark this site :).

    Test Cricket:

  • New Zealand Test Cricketers
  • List of Australian Test Cricketers
  • List of England Test Cricketers
  • List of West Indies Test Cricketers
  • List of Pakistan Test Cricketers
  • List of South Africa Test Cricketers
  • List of India Test Cricketers
  • List of Sri Lanka Test Cricricketers
  • List of Bangladesh Test Cricketers
  • List of Zimbabwe Test Cricketers

    O.D.I Cricket:
  • List of Australia ODI Cricketers
  • List of Bangladesh ODI Cricketers
  • List of Bermuda ODI Cricketers
  • List of Canada ODI Cricketers
  • List of England ODI Cricketers
  • List of Hong Kong ODI Cricketers
  • List of India ODI Cricketers
  • List of Ireland ODI Cricketers
  • List of Kenya ODI Cricketers
  • List of Namibia ODI Cricketers
  • List of Netherlands ODI Cricketers
  • List of New Zealand ODI Cricketers
  • List of Pakistan ODI Cricketers
  • List of Scotland ODI Cricketers
  • List of South Africa ODI Cricketers
  • List of Sri Lanka ODI Cricketers
  • List of U.A.E ODI Cricketers
  • List of U.S.A ODI Cricketers
  • List of West Indies ODI Cricketers
  • List of Zimbabwe ODI Cricketers

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Australia, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Canada, England, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Kenya, Namibia, Netherlands, new zealand, ODI, Pakistan, scotland, South Africa, Sri Lanka, USA, West Indies, Zimbabwe | Leave a Comment »

    The Complete List of Test and O.D.I Cricketers

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 12, 2008

    Here is a list of links that take you to a page showing every cricketer that has played test cricket for their country. This might help with cricket related trivia so be sure to bookmark this site :).

    Test Cricket:

  • New Zealand Test Cricketers
  • List of Australian Test Cricketers
  • List of England Test Cricketers
  • List of West Indies Test Cricketers
  • List of Pakistan Test Cricketers
  • List of South Africa Test Cricketers
  • List of India Test Cricketers
  • List of Sri Lanka Test Cricricketers
  • List of Bangladesh Test Cricketers
  • List of Zimbabwe Test Cricketers

    O.D.I Cricket:
  • List of Australia ODI Cricketers
  • List of Bangladesh ODI Cricketers
  • List of Bermuda ODI Cricketers
  • List of Canada ODI Cricketers
  • List of England ODI Cricketers
  • List of Hong Kong ODI Cricketers
  • List of India ODI Cricketers
  • List of Ireland ODI Cricketers
  • List of Kenya ODI Cricketers
  • List of Namibia ODI Cricketers
  • List of Netherlands ODI Cricketers
  • List of New Zealand ODI Cricketers
  • List of Pakistan ODI Cricketers
  • List of Scotland ODI Cricketers
  • List of South Africa ODI Cricketers
  • List of Sri Lanka ODI Cricketers
  • List of U.A.E ODI Cricketers
  • List of U.S.A ODI Cricketers
  • List of West Indies ODI Cricketers
  • List of Zimbabwe ODI Cricketers

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Australia, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Canada, England, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Kenya, Namibia, Netherlands, new zealand, ODI, Pakistan, scotland, South Africa, Sri Lanka, USA, West Indies, Zimbabwe | Leave a Comment »

    Introducing… the Twenty20 Champions League

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 5, 2008

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    The Twenty20 Champions League is an international Twenty20 cricket competition between clubs from Australia, England, India, Pakistan and South Africa. The Twenty20 Champions League is chaired by Lalit Modi, who is the Chairman and Commissioner of the Indian Premier League and Vice-President of the BCCI. The competition is being launched in 2008 as a response to the success of national Twenty20 domestic cricket leagues, most notably the Indian Premier League. The first edition was set to take place from late September to early October 2008 in India, after the tournament organisers resolved various teething problems that had put the inaugural tournament under some doubt, but it was later announced that the tournament would be held from December 3 to December 10, 2008. The initial tournament was postponed again following terrorist attacks in Mumbai in November 2008. A rearranged date has not been announced.

    Background:
    Chennai vs Kolkata in the Indian Premier League. Chennai have qualified for the first edition of the T20 Champions League

    An international tournament for domestic cricket teams is believed to have been first mooted by Lalit Modi, vice-president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) in 1996, Lalit Modi is also the chairman and commissioner on the IPL. The launch and subsequent success of Twenty20 cricket some years later was the influence behind a serious effort to get such a tournament off the ground. Twenty20 cricket was launched by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) in 2003. Its launch was a result of a long-term decline in the popularity of county championship and domestic limited-overs cricket. By reducing the number of overs per innings to twenty and by placing a three hour limit on matches, the format was designed to attract a younger crowd and to boost attendances. Twenty20 proved a success, with an international version launched in 2005 and a World Twenty20 Competition held in September 2007. This proved much more popular than the 50 over Cricket World Cup had been just five months previously. The following year, the Indian Premier League (IPL) was launched, proving that there could be a market for a big-spending domestic Twenty20 cricket league. The success of Twenty20 and the IPL lead many commentators to suggest that other forms of cricket would suffer, with some worrying about the effect of the popular fast-paced ‘slogging’ game on players’ abilities in Test cricket.

    Immediately after the end of the first series of the IPL, the cricket authorities in England, India, Australia and South Africa entered into discussions to create a new international club competition, to capitalize on the this success. The new tournament’s £2.5m winning prize was described as “unprecedented” in cricket. A number of different formats for the tournament were considered, with original proposals containing a much lower prize fund. The T20 Champions League’s creation was announced on 7 June 2008, along with the announcement of planned restructuring of some of the domestic cricket tournaments involved, including the introduction of franchising in South Africa, England and Australia. Pakistan’s participation was always mooted, but not confirmed when the tournament was first launched. Following a series of discussions and the announcement of the creation of a Pakistan Super League from 2009, it was confirmed that two Pakistani teams would compete.

    Format:
    Qualifying:
    Although the 2008 tournament was originally rumoured to only include teams from Australia, South Africa, India and England, it was announced on 4 July 2008, that two teams from Pakistan’s domestic tournament were also invited. At the same, time England’s participation was also put into doubt, following differences between the ECB & BCCI over the inclusion of rebel Indian Cricket League (ICL) players. Eventually, it was arranged so that the 2008 Twenty20 Champions League is to be contested between 8 teams from 5 countries. The qualifiers are:

  • The winners and runners-up of the KFC Twenty20 Big Bash in Australia.
  • The winners and runners-up of the Standard Bank Pro 20 Series in South Africa and Zimbabwe.
  • The winners of the Twenty20 Cup in England and Wales. (Note: Runners-up Kent were not invited to participate in the inaugural tournament because it contained two players who have taken part in the rebel Indian Cricket League, a competition that is not recognized by the BCCI).
  • The winners and runners-up of the Indian Premier League in India.
  • The winners of the RBS Twenty-20 Cup from Pakistan, (Sialkot Stallions in 2007-08).

    This format is expected to change as 12 teams will compete in the 2nd edition of the tournament in September-October 2009.

    England’s Participation:
    The organisers of the tournament confirmed that any team competing would be banned from fielding players who have competed in the Indian Cricket League, a rival to the Indian Premier League. As a result of this, England’s participation in the tournament was put in jeopardy. For the the 2008 season, 15 of the 18 counties fielded 25 players from the ICL. On 24 July 2008, IPL commissioner Lalit Modi confirmed their stance by stating that only Middlesex and Essex stood a chance of being invited to the Champions League because they didn’t have ICL links. Middlesex won the Twenty20 Cup and confirmed they had accepted the invitation to participate in the tournament. Kent were officially barred from the competition on 1 August, and the ECB’s suggestion to replace them with Essex was rejected by Cricket Australia.

    Tournament:
    The Twenty20 Champions League will be played over an eight day period and will consist of two divisions competing in a round-robin format. The top two teams from each division will then move on to an elimination round to the finals.

    Links to more information on the Twenty20 Champions League:

  • Cricket Champions League unveiled
  • Everything you wanted to know about the Champions League
  • Champions League Twenty20 Moved To December

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Australia, B.C.C.I, ECB, England, India, Lalit Modi, Pakistan, South Africa, Twenty20 Champions League | Leave a Comment »

    Introducing… the Twenty20 Champions League

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 5, 2008

    Photobucket

    The Twenty20 Champions League is an international Twenty20 cricket competition between clubs from Australia, England, India, Pakistan and South Africa. The Twenty20 Champions League is chaired by Lalit Modi, who is the Chairman and Commissioner of the Indian Premier League and Vice-President of the BCCI. The competition is being launched in 2008 as a response to the success of national Twenty20 domestic cricket leagues, most notably the Indian Premier League. The first edition was set to take place from late September to early October 2008 in India, after the tournament organisers resolved various teething problems that had put the inaugural tournament under some doubt, but it was later announced that the tournament would be held from December 3 to December 10, 2008. The initial tournament was postponed again following terrorist attacks in Mumbai in November 2008. A rearranged date has not been announced.

    Background:
    Chennai vs Kolkata in the Indian Premier League. Chennai have qualified for the first edition of the T20 Champions League

    An international tournament for domestic cricket teams is believed to have been first mooted by Lalit Modi, vice-president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) in 1996, Lalit Modi is also the chairman and commissioner on the IPL. The launch and subsequent success of Twenty20 cricket some years later was the influence behind a serious effort to get such a tournament off the ground. Twenty20 cricket was launched by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) in 2003. Its launch was a result of a long-term decline in the popularity of county championship and domestic limited-overs cricket. By reducing the number of overs per innings to twenty and by placing a three hour limit on matches, the format was designed to attract a younger crowd and to boost attendances. Twenty20 proved a success, with an international version launched in 2005 and a World Twenty20 Competition held in September 2007. This proved much more popular than the 50 over Cricket World Cup had been just five months previously. The following year, the Indian Premier League (IPL) was launched, proving that there could be a market for a big-spending domestic Twenty20 cricket league. The success of Twenty20 and the IPL lead many commentators to suggest that other forms of cricket would suffer, with some worrying about the effect of the popular fast-paced ‘slogging’ game on players’ abilities in Test cricket.

    Immediately after the end of the first series of the IPL, the cricket authorities in England, India, Australia and South Africa entered into discussions to create a new international club competition, to capitalize on the this success. The new tournament’s £2.5m winning prize was described as “unprecedented” in cricket. A number of different formats for the tournament were considered, with original proposals containing a much lower prize fund. The T20 Champions League’s creation was announced on 7 June 2008, along with the announcement of planned restructuring of some of the domestic cricket tournaments involved, including the introduction of franchising in South Africa, England and Australia. Pakistan’s participation was always mooted, but not confirmed when the tournament was first launched. Following a series of discussions and the announcement of the creation of a Pakistan Super League from 2009, it was confirmed that two Pakistani teams would compete.

    Format:
    Qualifying:
    Although the 2008 tournament was originally rumoured to only include teams from Australia, South Africa, India and England, it was announced on 4 July 2008, that two teams from Pakistan’s domestic tournament were also invited. At the same, time England’s participation was also put into doubt, following differences between the ECB & BCCI over the inclusion of rebel Indian Cricket League (ICL) players. Eventually, it was arranged so that the 2008 Twenty20 Champions League is to be contested between 8 teams from 5 countries. The qualifiers are:

  • The winners and runners-up of the KFC Twenty20 Big Bash in Australia.
  • The winners and runners-up of the Standard Bank Pro 20 Series in South Africa and Zimbabwe.
  • The winners of the Twenty20 Cup in England and Wales. (Note: Runners-up Kent were not invited to participate in the inaugural tournament because it contained two players who have taken part in the rebel Indian Cricket League, a competition that is not recognized by the BCCI).
  • The winners and runners-up of the Indian Premier League in India.
  • The winners of the RBS Twenty-20 Cup from Pakistan, (Sialkot Stallions in 2007-08).

    This format is expected to change as 12 teams will compete in the 2nd edition of the tournament in September-October 2009.

    England’s Participation:
    The organisers of the tournament confirmed that any team competing would be banned from fielding players who have competed in the Indian Cricket League, a rival to the Indian Premier League. As a result of this, England’s participation in the tournament was put in jeopardy. For the the 2008 season, 15 of the 18 counties fielded 25 players from the ICL. On 24 July 2008, IPL commissioner Lalit Modi confirmed their stance by stating that only Middlesex and Essex stood a chance of being invited to the Champions League because they didn’t have ICL links. Middlesex won the Twenty20 Cup and confirmed they had accepted the invitation to participate in the tournament. Kent were officially barred from the competition on 1 August, and the ECB’s suggestion to replace them with Essex was rejected by Cricket Australia.

    Tournament:
    The Twenty20 Champions League will be played over an eight day period and will consist of two divisions competing in a round-robin format. The top two teams from each division will then move on to an elimination round to the finals.

    Links to more information on the Twenty20 Champions League:

  • Cricket Champions League unveiled
  • Everything you wanted to know about the Champions League
  • Champions League Twenty20 Moved To December

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Australia, B.C.C.I, ECB, England, India, Lalit Modi, Pakistan, South Africa, Twenty20 Champions League | Leave a Comment »

    In the International Spotlight…Pakistan Cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 17, 2008

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    The Pakistan National Cricket Team is an international cricket team representing Pakistan. It is administrated by the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB). Pakistan is a full member of the International Cricket Council with Test and One Day International status.

    Before the independence of Pakistan, cricket was played well before the first Pakistan national team was granted test match playing status. Documentation and archives show that during the 18th century, cricket was played on the western side of India and many successful Indian cricketers played for the English cricket team. It was not until July 28, 1952 that Pakistan started playing test match cricket. Their first match took place in Delhi against India on October of the same year. Their first international tour was to England during 1954. Over the half century, Pakistan has become one of the most challenging and unpredictable teams in the world, the team won the 1992 World Cup and were runners up in the 1999 World Cup. The country has produced several world-class players such as Fazal Mahmood, Hanif Mohammad, Sarfaraz Nawaz, Mushtaq Mohammad, Imran Khan, Javed Miandad, Abdul Qadir, Wasim Akram, Inzamam-ul-Haq, Waqar Younis, Mohammad Yousuf and Shoaib Akhtar.

    As of October 2007, the Pakistani team has played 332 Test matches, winning 31.02%, losing 26.50% and drawing 42.46% of its games. The team is ranked sixth in the ICC Test Championship and fifth place in the ICC ODI Championship. On 28 August 2006, Pakistan won its debut Twenty20 International match in England and were runners up in the inaugral ICC World Twenty20 in September 2007.

    History:

    Following the Partition of India in 1947, and the establishment of the separate nation state of Pakistan, cricket in the country developed steadily and Pakistan was given Test Match status at a meeting of the Imperial Cricket Conference at Lord’s Cricket Ground on 28 July 1952 following recommendation by India, which, being the successor state of the British Raj, did not have to go through such a process.

    Pakistan’s first Test match was played in Delhi in October 1952 as part of a five Test series which India won 2-1. Pakistan made their first tour of England in 1954 and drew the series 1-1 after a memorable victory at The Oval in which fast bowler Fazal Mahmood took 12 wickets. Pakistan’s first home Test match was in Dacca in January 1955 against India, after which four more Test matches were played in Bahawalpur, Lahore, Peshawar and Karachi (all five matches in the series were drawn, the first such occurrence in test history).

    The team is considered a strong but unpredictable team. Traditionally Pakistani cricket has been filled with players of great talent but limited discipline, making them a team which could play inspirational cricket one day and then perform less than ordinarily another day. Over the years, competitions between India and Pakistan have always been emotionally charged and provide for intriguing contests, as talented teams from both sides of the border elevate their game to new levels to produce high-quality cricket. Pakistani contest with India in the Cricket World Cup have seen packed stadiums and elevated atmospheres no matter where the World Cup has been held.

    The 1986 Australasia Cup, played in Sharjah, is remembered as a famous last-ball victory for Pakistan against arch-rivals India, with Javed Miandad emerging as a national hero. India batted first and set a target of 245 runs, leaving Pakistan with a required run rate of 4.92 runs per over. Javed Miandad came in to bat at number 3, and Pakistan lost wickets at regular intervals. Later recalling the match, Miandad stated that his main focus was to lose with dignity. With 31 runs needed in the last three overs, Miandad hit a string of boundaries while batting with his team’s lower order, until four runs were required from the last delivery of the match. Miandad received a leg side full toss from Chetan Sharma, which he hit for six over the midwicket boundary.

    At the 1992 World Cup Semi Final, having won the toss New Zealand chose to bat first and ended with a total of 262. Pakistan batted conservatively yet lost wickets at regular intervals. With the departure of Imran Khan and Saleem Malik shortly thereafter, Pakistan still required 115 runs at a rate of 7.67 per over with veteran Javed Miandad being the only known batsman remaining at the crease. A young Inzamam-ul-Haq, who had just turned 22 and was not a well-known player at the time, burst onto the international stage with a match-winning 60 off 37 balls. Once Inzamam got out, Pakistan required 36 from 30 balls, which wicketkeeper Moin Khan ended with a towering six over long off, followed by the winning boundary to midwicket. The match is seen as the emergence of Inzamam onto the international stage.

    The 1992 Cricket World Cup in Australia & New Zealand marked Pakistan’s first World Cup victory. It is remembered for the comeback Pakistan made after losing key players such as Waqar Younis and Saeed Anwar, and being led by an injured captain in Imran Khan. Pakistan lost 4 of their first 5 matches and were nearly eliminated in the first round of the tournament after being bowled out for 74 against England, until the match was declared as a “no result” due to rain. Captain Imran Khan famously told the team to play as “cornered tigers”, after which Pakistan won five successive matches, including, most famously, the semi-final against hosts New Zealand and the final against England.

    The 2007 Cricket World Cup was one of the biggest upsets in World Cup history when Pakistan was knocked out of the competition in a shock defeat to Ireland, who were playing in their first competition. Pakistan, needing to win to qualify for the next stage after losing to the West Indies in their opening match, were put into bat by Ireland on a green pitch. They lost wickets regularly and only 4 batsmen crossed double figures. In the end they were bowled out by the resurgent Irish for 132. The Irish went on to win the match, helped by a knock of 72 from Niall O’Brien. This meant that Pakistan had been knocked out during the first round for the second consecutive World Cup. Tragedy struck the team when coach Bob Woolmer died one day later on March 18, 2007 in a hospital in Kingston, Jamaica. Jamaican police spokesman, Karl Angell, reported on March 23, 2007 that, “Mr Woolmer’s death was due to asphyxiation as a result of manual strangulation”, and that, “Mr Woolmer’s death is now being treated by the Jamaica police as a case of murder.” Subsequent to his team’s defeat and the death of Bob Woolmer, Inzamam-ul-Haq announced his resignation as captain of the team and his retirement from one-day cricket, stating that he would continue to take part in Test cricket but not as captain.

    On 23 March 2007, Pakistan players and officials were questioned by Jamaican police and submitted DNA samples along with fingerprints, as part of the routine enquiries in the investigation into Woolmer’s murder. Three days after leaving the West Indies for Pakistan, via London, the Pakistan team were ruled out as suspects. The deputy commissioner of Jamaican police. Mark Shields, the detective in charge of the investigation, announced, “It’s fair to say they are now being treated as witnesses.” “I have got no evidence to suggest it was anybody in the squad.” A memorial service was held in Sacred Heart Church, Lahore, for Bob Woolmer on 1 April 2007. Among the attendees were Pakistan players and dignitaries, including Inzamam-ul-Haq, who was quoted as saying, “After Woolmer’s family, the Pakistan team was the most aggrieved by his death.” After the World Cup ended, serious doubts were raised about the investigation, with increasing speculation that Woolmer died of natural causes. This has now been accepted as fact, and the case has been closed.

    On 16 July 2007, Geoff Lawson, previously head coach of New South Wales, was appointed coach of the Pakistan for two years, becoming the third foreigner to take on the role. In the 2007 ICC World Twenty20, Pakistan exceeded expectations to reach the final but ended as runners-up, after losing the final to India in a nail-biting finish.

    The Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) is responsible for all first class and Test cricket played in Pakistan and by the Pakistan cricket team. It was admitted to the International Cricket Council in July 1953. The corporation has been run by former cricketers, professional administrators and trustees, who are often respected businessmen. The Board governs a network of teams sponsored by corporations and banks, city associations and clubs including advertising, broadcasting rights and internet partners.

    After taking heavy flak for corruption and match fixing, the PCB re-emerged by taking the initiative to sponsor the wildly successful 2004 tour of Pakistan by arch rivals India. The PCB’s experiment with the Twenty20 cricket model has also proven popular and hopes to similarly revive popular interest in domestic games. The PCB also set up major domestic competitions such as the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy, and the ANZ Trophy.

    See Also:

  • Pakistan Under-19 cricket team
  • Pakistani national cricket captains
  • Pakistan national women’s cricket team
  • India versus Pakistan cricket rivalry
  • Pakistan Cricket Team Records
  • Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB)
  • Cricinfo Pakistan
  • BBC Sport: Pakistan cricket team news and fixtures
  • Cricket in Pakistan
  • Cricket news for Pakistan
  • Online Pakistan Cricket Magazine
  • Cricinfo List of Cricket Grounds in Pakistan
  • BBC sport Pakistan Cricket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org, Cricinfo.com and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in ANZ Trophy, Bob Woolmer, Geoff Lawson, Karachi, Lahore, Pakistan, Pakistan Cricket Board, PCB, Peshawar, Quaid-e-Azam Trophy, Rawalpindi, Shoaib Akhtar, Wasim Akram | Leave a Comment »

    In the International Spotlight…Pakistan Cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 16, 2008

    Photobucket

    Photobucket

    The Pakistan National Cricket Team is an international cricket team representing Pakistan. It is administrated by the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB). Pakistan is a full member of the International Cricket Council with Test and One Day International status.

    Before the independence of Pakistan, cricket was played well before the first Pakistan national team was granted test match playing status. Documentation and archives show that during the 18th century, cricket was played on the western side of India and many successful Indian cricketers played for the English cricket team. It was not until July 28, 1952 that Pakistan started playing test match cricket. Their first match took place in Delhi against India on October of the same year. Their first international tour was to England during 1954. Over the half century, Pakistan has become one of the most challenging and unpredictable teams in the world, the team won the 1992 World Cup and were runners up in the 1999 World Cup. The country has produced several world-class players such as Fazal Mahmood, Hanif Mohammad, Sarfaraz Nawaz, Mushtaq Mohammad, Imran Khan, Javed Miandad, Abdul Qadir, Wasim Akram, Inzamam-ul-Haq, Waqar Younis, Mohammad Yousuf and Shoaib Akhtar.

    As of October 2007, the Pakistani team has played 332 Test matches, winning 31.02%, losing 26.50% and drawing 42.46% of its games. The team is ranked sixth in the ICC Test Championship and fifth place in the ICC ODI Championship. On 28 August 2006, Pakistan won its debut Twenty20 International match in England and were runners up in the inaugral ICC World Twenty20 in September 2007.

    History:

    Following the Partition of India in 1947, and the establishment of the separate nation state of Pakistan, cricket in the country developed steadily and Pakistan was given Test Match status at a meeting of the Imperial Cricket Conference at Lord’s Cricket Ground on 28 July 1952 following recommendation by India, which, being the successor state of the British Raj, did not have to go through such a process.

    Pakistan’s first Test match was played in Delhi in October 1952 as part of a five Test series which India won 2-1. Pakistan made their first tour of England in 1954 and drew the series 1-1 after a memorable victory at The Oval in which fast bowler Fazal Mahmood took 12 wickets. Pakistan’s first home Test match was in Dacca in January 1955 against India, after which four more Test matches were played in Bahawalpur, Lahore, Peshawar and Karachi (all five matches in the series were drawn, the first such occurrence in test history).

    The team is considered a strong but unpredictable team. Traditionally Pakistani cricket has been filled with players of great talent but limited discipline, making them a team which could play inspirational cricket one day and then perform less than ordinarily another day. Over the years, competitions between India and Pakistan have always been emotionally charged and provide for intriguing contests, as talented teams from both sides of the border elevate their game to new levels to produce high-quality cricket. Pakistani contest with India in the Cricket World Cup have seen packed stadiums and elevated atmospheres no matter where the World Cup has been held.

    The 1986 Australasia Cup, played in Sharjah, is remembered as a famous last-ball victory for Pakistan against arch-rivals India, with Javed Miandad emerging as a national hero. India batted first and set a target of 245 runs, leaving Pakistan with a required run rate of 4.92 runs per over. Javed Miandad came in to bat at number 3, and Pakistan lost wickets at regular intervals. Later recalling the match, Miandad stated that his main focus was to lose with dignity. With 31 runs needed in the last three overs, Miandad hit a string of boundaries while batting with his team’s lower order, until four runs were required from the last delivery of the match. Miandad received a leg side full toss from Chetan Sharma, which he hit for six over the midwicket boundary.

    At the 1992 World Cup Semi Final, having won the toss New Zealand chose to bat first and ended with a total of 262. Pakistan batted conservatively yet lost wickets at regular intervals. With the departure of Imran Khan and Saleem Malik shortly thereafter, Pakistan still required 115 runs at a rate of 7.67 per over with veteran Javed Miandad being the only known batsman remaining at the crease. A young Inzamam-ul-Haq, who had just turned 22 and was not a well-known player at the time, burst onto the international stage with a match-winning 60 off 37 balls. Once Inzamam got out, Pakistan required 36 from 30 balls, which wicketkeeper Moin Khan ended with a towering six over long off, followed by the winning boundary to midwicket. The match is seen as the emergence of Inzamam onto the international stage.

    The 1992 Cricket World Cup in Australia & New Zealand marked Pakistan’s first World Cup victory. It is remembered for the comeback Pakistan made after losing key players such as Waqar Younis and Saeed Anwar, and being led by an injured captain in Imran Khan. Pakistan lost 4 of their first 5 matches and were nearly eliminated in the first round of the tournament after being bowled out for 74 against England, until the match was declared as a “no result” due to rain. Captain Imran Khan famously told the team to play as “cornered tigers”, after which Pakistan won five successive matches, including, most famously, the semi-final against hosts New Zealand and the final against England.

    The 2007 Cricket World Cup was one of the biggest upsets in World Cup history when Pakistan was knocked out of the competition in a shock defeat to Ireland, who were playing in their first competition. Pakistan, needing to win to qualify for the next stage after losing to the West Indies in their opening match, were put into bat by Ireland on a green pitch. They lost wickets regularly and only 4 batsmen crossed double figures. In the end they were bowled out by the resurgent Irish for 132. The Irish went on to win the match, helped by a knock of 72 from Niall O’Brien. This meant that Pakistan had been knocked out during the first round for the second consecutive World Cup. Tragedy struck the team when coach Bob Woolmer died one day later on March 18, 2007 in a hospital in Kingston, Jamaica. Jamaican police spokesman, Karl Angell, reported on March 23, 2007 that, “Mr Woolmer’s death was due to asphyxiation as a result of manual strangulation”, and that, “Mr Woolmer’s death is now being treated by the Jamaica police as a case of murder.” Subsequent to his team’s defeat and the death of Bob Woolmer, Inzamam-ul-Haq announced his resignation as captain of the team and his retirement from one-day cricket, stating that he would continue to take part in Test cricket but not as captain.

    On 23 March 2007, Pakistan players and officials were questioned by Jamaican police and submitted DNA samples along with fingerprints, as part of the routine enquiries in the investigation into Woolmer’s murder. Three days after leaving the West Indies for Pakistan, via London, the Pakistan team were ruled out as suspects. The deputy commissioner of Jamaican police. Mark Shields, the detective in charge of the investigation, announced, “It’s fair to say they are now being treated as witnesses.” “I have got no evidence to suggest it was anybody in the squad.” A memorial service was held in Sacred Heart Church, Lahore, for Bob Woolmer on 1 April 2007. Among the attendees were Pakistan players and dignitaries, including Inzamam-ul-Haq, who was quoted as saying, “After Woolmer’s family, the Pakistan team was the most aggrieved by his death.” After the World Cup ended, serious doubts were raised about the investigation, with increasing speculation that Woolmer died of natural causes. This has now been accepted as fact, and the case has been closed.

    On 16 July 2007, Geoff Lawson, previously head coach of New South Wales, was appointed coach of the Pakistan for two years, becoming the third foreigner to take on the role. In the 2007 ICC World Twenty20, Pakistan exceeded expectations to reach the final but ended as runners-up, after losing the final to India in a nail-biting finish.

    The Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) is responsible for all first class and Test cricket played in Pakistan and by the Pakistan cricket team. It was admitted to the International Cricket Council in July 1953. The corporation has been run by former cricketers, professional administrators and trustees, who are often respected businessmen. The Board governs a network of teams sponsored by corporations and banks, city associations and clubs including advertising, broadcasting rights and internet partners.

    After taking heavy flak for corruption and match fixing, the PCB re-emerged by taking the initiative to sponsor the wildly successful 2004 tour of Pakistan by arch rivals India. The PCB’s experiment with the Twenty20 cricket model has also proven popular and hopes to similarly revive popular interest in domestic games. The PCB also set up major domestic competitions such as the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy, and the ANZ Trophy.

    See Also:

  • Pakistan Under-19 cricket team
  • Pakistani national cricket captains
  • Pakistan national women’s cricket team
  • India versus Pakistan cricket rivalry
  • Pakistan Cricket Team Records
  • Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB)
  • Cricinfo Pakistan
  • BBC Sport: Pakistan cricket team news and fixtures
  • Cricket in Pakistan
  • Cricket news for Pakistan
  • Online Pakistan Cricket Magazine
  • Cricinfo List of Cricket Grounds in Pakistan
  • BBC sport Pakistan Cricket
  • Posted in ANZ Trophy, Bob Woolmer, Geoff Lawson, Karachi, Lahore, Pakistan, Pakistan Cricket Board, PCB, Peshawar, Quaid-e-Azam Trophy, Rawalpindi, Shoaib Akhtar, Wasim Akram | Leave a Comment »

    The greatest bowling partnership ever in modern cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 13, 2008

    The other day I was browsing through some videos on Youtube and I came across this particular one, it perfectly shows you that the bowling pair of Wasim Akram and Waqar Younis was the best bowling partnership ever in modern cricket. With Waqar’s lethal Toe Crushers and Wasims dangerous swinging deliveries that seemed to cannon into your stumps out of nowhere, its easy to see that they were definetly one on the most destructive bowling partnerships of modern cricket, and perhaps all time.

    To show you the proof here is that video that displays a brilliant montage on this legendary bowling partnership:

    Posted in Inswinging Yorker, Lethal, Pakistan, Sultan of Swing, Swing, Toe Crusher, Waqar Younis, Wasim Akram | Leave a Comment »