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In the International Spotlight…Uganda Cricket

Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 25, 2008

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The Uganda national cricket team is the team that represents the country of Uganda in international cricket matches. Having previously been part of the combined East African and East and Central African teams, they became an associate member of the International Cricket Council in their own right in 1998. They began to play international cricket in 1951/52 when they first took part in a triangular tournament against regional rivals Kenya and Tanzania (then Tanganyika).

They have competed in the ICC Trophy on two occasions, in 2001 and 2005. They won Division Three of the World Cricket League in Darwin, Australia in 2007, qualifying them for Division Two of the same tournament towards the end of 2007, which also qualified them for a spot on the ICC’s High Performance Program.

History:

East Africa team:

Uganda combined with their regional rivals Kenya and Tanzania to form the East Africa team. The first known match for this team was against a South African “Non-Europeans” team captained by Basil D’Oliveira in September 1958 in Nairobi, with the visitors winning by seven wickets. East Africa became an associate member of the ICC in 1966 and India toured the following year, winning a match against Uganda by 6 wickets before a first-class match against East Africa in Kampala which India won by 8 wickets.

East Africa toured England in 1972 and the Marylebone Cricket Club played a first-class match against East Africa in January 1974, winning by 237 runs. The following year, East Africa played in the 1975 Cricket World Cup in England. After various warm-up games, including a 3 wicket win against Glamorgan, they played New Zealand, India and England in the World Cup itself, losing all three matches. The World Cup was followed by a first-class match against Sri Lanka at the County Cricket Ground, Taunton, which the Sri Lankans won by 115 runs. East Africa played in the ICC Trophies of 1979, 1982 and 1986, without qualifying for the World Cup from any of them.

Uganda continued playing their regular matches against Kenya and Tanzania, despite Kenya leaving the East Africa combination in and the triangular tournament became a quadrangular tournament in 1966 when Zambia joined in. From then until the tournament’s end in 1980, Uganda won the tournament just once.

East and Central Africa cricket team:
The East Africa team left the ICC in 1989 and was replaced by the East and Central Africa team the same year. This new team was a combination of Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia, and they took part in the ICC Trophy for the first time in 1990, also taking part in 1994, 1997 and 2001.

Setting out on their own:
Uganda left the East and Central Africa combination and became an associate member of the ICC in their own right in 1998. Their first international tournament was the 2001 ICC Trophy. After winning all five of their first round games, they lost a play-off match against the UAE for the right to enter the second stage of the tournament. The following year, they finished third in their group in the Africa Cup.

In 2004, Uganda played their first first-class matches in the ICC Intercontinental Cup against Kenya and Namibia, winning against Namibia. In August that year, they finished second to Namibia in the Africa Cricket Association Championships in Zambia. This qualified them for the following years ICC Trophy, in which they finished in twelfth and last place after losing to Papua New Guinea in their final play-off match. Earlier in the year, they again played against Namibia and Kenya in the 2005 ICC Intercontinental Cup, losing both games.

Present Day:
In January 2007, Uganda faced Bermuda and Canada as those two teams prepared for Division One of the World Cricket League in Nairobi. This also served as preparation for Uganda’s visit to Darwin, Australia, for Division Three of the same tournament. They won their games against the Cayman Islands, Hong Kong and Tanzania before beating Papua New Guinea in the semi-final. They then beat Argentina in the final of the tournament.

Uganda’s performance in the Division Three tournament means that they have gained a spot in the ICC’s High Performance Program, and will now travel to Windhoek, Namibia towards the end of 2007 where they will face Argentina, Denmark, Oman and the UAE in addition to hosts Namibia. A top four finish in this tournament will qualify them for the 2009 ICC World Cup Qualifier, whilst a bottom two finish will mean that they play in Division Three again in 2009.

Uganda took part in a four-team Twenty20 tournament prior to the 2007 Twenty20 World Cup, playing games against Pakistan, Kenya, and Bangladesh in Nairobi. As expected, they lost against Pakistan and Bangladesh, losing but they stunned African rivals Kenya with a two-wicket win.

Their next matches were two one-day games against Bermuda, also in Nairobi, in October 2007. They surprised their more experienced rivals, going down by just seven runs after Nandikishore Patel and Danniel Ruyange scored half-centuries, before winning the second match by 43 runs with Joel Olwenyi scoring a half-century of his own.

Links to more information on Uganda Cricket:

  • Uganda Cricket @ Cricketarchive.com
  • Uganda Cricket Timeline
  • Uganda Cricket @ Cricinfo.com

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

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    Posted in cricket in uganda, East Africa, ICC High Performance Program, ICC Trophy, ICC World Cricket League, Marybelone Cricket Club, Uganda Cricket | Leave a Comment »

    In the International Spotlight…Uganda Cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 25, 2008

    Photobucket

    The Uganda national cricket team is the team that represents the country of Uganda in international cricket matches. Having previously been part of the combined East African and East and Central African teams, they became an associate member of the International Cricket Council in their own right in 1998. They began to play international cricket in 1951/52 when they first took part in a triangular tournament against regional rivals Kenya and Tanzania (then Tanganyika).

    They have competed in the ICC Trophy on two occasions, in 2001 and 2005. They won Division Three of the World Cricket League in Darwin, Australia in 2007, qualifying them for Division Two of the same tournament towards the end of 2007, which also qualified them for a spot on the ICC’s High Performance Program.

    History:

    East Africa team:

    Uganda combined with their regional rivals Kenya and Tanzania to form the East Africa team. The first known match for this team was against a South African “Non-Europeans” team captained by Basil D’Oliveira in September 1958 in Nairobi, with the visitors winning by seven wickets. East Africa became an associate member of the ICC in 1966 and India toured the following year, winning a match against Uganda by 6 wickets before a first-class match against East Africa in Kampala which India won by 8 wickets.

    East Africa toured England in 1972 and the Marylebone Cricket Club played a first-class match against East Africa in January 1974, winning by 237 runs. The following year, East Africa played in the 1975 Cricket World Cup in England. After various warm-up games, including a 3 wicket win against Glamorgan, they played New Zealand, India and England in the World Cup itself, losing all three matches. The World Cup was followed by a first-class match against Sri Lanka at the County Cricket Ground, Taunton, which the Sri Lankans won by 115 runs. East Africa played in the ICC Trophies of 1979, 1982 and 1986, without qualifying for the World Cup from any of them.

    Uganda continued playing their regular matches against Kenya and Tanzania, despite Kenya leaving the East Africa combination in and the triangular tournament became a quadrangular tournament in 1966 when Zambia joined in. From then until the tournament’s end in 1980, Uganda won the tournament just once.

    East and Central Africa cricket team:
    The East Africa team left the ICC in 1989 and was replaced by the East and Central Africa team the same year. This new team was a combination of Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia, and they took part in the ICC Trophy for the first time in 1990, also taking part in 1994, 1997 and 2001.

    Setting out on their own:
    Uganda left the East and Central Africa combination and became an associate member of the ICC in their own right in 1998. Their first international tournament was the 2001 ICC Trophy. After winning all five of their first round games, they lost a play-off match against the UAE for the right to enter the second stage of the tournament. The following year, they finished third in their group in the Africa Cup.

    In 2004, Uganda played their first first-class matches in the ICC Intercontinental Cup against Kenya and Namibia, winning against Namibia. In August that year, they finished second to Namibia in the Africa Cricket Association Championships in Zambia. This qualified them for the following years ICC Trophy, in which they finished in twelfth and last place after losing to Papua New Guinea in their final play-off match. Earlier in the year, they again played against Namibia and Kenya in the 2005 ICC Intercontinental Cup, losing both games.

    Present Day:
    In January 2007, Uganda faced Bermuda and Canada as those two teams prepared for Division One of the World Cricket League in Nairobi. This also served as preparation for Uganda’s visit to Darwin, Australia, for Division Three of the same tournament. They won their games against the Cayman Islands, Hong Kong and Tanzania before beating Papua New Guinea in the semi-final. They then beat Argentina in the final of the tournament.

    Uganda’s performance in the Division Three tournament means that they have gained a spot in the ICC’s High Performance Program, and will now travel to Windhoek, Namibia towards the end of 2007 where they will face Argentina, Denmark, Oman and the UAE in addition to hosts Namibia. A top four finish in this tournament will qualify them for the 2009 ICC World Cup Qualifier, whilst a bottom two finish will mean that they play in Division Three again in 2009.

    Uganda took part in a four-team Twenty20 tournament prior to the 2007 Twenty20 World Cup, playing games against Pakistan, Kenya, and Bangladesh in Nairobi. As expected, they lost against Pakistan and Bangladesh, losing but they stunned African rivals Kenya with a two-wicket win.

    Their next matches were two one-day games against Bermuda, also in Nairobi, in October 2007. They surprised their more experienced rivals, going down by just seven runs after Nandikishore Patel and Danniel Ruyange scored half-centuries, before winning the second match by 43 runs with Joel Olwenyi scoring a half-century of his own.

    Links to more information on Uganda Cricket:

  • Uganda Cricket @ Cricketarchive.com
  • Uganda Cricket Timeline
  • Uganda Cricket @ Cricinfo.com

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in cricket in uganda, East Africa, ICC High Performance Program, ICC Trophy, ICC World Cricket League, Marybelone Cricket Club, Uganda Cricket | Leave a Comment »

    Some very worthwhile extras, must see!

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on February 13, 2008

    Hey everyone,
    Was at a friends house the other day and saw this confusing yet amusing poem about cricket. It boggled my mind to start with but managed to get my head around it:) Without further ado here it is:

    Cricket- as explained to a foreign visitor:

    Each man thats in the side that’s in goes out and when he’s out he comes in and the next man goes in until he’s out.

    When they are all out, the side thats out comes in and the side that’s been in goes out and then tries to get those coming in out.

    Sometimes you get men still in and not out.

    When both sides have been in and out including the not outs…

    Thats the end of the game.

    HOWZAT!?

    *Acknowledgements to the Marybelone Cricket Club, and “Ulster”.

    Posted in cricket poem, howzat, Marybelone Cricket Club, poem about cricket, Ulster, worthwhile cricket extra's | Leave a Comment »

    Some very worthwhile extras, must see!

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on February 13, 2008

    Hey everyone,
    Was at a friends house the other day and saw this confusing yet amusing poem about cricket. It boggled my mind to start with but managed to get my head around it:) Without further ado here it is:

    Cricket- as explained to a foreign visitor:

    Each man thats in the side that’s in goes out and when he’s out he comes in and the next man goes in until he’s out.

    When they are all out, the side thats out comes in and the side that’s been in goes out and then tries to get those coming in out.

    Sometimes you get men still in and not out.

    When both sides have been in and out including the not outs…

    Thats the end of the game.

    HOWZAT!?

    *Acknowledgements to the Marybelone Cricket Club, and “Ulster”.

    Posted in cricket poem, howzat, Marybelone Cricket Club, poem about cricket, Ulster, worthwhile cricket extra's | Leave a Comment »

    In the International Spotlight…Argentina Cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on February 7, 2008

    In the International Spotlight(no#2)…Argentina Cricket:

    Europe/U.K, Africa, Asia, Australasia and North America….are home to the most recognised cricketing countries in the world today, but what about South America? In each of the regions in the previous sentence there has been at least one country that has qualified for major international cricket events such as the I.C.C Cricket World Cup and the Champions Trophy, but it appears South America isn’t represented. In case some people don’t know South American Cricket is alive and well (to the naked eye) and one of these countries that have fought for recognition in the cricketing world is Argentina.

    This 30+ something million populated Spanish-speaking country is one of the largest countries in South America and while it’s more known for its rugby and soccer national teams, but somewhere in all the fanfare of those sports is Cricket. Cricket first began in this nation as early as 1806. Around that time colonies from Britain were coming into the then newly recognised republic and by 1823 there were approximately 3,000 British persons in Buenos Aires. Of course cricket came along for the ride and the first reference to cricket in that area appeared in the issue of the British Packey (a paper printed in English which was established in 1826). The article that appeared in that issue mentioned that the Buenos Aires Cricket Club was formed by some 25 members who had ‘recently played some superb games of the elegant and brilliant game of cricket’. The Buenos Aires Cricket Club ground, which is situated at Palermo Park, was the area where cricket was mainly focussed, as well as other sports at the time. It was made official in 1864 when a game was played between HMS Bombay and themselves and the home team took the game out by 9 wickets. However, tragedy struck when nearly a week later the HMS Bombay caught fire off the coastal area off Uruguay and with such a tragedy as this there was also an enormous fatality in human lives. It was said to be ironic because in 1948 a prominent Argentinian woman called Evita Peron had the main clubhouse burnt down because of her somewhat “selfish” desire for some welfare scheme of hers. It was said she done this at a fit of rage because of the stubbornness of the Englishmen’s refusal to give the ground up for that scheme of hers.

    As the Englishmen drew further and further into Argentine society the native people gradually took over the main trades that the Englishmen held, and it was them, and the North committee that later moved to Rosario, which is around 322 km northwest of the main city of Buenos Aires. The South committee had always been in Buenos Aires. As this flow of people moved south, the line that divided between the 2 teams was affected to the degree that it was moved right into Buenos Aires itself, until today when it had become somewhat a trial of strength between the clubs. With that came Belgrano and Lomas forming into South and Hurlingham, and also St Andrews and BACRC (Buenos Aires Cricket and Rugby Club)- located in Don Torcuato, formed “North”.
    The official Argentine Cricket Association didn’t form until 1913 and it took 20 years for the organisation for cricket to take control of all organised cricket in the country. Cricket historians have noticed that between the years of 1900 and 1939 were the years Argentinian Cricket was most and highly successful, when touring teams that were high in status and calibre came to town to play the game, one team that’s still very highly regarded today is the Marybelone Cricket Club (M.C.C) which toured there twice. After 1939 World War II cricket in Argentina still was played however it went into a state of decline and hibernation, reaching almost obscurity in the early 1960s. But thanks to its success in the ICC Trophy it started to go back on the up and the sport grew some of its popularity back.

    The domestic cricket season has a highlight, of which is the annual North vs South game which is a 3 day match. Argentina’s first foray into international cricket was when it played against Uruguay in 1868 and 29 of these fixtures were fought up-to World War II (Argentina winning 21 and losing 6). Argentina’s closest rivals to date are Brazil and their history goes back to 1888. Chile is also an opponent with the first game between them and Argentina being in 1893. It was said that the Chilean team took 3 ½ days to reach Santiago by crossing the Andes on mules.

    Tours in which first-class matches (as defined by the Association of Cricket Statisticians and Historians) were played by the following teams:
    1911-1912 MCC (three first-class matches) – MCC were captained by Lord Hawke
    1926-1927 MCC (four first-class matches)
    1929-1930 Sir Julien Cahn’s XI (three first-class matches)
    1937-1938 Sir Theodore Brinkman’s XI (three first-class matches)

    The home-page of Argentinian Cricket can be found by going here -> http://www.cricarg.com/home.htm .

    Cricket Argentina

    Christian Tunon bowling for Argentina

    Agentina National Cricket Team
    *Acknowledgements to Cricinfo.com

    Posted in Argentina, B.A.C.R.C, Belgrano, British Packey, Buenos Aires, county cricket, Evita Peron, Hurlingham, Lomas, Marybelone Cricket Club, North, Rosario, South, South America, St Andrews | Leave a Comment »

    In the International Spotlight…Argentina Cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on February 6, 2008

    In the International Spotlight(no#2)…Argentina Cricket:

    Europe/U.K, Africa, Asia, Australasia and North America….are home to the most recognised cricketing countries in the world today, but what about South America? In each of the regions in the previous sentence there has been at least one country that has qualified for major international cricket events such as the I.C.C Cricket World Cup and the Champions Trophy, but it appears South America isn’t represented. In case some people don’t know South American Cricket is alive and well (to the naked eye) and one of these countries that have fought for recognition in the cricketing world is Argentina.

    This 30+ something million populated Spanish-speaking country is one of the largest countries in South America and while it’s more known for its rugby and soccer national teams, but somewhere in all the fanfare of those sports is Cricket. Cricket first began in this nation as early as 1806. Around that time colonies from Britain were coming into the then newly recognised republic and by 1823 there were approximately 3,000 British persons in Buenos Aires. Of course cricket came along for the ride and the first reference to cricket in that area appeared in the issue of the British Packey (a paper printed in English which was established in 1826). The article that appeared in that issue mentioned that the Buenos Aires Cricket Club was formed by some 25 members who had ‘recently played some superb games of the elegant and brilliant game of cricket’. The Buenos Aires Cricket Club ground, which is situated at Palermo Park, was the area where cricket was mainly focussed, as well as other sports at the time. It was made official in 1864 when a game was played between HMS Bombay and themselves and the home team took the game out by 9 wickets. However, tragedy struck when nearly a week later the HMS Bombay caught fire off the coastal area off Uruguay and with such a tragedy as this there was also an enormous fatality in human lives. It was said to be ironic because in 1948 a prominent Argentinian woman called Evita Peron had the main clubhouse burnt down because of her somewhat “selfish” desire for some welfare scheme of hers. It was said she done this at a fit of rage because of the stubbornness of the Englishmen’s refusal to give the ground up for that scheme of hers.

    As the Englishmen drew further and further into Argentine society the native people gradually took over the main trades that the Englishmen held, and it was them, and the North committee that later moved to Rosario, which is around 322 km northwest of the main city of Buenos Aires. The South committee had always been in Buenos Aires. As this flow of people moved south, the line that divided between the 2 teams was affected to the degree that it was moved right into Buenos Aires itself, until today when it had become somewhat a trial of strength between the clubs. With that came Belgrano and Lomas forming into South and Hurlingham, and also St Andrews and BACRC (Buenos Aires Cricket and Rugby Club)- located in Don Torcuato, formed “North”.
    The official Argentine Cricket Association didn’t form until 1913 and it took 20 years for the organisation for cricket to take control of all organised cricket in the country. Cricket historians have noticed that between the years of 1900 and 1939 were the years Argentinian Cricket was most and highly successful, when touring teams that were high in status and calibre came to town to play the game, one team that’s still very highly regarded today is the Marybelone Cricket Club (M.C.C) which toured there twice. After 1939 World War II cricket in Argentina still was played however it went into a state of decline and hibernation, reaching almost obscurity in the early 1960s. But thanks to its success in the ICC Trophy it started to go back on the up and the sport grew some of its popularity back.

    The domestic cricket season has a highlight, of which is the annual North vs South game which is a 3 day match. Argentina’s first foray into international cricket was when it played against Uruguay in 1868 and 29 of these fixtures were fought up-to World War II (Argentina winning 21 and losing 6). Argentina’s closest rivals to date are Brazil and their history goes back to 1888. Chile is also an opponent with the first game between them and Argentina being in 1893. It was said that the Chilean team took 3 ½ days to reach Santiago by crossing the Andes on mules.

    Tours in which first-class matches (as defined by the Association of Cricket Statisticians and Historians) were played by the following teams:
    1911-1912 MCC (three first-class matches) – MCC were captained by Lord Hawke
    1926-1927 MCC (four first-class matches)
    1929-1930 Sir Julien Cahn’s XI (three first-class matches)
    1937-1938 Sir Theodore Brinkman’s XI (three first-class matches)

    The home-page of Argentinian Cricket can be found by going here -> http://www.cricarg.com/home.htm .

    Cricket Argentina

    Christian Tunon bowling for Argentina

    Agentina National Cricket Team
    *Acknowledgements to Cricinfo.com

    Posted in Argentina, B.A.C.R.C, Belgrano, British Packey, Buenos Aires, county cricket, Evita Peron, Hurlingham, Lomas, Marybelone Cricket Club, North, Rosario, South, South America, St Andrews | Leave a Comment »