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Archive for the ‘Living Legend of cricket’ Category

ESPN Legends of Cricket

Posted by wildkiwi25 on July 2, 2008

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ESPN commemorated the start of the 3rd Millennium by forming an eminent panel to arrive at the list of Top 25 Legends of Cricket. The list was finalized in August 2001 and named as the ESPN Legends of Cricket.

TOP 10:

Players of the 1970s & 1980s are the most heavily represented, with Vivian Richards, Sunil Gavaskar, Dennis Lillee, Imran Khan.

Number 1: Sir Donald Bradman
Number 2: Sir Garfield Sobers
Number 3: Sir Vivian Richards
Number 4: Shane Warne
Number 5: Sir Jack Hobbs
Number 6: Dennis Lillee
Number 7: Sachin Tendulkar
Number 8: Imran Khan
Number 9: Walter Hammond
Number 10: Sunil Gavaskar

11-25:

No. 11: Sir Ian Botham
No. 12: Sir Richard Hadlee
No. 13: Keith Miller
No. 14: WG Grace
No. 15: Graeme Pollock
No. 16: Malcolm Marshall
No. 17: Greg Chappell
No. 18: George Headley
No. 19: Sir Frank Worrell
No. 20: Sir Leonard Hutton
No. 21: Wasim Akram
No. 22: Kapil Dev
No. 23: Steve Waugh
No. 24: Barry Richards
No. 25: Allan Border

26 Through 50:

No. 26: Sydney Barnes
No. 27: Everton Weekes
No. 28: Wilfred Rhodes
No. 29: Herbert Sutcliffe
No. 30: Bill O’Reilly
No. 31: Courtney Walsh
No. 32: Mike Procter
No. 33: Fred Trueman
No. 34: Brian Lara
No. 35: Clyde Walcott
No. 36: Richie Benaud
No. 37: Joel Garner
No. 38: Andy Roberts
No. 39: Curtly Ambrose
No. 40: Michael Holding
No. 41: Glenn McGrath
No. 42: Jim Laker
No. 43: Clarrie Grimmett
No. 44: Javed Miandad
No. 45: Ray Lindwall
No. 46: Victor Trumper
No. 47: Alan Knott
No. 48: Allan Donald
No. 49: Alan Davidson
No. 50: Bishan Bedi

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Posted in ESPN, ESPN Legends of Cricket, Living Legend of cricket | Leave a Comment »

ESPN Legends of Cricket

Posted by wildkiwi25 on July 2, 2008

Photobucket

ESPN commemorated the start of the 3rd Millennium by forming an eminent panel to arrive at the list of Top 25 Legends of Cricket. The list was finalized in August 2001 and named as the ESPN Legends of Cricket.

TOP 10:

Players of the 1970s & 1980s are the most heavily represented, with Vivian Richards, Sunil Gavaskar, Dennis Lillee, Imran Khan.

Number 1: Sir Donald Bradman
Number 2: Sir Garfield Sobers
Number 3: Sir Vivian Richards
Number 4: Shane Warne
Number 5: Sir Jack Hobbs
Number 6: Dennis Lillee
Number 7: Sachin Tendulkar
Number 8: Imran Khan
Number 9: Walter Hammond
Number 10: Sunil Gavaskar

11-25:

No. 11: Sir Ian Botham
No. 12: Sir Richard Hadlee
No. 13: Keith Miller
No. 14: WG Grace
No. 15: Graeme Pollock
No. 16: Malcolm Marshall
No. 17: Greg Chappell
No. 18: George Headley
No. 19: Sir Frank Worrell
No. 20: Sir Leonard Hutton
No. 21: Wasim Akram
No. 22: Kapil Dev
No. 23: Steve Waugh
No. 24: Barry Richards
No. 25: Allan Border

26 Through 50:

No. 26: Sydney Barnes
No. 27: Everton Weekes
No. 28: Wilfred Rhodes
No. 29: Herbert Sutcliffe
No. 30: Bill O’Reilly
No. 31: Courtney Walsh
No. 32: Mike Procter
No. 33: Fred Trueman
No. 34: Brian Lara
No. 35: Clyde Walcott
No. 36: Richie Benaud
No. 37: Joel Garner
No. 38: Andy Roberts
No. 39: Curtly Ambrose
No. 40: Michael Holding
No. 41: Glenn McGrath
No. 42: Jim Laker
No. 43: Clarrie Grimmett
No. 44: Javed Miandad
No. 45: Ray Lindwall
No. 46: Victor Trumper
No. 47: Alan Knott
No. 48: Allan Donald
No. 49: Alan Davidson
No. 50: Bishan Bedi

Posted in ESPN, ESPN Legends of Cricket, Living Legend of cricket | Leave a Comment »

Player Profile(#21)…Sachin Tendulkar(India)

Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 3, 2008

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Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar (Marathi: सचिन रमेश तेंडुलकर) (born April 24, 1973 in Bombay, Maharashtra, India) is an Indian cricketer who is widely regarded as one of the greatest batsmen in the history of cricket. In 2002, Wisden rated him as the second greatest Test batsman after Sir Donald Bradman, and the greatest One-day international batsman.[citation needed]

He holds several highly regarded batting records and is the leading scorer of centuries in both Test cricket and one-day internationals. He is one of the three batsmen to surpass 11,000 runs in Test cricket, and the first Indian to do so. He is the most prolific run scorer in ODIs by a margin of over 4000 runs and has scored the most runs in international cricket as a whole. He crossed 16,000 runs in ODIs on February 5, 2008 while playing against Sri Lanka in Brisbane, Australia. Affectionately called ‘The Little Master’ or ‘The Master Blaster’, Tendulkar made his first-class debut for the Mumbai cricket team aged 14 and scored a century on debut. He made his international test debut in 1989 against Pakistan in Karachi at age 16.

He is the only cricketer to receive the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna, India’s highest sporting honour and the only cricketer and one of the first sportsmen (along with Vishwanathan Anand) to receive the Padma Vibhushan (2008), the second highest civilian honour of India. He is the most sponsored player in world cricket and has a huge fan following even amongst foreign audiences. Tendulkar has made numerous commercial ventures including opening a chain of restaurants in India.

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HIS PLAYING STYLE:

Tendulkar’s batting style has been compared to that of Sir Donald Bradman.

Tendulkar is ambidextrous: He bats, bowls, and throws with his right hand, but writes with his left hand. He also practices left-handed throws at the nets on a regular basis. Cricinfo columnist Sambit Bal has described him as the “most wholesome batsman of his time”. His batting is based on complete balance and poise while limiting unnecessary movements and flourishes. He is strong in hitting the ball to all parts of the field with a large variety of shots. He appears to show little preference for the slow and low wickets which are typical in India, and has scored many centuries on the hard, bouncy pitches in the Caribbean Islands and Australia. He is known for his unique punch style of hitting the ball over square.

Sir Donald Bradman, the greatest batsman of all time, considered Tendulkar to have a batting style similar to his. In his biography, it is stated that “Bradman was most taken by Tendulkar’s technique, compactness and shot production, and had asked his wife to have a look at Tendulkar, having felt that Tendulkar played like him. Bradman’s wife, Jessie, agreed that they did appear similar. “

Former Australian cricket team coach John Buchanan voiced his opinion that Tendulkar had become susceptible to the short ball early in his innings because of a lack of footwork. Buchanan also believes Tendulkar has a weakness while playing left-arm pace. He was affected by a series of injuries since 2004. Since then Tendulkar’s batting has tended to be less attacking. Explaining this change in his batting style, he has acknowledged that he is batting differently due to that fact that (1) No batsman can bat the same way for the entire length of a long career and (2) He is a senior member of the team now and thus has more responsibility. However, it cannot be denied that his batting became less attractive since 2004 and while a string of his highest scores have come within this time period, the consistency has been lacking.[citation needed] During the early part of his career he was a more attacking batsman and frequently scored centuries at over a run a ball. Ian Chappell, former Australian player, believes “Tendulkar now, is nothing like the player he was when he was a young bloke”. However, during the latest tour of Australia in 2008, Tendulkar displayed glimpses of his attacking style with several masterful innings.

While Tendulkar is not a regular bowler, he is adept at bowling medium pace, leg spin, and off spin with equal ease. He often bowls when two batsmen of the opposite team have been batting together for a long period, and he can often be a useful partnership breaker. With his bowling, he has helped secure an Indian victory on more than one occasion.

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EARLY YEARS AND PERSONAL LIFE:

Tendulkar was born in in Mumbai . His father, Ramesh Tendulkar, who was a Marathi novelist, named him after his favorite music director, Sachin Dev Burman. Tendulkar’s elder brother, Ajit, encouraged him to play cricket. Tendulkar has two other siblings: brother, Nitin, and sister, Savitai.

Tendulkar attended Sharadashram Vidyamandir (High School), where he began his cricketing career under the guidance of his coach and mentor, Ramakant Achrekar. During his school days, he attended the MRF Pace Foundation to train as a fast bowler, but the fast bowling trainer there, Dennis Lillee, suggested to him to “just focus” on his batting.

When Tendulkar was young, he would practice for hours with his coach. He would often get bored of practicing. So his coach would put a one-Rupee-coin on the top of the stumps. The bowler who dismissed Sachin would get the coin. If Sachin passed the whole session without getting dismissed, the coach would give him the coin. Sachin says today that the 13 coins he won then are his most prized possessions.

While at school, he was involved in unbroken 664-run partnership in a Harris Shield game in 1988 with friend and team mate Vinod Kambli, who also went on to represent India. The destructive pair reduced one bowler to tears and made the rest of the opposition unwilling to continue the game. Sachin scored over 320 in this innings and scored over a thousand runs in the tournament. This was the record partnership in any form of cricket, until 2006 when it was broken by two under-13 batsmen in a match held at Hyderabad in India. When he was 14 Indian batting maestro Sunil Gavaskar gave him a pair of his used ultra light pads. “It was the greatest source of encouragement for me,” he said nearly 20 years later after passing Gavaskar’s top world record of 34 Test centuries.

In 1995, Sachin Tendulkar married Anjali (born 10 November 1967), the paediatrician daughter of Gujarati industrialist, Anand Mehta. They have two children, Sara (born 12 October 1997), and Arjun (born 24 September 1999).

Tendulkar sponsors 200 underprivileged children every year through Apnalaya, a Mumbai-based NGO associated with his mother-in-law, Annaben Mehta. He is reluctant to speak about his charitable activities[citation needed], choosing to preserve the sanctity of his personal life despite media interest in him.[citation needed]

In commemorating Sachin Tendulkar’s feat of equalling Don Bradman’s 29 centuries in Test Cricket, automotive giant Ferrari invited Sachin Tendulkar to its paddock in Silverstone on the eve of the British Grand Prix (23 July 2002) to receive a Ferrari 360 Modena from the legendary F1 racer Michael Schumacher. On September 4, 2002 India’s then finance minister Jaswant Singh wrote to Sachin telling him that the government will waive custom’s duty imposed on the car as a measure to applaud his feat. However the rules at the time stated that the customs duty can be waived only when receiving an automobile as a prize and not as a gift. It is claimed that the proposals to change the law (Customs Act) was put forth in Financial Bill in February 2003 and amended was passed as a law in May 2003. Subsequently the Ferrari was allowed to be brought to India without payment of the customs duty (Rs 1.13 Crores or 120% on the car value of Rs 75 Lakhs). When the move to waive customs duty became public in July 2003, political and social activists protested the waiver and filed PIL in the Delhi High Court. With the controversy snowballing, Sachin offered to pay the customs duty and the tab was finally picked up by Ferrari. Tendulkar has been seen taking his Ferrari 360 Modena for late-night drives in Mumbai.

More information about Sachin can be found here —>>

  • List of International cricket centuries by Sachin Tendulkar
  • Indian cricket team
  • Wisden Cricketers of the Year
  • List of One-day International records
  • Cricinfo Profile for Sachin Tendulkar
  • Sachin Tendulkar |Life, Legend and Beyond
  • Sachin Tendulkar Fan Club
  • Sachin Tendulkar

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org, Cricinfo.com and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Batsman, Centuries, Greatest Batsman, India, Living Legend of cricket, MRF, Mumbai, Sachin Tendulkar, The Little Master, The Master Blaster | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#21)…Sachin Tendulkar(India)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 2, 2008

    Photobucket

    Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar (Marathi: सचिन रमेश तेंडुलकर) (born April 24, 1973 in Bombay, Maharashtra, India) is an Indian cricketer who is widely regarded as one of the greatest batsmen in the history of cricket. In 2002, Wisden rated him as the second greatest Test batsman after Sir Donald Bradman, and the greatest One-day international batsman.[citation needed]

    He holds several highly regarded batting records and is the leading scorer of centuries in both Test cricket and one-day internationals. He is one of the three batsmen to surpass 11,000 runs in Test cricket, and the first Indian to do so. He is the most prolific run scorer in ODIs by a margin of over 4000 runs and has scored the most runs in international cricket as a whole. He crossed 16,000 runs in ODIs on February 5, 2008 while playing against Sri Lanka in Brisbane, Australia. Affectionately called ‘The Little Master’ or ‘The Master Blaster’, Tendulkar made his first-class debut for the Mumbai cricket team aged 14 and scored a century on debut. He made his international test debut in 1989 against Pakistan in Karachi at age 16.

    He is the only cricketer to receive the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna, India’s highest sporting honour and the only cricketer and one of the first sportsmen (along with Vishwanathan Anand) to receive the Padma Vibhushan (2008), the second highest civilian honour of India. He is the most sponsored player in world cricket and has a huge fan following even amongst foreign audiences. Tendulkar has made numerous commercial ventures including opening a chain of restaurants in India.

    Photobucket

    HIS PLAYING STYLE:

    Tendulkar’s batting style has been compared to that of Sir Donald Bradman.

    Tendulkar is ambidextrous: He bats, bowls, and throws with his right hand, but writes with his left hand. He also practices left-handed throws at the nets on a regular basis. Cricinfo columnist Sambit Bal has described him as the “most wholesome batsman of his time”. His batting is based on complete balance and poise while limiting unnecessary movements and flourishes. He is strong in hitting the ball to all parts of the field with a large variety of shots. He appears to show little preference for the slow and low wickets which are typical in India, and has scored many centuries on the hard, bouncy pitches in the Caribbean Islands and Australia. He is known for his unique punch style of hitting the ball over square.

    Sir Donald Bradman, the greatest batsman of all time, considered Tendulkar to have a batting style similar to his. In his biography, it is stated that “Bradman was most taken by Tendulkar’s technique, compactness and shot production, and had asked his wife to have a look at Tendulkar, having felt that Tendulkar played like him. Bradman’s wife, Jessie, agreed that they did appear similar. “

    Former Australian cricket team coach John Buchanan voiced his opinion that Tendulkar had become susceptible to the short ball early in his innings because of a lack of footwork. Buchanan also believes Tendulkar has a weakness while playing left-arm pace. He was affected by a series of injuries since 2004. Since then Tendulkar’s batting has tended to be less attacking. Explaining this change in his batting style, he has acknowledged that he is batting differently due to that fact that (1) No batsman can bat the same way for the entire length of a long career and (2) He is a senior member of the team now and thus has more responsibility. However, it cannot be denied that his batting became less attractive since 2004 and while a string of his highest scores have come within this time period, the consistency has been lacking.[citation needed] During the early part of his career he was a more attacking batsman and frequently scored centuries at over a run a ball. Ian Chappell, former Australian player, believes “Tendulkar now, is nothing like the player he was when he was a young bloke”. However, during the latest tour of Australia in 2008, Tendulkar displayed glimpses of his attacking style with several masterful innings.

    While Tendulkar is not a regular bowler, he is adept at bowling medium pace, leg spin, and off spin with equal ease. He often bowls when two batsmen of the opposite team have been batting together for a long period, and he can often be a useful partnership breaker. With his bowling, he has helped secure an Indian victory on more than one occasion.

    Photobucket

    EARLY YEARS AND PERSONAL LIFE:

    Tendulkar was born in in Mumbai . His father, Ramesh Tendulkar, who was a Marathi novelist, named him after his favorite music director, Sachin Dev Burman. Tendulkar’s elder brother, Ajit, encouraged him to play cricket. Tendulkar has two other siblings: brother, Nitin, and sister, Savitai.

    Tendulkar attended Sharadashram Vidyamandir (High School), where he began his cricketing career under the guidance of his coach and mentor, Ramakant Achrekar. During his school days, he attended the MRF Pace Foundation to train as a fast bowler, but the fast bowling trainer there, Dennis Lillee, suggested to him to “just focus” on his batting.

    When Tendulkar was young, he would practice for hours with his coach. He would often get bored of practicing. So his coach would put a one-Rupee-coin on the top of the stumps. The bowler who dismissed Sachin would get the coin. If Sachin passed the whole session without getting dismissed, the coach would give him the coin. Sachin says today that the 13 coins he won then are his most prized possessions.

    While at school, he was involved in unbroken 664-run partnership in a Harris Shield game in 1988 with friend and team mate Vinod Kambli, who also went on to represent India. The destructive pair reduced one bowler to tears and made the rest of the opposition unwilling to continue the game. Sachin scored over 320 in this innings and scored over a thousand runs in the tournament. This was the record partnership in any form of cricket, until 2006 when it was broken by two under-13 batsmen in a match held at Hyderabad in India. When he was 14 Indian batting maestro Sunil Gavaskar gave him a pair of his used ultra light pads. “It was the greatest source of encouragement for me,” he said nearly 20 years later after passing Gavaskar’s top world record of 34 Test centuries.

    In 1995, Sachin Tendulkar married Anjali (born 10 November 1967), the paediatrician daughter of Gujarati industrialist, Anand Mehta. They have two children, Sara (born 12 October 1997), and Arjun (born 24 September 1999).

    Tendulkar sponsors 200 underprivileged children every year through Apnalaya, a Mumbai-based NGO associated with his mother-in-law, Annaben Mehta. He is reluctant to speak about his charitable activities[citation needed], choosing to preserve the sanctity of his personal life despite media interest in him.[citation needed]

    In commemorating Sachin Tendulkar’s feat of equalling Don Bradman’s 29 centuries in Test Cricket, automotive giant Ferrari invited Sachin Tendulkar to its paddock in Silverstone on the eve of the British Grand Prix (23 July 2002) to receive a Ferrari 360 Modena from the legendary F1 racer Michael Schumacher. On September 4, 2002 India’s then finance minister Jaswant Singh wrote to Sachin telling him that the government will waive custom’s duty imposed on the car as a measure to applaud his feat. However the rules at the time stated that the customs duty can be waived only when receiving an automobile as a prize and not as a gift. It is claimed that the proposals to change the law (Customs Act) was put forth in Financial Bill in February 2003 and amended was passed as a law in May 2003. Subsequently the Ferrari was allowed to be brought to India without payment of the customs duty (Rs 1.13 Crores or 120% on the car value of Rs 75 Lakhs). When the move to waive customs duty became public in July 2003, political and social activists protested the waiver and filed PIL in the Delhi High Court. With the controversy snowballing, Sachin offered to pay the customs duty and the tab was finally picked up by Ferrari. Tendulkar has been seen taking his Ferrari 360 Modena for late-night drives in Mumbai.

    More information about Sachin can be found here —>>

  • List of International cricket centuries by Sachin Tendulkar
  • Indian cricket team
  • Wisden Cricketers of the Year
  • List of One-day International records
  • Cricinfo Profile for Sachin Tendulkar
  • Sachin Tendulkar |Life, Legend and Beyond
  • Sachin Tendulkar Fan Club
  • Sachin Tendulkar
  • Posted in Batsman, Centuries, Greatest Batsman, India, Living Legend of cricket, MRF, Mumbai, Sachin Tendulkar, The Little Master, The Master Blaster | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#20)…Shane Warne(Australia)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on April 27, 2008

    Photobucket

    Photobucket

    Shane Keith Warne (born 13 September 1969) is a former Australian international cricketer who is widely regarded as one of the finest leg spin bowlers in the history of cricket. While his career statistics suggest that, despite his aggregate performances, phenomenal popularity and notoriety, he was perhaps less effective and destructive than the interbellum Australian leg-spinners Bill O’Reilly and Clarrie Grimmett, his durability and impact on the modern game assure his place alongside them in cricket’s pantheon. Indeed, in 2000, he was selected by a panel of cricket experts as one of the five Wisden Cricketers of the Century, the only bowler selected in the quintet.

    Warne played his first Test match in 1992, and his 708 wickets was the record for the most wickets taken by any bowler in Test cricket, until it was broken by Sri Lanka’s Muttiah Muralitharan on December 3, 2007. He took over 1000 international wickets (in Tests and One-Day Internationals)—he was the second bowler to reach this milestone after Muttiah Muralitharan. A useful lower-order batsman, Warne also scored over 3000 Test runs, and he holds the record for most Test runs without a century. His career was plagued by scandals off the field; these included a ban from cricket for testing positive for a prohibited substance, and charges of bringing the game into disrepute.

    As well as Australia, he also played Australian domestic cricket for his home state of Victoria, and English domestic cricket for Hampshire. He was captain of Hampshire for three seasons, from 2005 to 2007. In March 2008, Warne signed to play in the Indian Premier League for the Jaipur team, Rajasthan Royals in the first edition of the tournament, where he will play the roles of both captain and coach.

    He retired from international cricket in January 2007, at the end of Australia’s 5-0 Ashes series victory over England. Two other players integral to the Australian team of recent years, Glenn McGrath and Justin Langer, also retired from Tests on the same day which led some, including the Australian captain, Ricky Ponting, to declare it the “end of an era”.

    Following his retirement from international cricket, Warne played a full season at Hampshire in 2007. He had been scheduled to appear in the 2008 English cricket season, but in late March 2008 he announced his retirement from playing first-class cricket in order to be able to spend more time pursuing interests outside of cricket.

  • Cricket-Online player profile – Shane Warne
  • Player Profile: Shane Warne from Cricinfo
  • Cricket Australia media release congratulating Warne on 500th wicket
  • 10 photos of milestone wickets in Warne’s career
  • VB Warnie – Summer of Spin
  • Ball of the Century
  • List of cricket incidents
  • List of sportspeople sanctioned for doping offences
  • Statsguru – Shane K Warne – Test Bowling – List of wickets

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to owners of pictures used, Wikipedia.org, Cricinfo.com

  • Posted in 700 Wickets, Australia, Baggy Green, Hampshire, Indian Premier League, Jaipur, Leg spin, Living Legend of cricket, Rajasthan Royals, Shane Warne, Victoria | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#20)…Shane Warne(Australia)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on April 27, 2008

    Photobucket

    Photobucket

    Shane Keith Warne (born 13 September 1969) is a former Australian international cricketer who is widely regarded as one of the finest leg spin bowlers in the history of cricket. While his career statistics suggest that, despite his aggregate performances, phenomenal popularity and notoriety, he was perhaps less effective and destructive than the interbellum Australian leg-spinners Bill O’Reilly and Clarrie Grimmett, his durability and impact on the modern game assure his place alongside them in cricket’s pantheon. Indeed, in 2000, he was selected by a panel of cricket experts as one of the five Wisden Cricketers of the Century, the only bowler selected in the quintet.

    Warne played his first Test match in 1992, and his 708 wickets was the record for the most wickets taken by any bowler in Test cricket, until it was broken by Sri Lanka’s Muttiah Muralitharan on December 3, 2007. He took over 1000 international wickets (in Tests and One-Day Internationals)—he was the second bowler to reach this milestone after Muttiah Muralitharan. A useful lower-order batsman, Warne also scored over 3000 Test runs, and he holds the record for most Test runs without a century. His career was plagued by scandals off the field; these included a ban from cricket for testing positive for a prohibited substance, and charges of bringing the game into disrepute.

    As well as Australia, he also played Australian domestic cricket for his home state of Victoria, and English domestic cricket for Hampshire. He was captain of Hampshire for three seasons, from 2005 to 2007. In March 2008, Warne signed to play in the Indian Premier League for the Jaipur team, Rajasthan Royals in the first edition of the tournament, where he will play the roles of both captain and coach.

    He retired from international cricket in January 2007, at the end of Australia’s 5-0 Ashes series victory over England. Two other players integral to the Australian team of recent years, Glenn McGrath and Justin Langer, also retired from Tests on the same day which led some, including the Australian captain, Ricky Ponting, to declare it the “end of an era”.

    Following his retirement from international cricket, Warne played a full season at Hampshire in 2007. He had been scheduled to appear in the 2008 English cricket season, but in late March 2008 he announced his retirement from playing first-class cricket in order to be able to spend more time pursuing interests outside of cricket.

  • Cricket-Online player profile – Shane Warne
  • Player Profile: Shane Warne from Cricinfo
  • Cricket Australia media release congratulating Warne on 500th wicket
  • 10 photos of milestone wickets in Warne’s career
  • VB Warnie – Summer of Spin
  • Ball of the Century
  • List of cricket incidents
  • List of sportspeople sanctioned for doping offences
  • Statsguru – Shane K Warne – Test Bowling – List of wickets

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to owners of pictures used, Wikipedia.org, Cricinfo.com

  • Posted in 700 Wickets, Australia, Baggy Green, Hampshire, Indian Premier League, Jaipur, Leg spin, Living Legend of cricket, Rajasthan Royals, Shane Warne, Victoria | Leave a Comment »