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Archive for the ‘Indian Premier League’ Category

What is Twenty20 cricket?

Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 28, 2008

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Twenty20 is a form of cricket, originally introduced in the United Kingdom for professional inter-county competition by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB), in 2003. A Twenty20 game involves two teams, each have a single innings, batting for a maximum of 20 overs.

A Twenty20 game is completed in about two and half hours, with each innings lasting around 75 minutes, thus bringing the game closer to the timespan of other popular team sports such as football. It was introduced to create a lively form of the game which would be attractive to spectators at the ground and viewers on television and as such it has been very successful. The ECB did not intend that Twenty20 would replace other forms of cricket and these have continued alongside it.

Since its inception the game has spread around the cricket world. On most international tours there is a Twenty20 match and most Test-playing nations have a domestic cup competition. The inaugural World Twenty20 was played in South Africa in 2007 with India defeating Pakistan in the final. The Indian Premier League is currently the largest and most popular (in terms of attendance and television audience) Twenty20 league in the world.

History:

Origins

The idea of a shortened format of the game was discussed by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) in 1998 and 2001.

When the Benson & Hedges Cup ended in 2002, the ECB needed another one day competition to fill its place. The cricketing authorities were looking to boost the games popularity with the younger generation in response to dwindling crowds and reduced sponsorship. It was intended to deliver fast paced, exciting cricket accessible to thousands of fans who were put off by the longer versions of the game.

Twenty20 cricket was formally introduced in 2003 when the ECB launched the Twenty20 Cup and was marketed with the slogan “I don’t like cricket, I love it”.

Twenty20 Worldwide:
On 12 January 2005 Australia’s first Twenty20 game was played at the WACA Ground between the Western Warriors and the Victorian Bushrangers. It drew a sellout crowd of 20,700.

Starting 11 July 2006 19 West Indies regional teams competed in what was named the Stanford 20/20 tournament. The event has been financially backed by billionaire Allen Stanford, who gave at least US$28,000,000 funding money. West Indies legends also backed the programme, and several “looked after” the teams during their stay in and around the purpose built ground in Antigua. It is intended that the tournament will be an annual event. Guyana won the inaugural event, defeating Trinidad and Tobago by 5 wickets. The top prize for the winning team was US$1,000,000, but other prizes were given throughout the tournament, such as play of the match (US$10,000) and man of the match (US$25,000).

On 1st of November 2008 the Superstars 101-0 West Indies team beat England 99 by 10 wickets. England slumped to 33-4 and then 65-8 after 15 overs before Samit Patel’s 22 took them to 99 in 19.5 overs, still easily their lowest Twenty20 total. Chris Gayle got an amazing 65 runs not out.

On 5 January 2007 Queensland Bulls played the New South Wales Blues at The Gabba, Brisbane. A crowd of 11,000 was expected based on pre-match ticket sales. However, an unexpected 16,000 turned up on the day to buy tickets, causing disruption and confusion for surprised Gabba staff as they were forced to throw open gates and grant many fans free entry. Attendance reached 27,653.

For 1 February 2008’s Twenty20 match between Australia and India, the Melbourne Cricket Ground was sold out based on pre-ticket sales and 84,041 people attended the match involving the Twenty20 World Champions against the ODI World Champions.

Twenty20 Internationals:
On 17 February 2005 Australia defeated New Zealand in the first men’s full international Twenty20 match, played at Eden Park in Auckland. The game was played in a light-hearted manner – both sides turned out in kit similar to that worn in the 1980s, the New Zealand team’s a direct copy of that worn by the Beige Brigade. Some of the players also sported moustaches/beards and hair styles popular in the 1980s taking part in a competition amongst themselves for best retro look, at the request of the Beige Brigade. Australia won the game comprehensively, and as the result became obvious towards the end of the NZ innings, the players and umpires took things less seriously – Glenn McGrath jokingly replayed the Trevor Chappell underarm incident from a 1981 ODI between the two sides, and Billy Bowden showed him a mock red card (red cards are not normally used in cricket) in response.

The first Twenty20 international in England was played between England and Australia at the Rose Bowl in Hampshire on the 13 June 2005, which England won by a record margin of 100 runs.

On 9 January 2006 Australia and South Africa met in the first international Twenty20 game in Australia. In a first, each player’s nickname appeared on the back of his uniform, rather than his surname. The international match drew a crowd of 38,894 people at the The Gabba. Australia convincingly won the match with man of the match Damien Martyn scoring 96 runs.

On 16 February 2006 New Zealand defeated West Indies in a tie-breaking bowl-out 3-0; 126 runs were scored apiece in the game proper. The game was the last international match played by Chris Cairns – NZC handed out life-size cardboard masks of his face to patrons as they entered the ground.

Criticism:
Although the format has proved successful, it is not without its critics. Purists[who?] feel that Twenty20 waters down the sport and draws attention away from the more serious and technical arm of the sport, first-class cricket and Test Cricket.

It is also argued that since Twenty20 encourages far-from-technical cricket, youngsters wanting to pick up the game will be misguided into believing that cricket is all about trying to hit 6’s and 4’s no matter how you do it. Also it may create the misconception that cricket is a batsman’s game and there is little incentive learning how to bowl, since it is the bowlers that are usually at the receiving end, leading to fewer youngsters taking up bowling.

Rules of Twenty20 Cricket:

A Twenty20 game involves two teams, each have a single innings, batting for a maximum of 20 overs.

The Laws of cricket apply to Twenty20 with some exceptions:

  • Each bowler may bowl a maximum of only one-fifth of the total overs per innings (generally four, for a full, uninterrupted game). i.e., 4 in the 20 overs
  • Should a bowler deliver a no ball by overstepping the popping crease, it costs 1 run and his next delivery is designated a “free-hit”, from which the batsman can only be dismissed through a run out, as is the case for the original “no ball”. (Strictly speaking, the almost never seen methods of dismissal from a “no ball” — for hitting the ball twice, obstructing the field or handling the ball — also apply to the “free-hit” delivery.)
  • Umpires may award five-run penalty runs at their discretion if they believe either team is wasting time.
  • The following fielding restrictions apply:
    -No more than five fielders can be on the leg side at any time.
    -During the first six overs, a maximum of two fielders can be outside the 30-yard circle.
    -After the first six overs, a maximum of five fielders can be outside the fielding circle.
  • If the fielding team doesn’t start to bowl their 20th over within 75 minutes, the batting side is credited an extra six runs for every whole over bowled after the 75 minute mark; the umpire may add more time to this, if he or she considers the batting team is wasting time.
  • If the match ends with the scores tied and there must be a winner, the tie is broken with a one over per side “Eliminator” or “Super Over”. Each team nominates three batsmen and one bowler to play a one over “mini-match”. In turn, each side bats one over bowled by the one nominated opposition bowler, with their innings over if they loses two wickets before the over is completed. The side with the higher score from their over wins.
  • If the teams finish tied on runs scored in that one over, the side with the higher number of sixes in its full innings and in the one-over eliminator will be declared the winner. If the teams are still tied, the one with the higher number of fours in both innings will win.

    Twenty20 Records:

  • Highest individual score – Brendon McCullum (Kolkata) 158* (73) (2008 IPL)
  • Highest team total – Sri Lanka 260/6 (20 overs) (2007 ICC World Twenty20)
  • Most sixes in an innings – Graham Napier (Essex) 16 (2008 Twenty20 Cup)
  • Most sixes in career – David Hussey 63
  • Fastest hundred – Andrew Symonds (Kent) 34 balls (2004 Twenty20 Cup)
  • Fastest fifty – Yuvraj Singh 12 balls (2007 ICC World Twenty20)
  • Most hundreds – Ian Harvey 3
  • Best innings bowling figures – Sohail Tanvir (Rajasthan) 6/14 (2008 IPL)
  • Highest Paid – M.S.Dhoni (Chennai) 5.8 million US dollars (2008 IPL)
  • Most runs in one over – Flag of India Yuvraj Sing 36, 6 balls 6 sixes (2007 ICC World Twenty20)

    Links to more information and records on Twenty20 Cricket:
  • The Twenty20 Cup
  • List of Twenty20 International Records
  • List of Twenty20 International Games
  • The history of Twenty20 Cricket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

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    Posted in How to play twenty20 cricket, Indian Premier League, Rules of Twenty20 Cricket, Sir Allen Stanford, Stanford 20/20, twenty20, Twenty20 Cricket, What is Twenty20 Cricket | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#42)…Makhaya Ntini (South Africa)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 26, 2008

    Photobucket

    Makhaya Ntini (born 6 July 1977 in Eastern Cape Province) is a South African cricketer who was the first ethnically black player to play for the South African team. A fast bowler, he tends to bowl from wide of the crease with brisk, although not express, pace. He has survived legal controversy early on in his career to become only the third South African to take 300 Test wickets after Shaun Pollock and Allan Donald, and to reach second place in the ICC test match bowling ratings. He plays domestic cricket for the Chennai Super Kings in the Indian Premier League.

    Background:
    Ntini came from humble beginnings where he tended cattle in his home village of Mdingi in the Eastern Cape. It was there that his talent was discovered and he was sent to Dale College in King William’s Town where he would develop his game. His action was intentionally modelled on West Indian great Malcolm Marshall.[citation needed] After a brief spell with Border his break came courtesy of an injury to Roger Telemachus and Ntini was included in the South African squad to tour Australia late in 1997. His international début came on January 16th at Perth against New Zealand where he took 2/30 off his full quota of 10 overs. A couple of months later, on March 19th, he made history by becoming the first black South African Test cricketer (though not the first non-White cricketer, as bi-racial Charles Llewellyn made his Test début in 1896). The Test match was at home in Cape Town against Sri Lanka and his maiden wicket was Aravinda De Silva who would be one of his 2 wickets in the game.

    Controversy:
    His career looked like coming to an end in 1999 when Ntini was charged and then convicted of rape. The case caused widespread controversy in South Africa with his conviction generating negative publicty in view of his status as the first black South African Test cricketer. Ntini maintained his innocence and was acquitted on appeal and looked to rebuild his international cricket career.

    International career:
    Ntini returned to the South African side for a Sharjah tournament in 2000. His improvement was clear as he bowled with greater control. In 2003 he became the first South African to take 10 wickets at Lord’s Cricket Ground. Arguably his best performance, however, came on 12 April 2005, when Ntini took 13 wickets for 132 runs against the West Indies at Port of Spain. This remains the best bowling performance by a South African cricketer in a Test match. On 3 March 2006, Ntini also achieved the best bowling figures by a South African in an ODI, demolishing Australia with 6 wickets for 22 runs. Ntini is a popular figure in South African sport and he was voted their favourite sportsman in a research poll conducted by the South Africa Press Association.

    From recent performances, Ntini has established himself as South Africa’s premier fast bowler and one of the leading fast bowlers in the world. As of December 2007 he is ranked as the world’s third-best Test bowler behind Muttiah Muralitharan and Stuart Clark, and ninth-best ODI bowler, according to the ICC rankings.

    On 20 January 2007 Ntini dislodged Mohammed Sami to take his 300th test wicket, in his 74th test. On 1 August 2008 he removed England opener Alistair Cook to claim his 350th test wicket in his 90th test.

    Links to more information on Makhaya Ntini:

  • Cricinfo.com Profile on Makhaya Ntini
  • Southafrica.info Page on Makhaya Ntini
  • Makhaya Ntini Bio Page
  • Makhaya Ntini: Stats, Pics, Articles, Interviews and Milestones on Cricketfundas.com

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Chennai Super Kings, Dale College, Eastern Cape, Eastern Cape Province, Indian Premier League, Makhaya Ntini, South Africa | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#42)…Makhaya Ntini (South Africa)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 26, 2008

    Photobucket

    Makhaya Ntini (born 6 July 1977 in Eastern Cape Province) is a South African cricketer who was the first ethnically black player to play for the South African team. A fast bowler, he tends to bowl from wide of the crease with brisk, although not express, pace. He has survived legal controversy early on in his career to become only the third South African to take 300 Test wickets after Shaun Pollock and Allan Donald, and to reach second place in the ICC test match bowling ratings. He plays domestic cricket for the Chennai Super Kings in the Indian Premier League.

    Background:
    Ntini came from humble beginnings where he tended cattle in his home village of Mdingi in the Eastern Cape. It was there that his talent was discovered and he was sent to Dale College in King William’s Town where he would develop his game. His action was intentionally modelled on West Indian great Malcolm Marshall.[citation needed] After a brief spell with Border his break came courtesy of an injury to Roger Telemachus and Ntini was included in the South African squad to tour Australia late in 1997. His international début came on January 16th at Perth against New Zealand where he took 2/30 off his full quota of 10 overs. A couple of months later, on March 19th, he made history by becoming the first black South African Test cricketer (though not the first non-White cricketer, as bi-racial Charles Llewellyn made his Test début in 1896). The Test match was at home in Cape Town against Sri Lanka and his maiden wicket was Aravinda De Silva who would be one of his 2 wickets in the game.

    Controversy:
    His career looked like coming to an end in 1999 when Ntini was charged and then convicted of rape. The case caused widespread controversy in South Africa with his conviction generating negative publicty in view of his status as the first black South African Test cricketer. Ntini maintained his innocence and was acquitted on appeal and looked to rebuild his international cricket career.

    International career:
    Ntini returned to the South African side for a Sharjah tournament in 2000. His improvement was clear as he bowled with greater control. In 2003 he became the first South African to take 10 wickets at Lord’s Cricket Ground. Arguably his best performance, however, came on 12 April 2005, when Ntini took 13 wickets for 132 runs against the West Indies at Port of Spain. This remains the best bowling performance by a South African cricketer in a Test match. On 3 March 2006, Ntini also achieved the best bowling figures by a South African in an ODI, demolishing Australia with 6 wickets for 22 runs. Ntini is a popular figure in South African sport and he was voted their favourite sportsman in a research poll conducted by the South Africa Press Association.

    From recent performances, Ntini has established himself as South Africa’s premier fast bowler and one of the leading fast bowlers in the world. As of December 2007 he is ranked as the world’s third-best Test bowler behind Muttiah Muralitharan and Stuart Clark, and ninth-best ODI bowler, according to the ICC rankings.

    On 20 January 2007 Ntini dislodged Mohammed Sami to take his 300th test wicket, in his 74th test. On 1 August 2008 he removed England opener Alistair Cook to claim his 350th test wicket in his 90th test.

    Links to more information on Makhaya Ntini:

  • Cricinfo.com Profile on Makhaya Ntini
  • Southafrica.info Page on Makhaya Ntini
  • Makhaya Ntini Bio Page
  • Makhaya Ntini: Stats, Pics, Articles, Interviews and Milestones on Cricketfundas.com

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Chennai Super Kings, Dale College, Eastern Cape, Eastern Cape Province, Indian Premier League, Makhaya Ntini, South Africa | Leave a Comment »

    Introducing…the Indian Premier League

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 30, 2008

    Photobucket

    The Indian Premier League (also known as the “DLF Indian Premier League” and often abbreviated as IPL), is a Twenty20 cricket competition created by the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and chaired by the Chairman & Commisoner IPL, BCCI Vice President Lalit Modi. The first season of the Indian Premier League commenced on 18 April 2008, and ended on 1 June 2008 with the victory of the Rajasthan Royals in the final at the DY Patil Stadium, Navi Mumbai.

    Teams play each other two times in a round robin system, with equal number of home and away matches. The top four ranking sides will progress to the semi-finals.

    The inaugural 2008 tournament started on 18 April 2008 in Bangalore and lasted for 46 days, with 59 matches scheduled, out of which 58 took place and 1 was washed out due to rain

    Television rights and sponsorship:

    The IPL will bring the BCCI income of US$1 billion, over a period of five to ten years, reinforcing its status as the richest board in world cricket.

    All of these revenues are directed to a central pool, 40% of which will go to IPL itself, 54% to franchisees and 6% as prize money. The money will be distributed in these proportions until 2017, after which the share of IPL will be 50%, franchisees 45% and prize money 5%.

    Television rights:

    On 15 January 2008 it was announced that a consortium consisting of India’s Sony Entertainment Television network and Singapore-based World Sport Group secured the global broadcasting rights of the Indian Premier League. The record deal has a duration of ten years at a cost of US $1.026 billion. As part of the deal, the consortium will pay the BCCI US $918 million for the television broadcast rights and US $108 million for the promotion of the tournament.

    20% of these proceeds would go to IPL, 8% as prize money and 72% would be distributed to the franchisees. The money would be distributed in these proportions until 2012, after which the IPL would go public and list its shares. Sony-WSG then re-sold parts of the broadcasting rights geographically to other companies.

    Rules:
    The official rules for the tournament are here. Some of the Team composition rules are:

  • Total squad strength of 16 players plus one physio and a coach.
  • No more than 8 foreign players in the squad and at most 4 in the playing XI.
  • A minimum of 4 local players must be included in each team.
  • No fewer than 4 players from the BCCI under-22 pool in each team.

    The players accorded “icon” status are: Sachin Tendulkar, Rahul Dravid, Sourav Ganguly, Yuvraj Singh and Virender Sehwag . The total spending cap for a franchisee in the first player auction was US $5m. Under-22 players are to be remunerated with a minimum annual salary of US $20,000 while for others it is US $50,000. Icon players are to be paid 15% more than the highest paid player in their respective teams.

    Franchises:
    The winning bidders for the eight franchises were announced on 24 January 2008. While the total base price for auction was US $400 million, the auction fetched US $723.59 million. The official list of franchise owners announced and the winning bids were as follows.

  • Mumbai Indians
    Owned by: Reliance Industries Limited (Mukesh Ambani)($111.9 million)
  • Royal Challengers Bangalore
    Owned by: UB group (Vijay Mallya)($111.6 million)
  • Hyderabad Deccan Chargers
    Owned by: Deccan Chronicle (T Venkatarami Reddy)($107 million)
  • Chennai Super Kings
    Owned by: India Cements (N Srinivasan)($91 million)
  • Delhi Daredevils
    Owned by: GMR Holdings (Grandhi Mallikarjuna Rao)($84 million)
  • Kings XI Punjab
    Owned by: Preity Zinta, Ness Wadia (Bombay Dyeing), Karan Paul (Apeejay Surendera Group) and Mohit Burman (Dabur)($76 million)
  • Kolkata Knight Riders
    Owned by: Red Chillies Entertainment (Shahrukh Khan, Juhi Chawla Mehta and Jai Mehta)($75.09 million)
  • Rajasthan Royals
    Owned by: Emerging Media (A.R Jha, Lachlan Murdoch, Suresh Chellaram)($67 million)

    Future Expansion:
    After the success of the first season, it has been reported that four new franchises will join the IPL in 2010-11, increasing the total number of teams to 12. The new confirmed franchises will be based in Ahmedabad and Kanpur, with Anil Ambani’s name associated with the ownership of the Ahmedabad franchise, and Sahara Group is touted as the possible suitors to buy the Kanpur franchise. Other cities being linked with getting a franchisee are Patna-Ranchi joined franchisee or a team from the North-East to promote the sport in the region and possibly one team from the north-western states of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarkhand. A second Mumbai or Delhi team has also been proposed for future expansion of two teams to take place in the 2012-13 season.

    Expansions- 2010-11 Season( 4 new teams)-

  • IPL Ahmedabad
  • IPL Kanpur
  • Any two from the following-

    1. A Patna-Ranchi joined franchisee 2. A team from the North-East 3. A team from the north-western states of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarkhand

    The unselected team from the 3 will be considered for the next set of expansions in the 2012-13 season.

    2012-13 Season( 2 new teams)-

  • The unselected 3rd team from above
  • Possibly a second franchisee from Delhi’s suburbs( Gurgaon, Ghaziabad, Faridabad, NOIDA and Greater NOIDA) and New Delhi combined
  • Possibly a second franchisee from Mumbai or a new franchisee from Pune.

    Cheerleaders:
    The IPL has been criticised by a few politicians and feminists for bringing in foreign cheerleaders, which is seen by many to not be in the traditional spirit of the game, as well as being against some Indian sensibilities. Two cheerleaders from London were asked to leave the ground at Mohali “because of the colour of their skin” by Wizcraft International Entertainment, which handles the team Kings XI Punjab. Ellesha Newton and Sherinne Anderson, both from London and of African ancestry were allegedly barred from entering the stadium by employees of Wizcraft International Entertainment on the pretext that “people don’t like dark girls here”. Both the girls also allege that an employee referred to them with the racial slur ″nigger″.

    Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) said a probe would be initiated by the IPL only if the two women officially complain to IPL commissioner Lalit Modi.

    BCCI and IPL officials are surprised that the two cheerleaders did not complain about the alleged racist behaviour while they were in India and spoke about it only after they returned to London.

    “We have not received any complaint from any cheerleaders that they were asked to leave by the Mohali-based Kings XI Punjab franchise recently because of the colour of their skin,” BCCI joint secretary M.P. Pandove said in Mohali.

    See also:

  • England – Twenty20 Cup
  • India – Indian Cricket League
  • Pakistan – Pakistan Super League
  • South Africa – Standard Bank Pro 20 Series
  • Sri Lanka – Inter-Provincial Twenty20
  • Australia – KFC Twenty20 Big Bash
  • New Zealand – State Twenty20
  • West Indies – Stanford 20/20
  • Zimbabwe – Metropolitan Bank Twenty20
  • Kenya – National Elite League Twenty20
  • Canada – Scotiabank National T20 Championship

  • Indian Premier League links:

  • Official site for Indian Premier League
  • Indian Premier League at Cricinfo
  • Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

    Posted in Chennai Super Kings, Delhi Daredevils, Hyderabad Deccan Chargers, Indian Premier League, Kings XI Punjab, Kolkata Knight Riders, Mumbai Indians, Rajasthan Royals, Royal Challengers Bangalore | Leave a Comment »

    Introducing…the Indian Premier League

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 30, 2008

    Photobucket

    The Indian Premier League (also known as the “DLF Indian Premier League” and often abbreviated as IPL), is a Twenty20 cricket competition created by the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and chaired by the Chairman & Commisoner IPL, BCCI Vice President Lalit Modi. The first season of the Indian Premier League commenced on 18 April 2008, and ended on 1 June 2008 with the victory of the Rajasthan Royals in the final at the DY Patil Stadium, Navi Mumbai.

    Teams play each other two times in a round robin system, with equal number of home and away matches. The top four ranking sides will progress to the semi-finals.

    The inaugural 2008 tournament started on 18 April 2008 in Bangalore and lasted for 46 days, with 59 matches scheduled, out of which 58 took place and 1 was washed out due to rain

    Television rights and sponsorship:

    The IPL will bring the BCCI income of US$1 billion, over a period of five to ten years, reinforcing its status as the richest board in world cricket.

    All of these revenues are directed to a central pool, 40% of which will go to IPL itself, 54% to franchisees and 6% as prize money. The money will be distributed in these proportions until 2017, after which the share of IPL will be 50%, franchisees 45% and prize money 5%.

    Television rights:

    On 15 January 2008 it was announced that a consortium consisting of India’s Sony Entertainment Television network and Singapore-based World Sport Group secured the global broadcasting rights of the Indian Premier League. The record deal has a duration of ten years at a cost of US $1.026 billion. As part of the deal, the consortium will pay the BCCI US $918 million for the television broadcast rights and US $108 million for the promotion of the tournament.

    20% of these proceeds would go to IPL, 8% as prize money and 72% would be distributed to the franchisees. The money would be distributed in these proportions until 2012, after which the IPL would go public and list its shares. Sony-WSG then re-sold parts of the broadcasting rights geographically to other companies.

    Rules:
    The official rules for the tournament are here. Some of the Team composition rules are:

  • Total squad strength of 16 players plus one physio and a coach.
  • No more than 8 foreign players in the squad and at most 4 in the playing XI.
  • A minimum of 4 local players must be included in each team.
  • No fewer than 4 players from the BCCI under-22 pool in each team.

    The players accorded “icon” status are: Sachin Tendulkar, Rahul Dravid, Sourav Ganguly, Yuvraj Singh and Virender Sehwag . The total spending cap for a franchisee in the first player auction was US $5m. Under-22 players are to be remunerated with a minimum annual salary of US $20,000 while for others it is US $50,000. Icon players are to be paid 15% more than the highest paid player in their respective teams.

    Franchises:
    The winning bidders for the eight franchises were announced on 24 January 2008. While the total base price for auction was US $400 million, the auction fetched US $723.59 million. The official list of franchise owners announced and the winning bids were as follows.

  • Mumbai Indians
    Owned by: Reliance Industries Limited (Mukesh Ambani)($111.9 million)
  • Royal Challengers Bangalore
    Owned by: UB group (Vijay Mallya)($111.6 million)
  • Hyderabad Deccan Chargers
    Owned by: Deccan Chronicle (T Venkatarami Reddy)($107 million)
  • Chennai Super Kings
    Owned by: India Cements (N Srinivasan)($91 million)
  • Delhi Daredevils
    Owned by: GMR Holdings (Grandhi Mallikarjuna Rao)($84 million)
  • Kings XI Punjab
    Owned by: Preity Zinta, Ness Wadia (Bombay Dyeing), Karan Paul (Apeejay Surendera Group) and Mohit Burman (Dabur)($76 million)
  • Kolkata Knight Riders
    Owned by: Red Chillies Entertainment (Shahrukh Khan, Juhi Chawla Mehta and Jai Mehta)($75.09 million)
  • Rajasthan Royals
    Owned by: Emerging Media (A.R Jha, Lachlan Murdoch, Suresh Chellaram)($67 million)

    Future Expansion:
    After the success of the first season, it has been reported that four new franchises will join the IPL in 2010-11, increasing the total number of teams to 12. The new confirmed franchises will be based in Ahmedabad and Kanpur, with Anil Ambani’s name associated with the ownership of the Ahmedabad franchise, and Sahara Group is touted as the possible suitors to buy the Kanpur franchise. Other cities being linked with getting a franchisee are Patna-Ranchi joined franchisee or a team from the North-East to promote the sport in the region and possibly one team from the north-western states of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarkhand. A second Mumbai or Delhi team has also been proposed for future expansion of two teams to take place in the 2012-13 season.

    Expansions- 2010-11 Season( 4 new teams)-

  • IPL Ahmedabad
  • IPL Kanpur
  • Any two from the following-

    1. A Patna-Ranchi joined franchisee 2. A team from the North-East 3. A team from the north-western states of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarkhand

    The unselected team from the 3 will be considered for the next set of expansions in the 2012-13 season.

    2012-13 Season( 2 new teams)-

  • The unselected 3rd team from above
  • Possibly a second franchisee from Delhi’s suburbs( Gurgaon, Ghaziabad, Faridabad, NOIDA and Greater NOIDA) and New Delhi combined
  • Possibly a second franchisee from Mumbai or a new franchisee from Pune.

    Cheerleaders:
    The IPL has been criticised by a few politicians and feminists for bringing in foreign cheerleaders, which is seen by many to not be in the traditional spirit of the game, as well as being against some Indian sensibilities. Two cheerleaders from London were asked to leave the ground at Mohali “because of the colour of their skin” by Wizcraft International Entertainment, which handles the team Kings XI Punjab. Ellesha Newton and Sherinne Anderson, both from London and of African ancestry were allegedly barred from entering the stadium by employees of Wizcraft International Entertainment on the pretext that “people don’t like dark girls here”. Both the girls also allege that an employee referred to them with the racial slur ″nigger″.

    Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) said a probe would be initiated by the IPL only if the two women officially complain to IPL commissioner Lalit Modi.

    BCCI and IPL officials are surprised that the two cheerleaders did not complain about the alleged racist behaviour while they were in India and spoke about it only after they returned to London.

    “We have not received any complaint from any cheerleaders that they were asked to leave by the Mohali-based Kings XI Punjab franchise recently because of the colour of their skin,” BCCI joint secretary M.P. Pandove said in Mohali.

    See also:

  • England – Twenty20 Cup
  • India – Indian Cricket League
  • Pakistan – Pakistan Super League
  • South Africa – Standard Bank Pro 20 Series
  • Sri Lanka – Inter-Provincial Twenty20
  • Australia – KFC Twenty20 Big Bash
  • New Zealand – State Twenty20
  • West Indies – Stanford 20/20
  • Zimbabwe – Metropolitan Bank Twenty20
  • Kenya – National Elite League Twenty20
  • Canada – Scotiabank National T20 Championship

  • Indian Premier League links:

  • Official site for Indian Premier League
  • Indian Premier League at Cricinfo
  • Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

    Posted in Chennai Super Kings, Delhi Daredevils, Hyderabad Deccan Chargers, Indian Premier League, Kings XI Punjab, Kolkata Knight Riders, Mumbai Indians, Rajasthan Royals, Royal Challengers Bangalore | Leave a Comment »

    In the International Spotlight…India Cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 9, 2008

    Photobucket

    Cricket is the unofficial national sport of India, and its development has been closely tied up with the history of the country, mirroring many of the political and cultural developments around issues such as caste, religion and nationality. Though cricket is indubitably the most popular sport in India, it is not the nation’s national sport (a distinction held by field hockey).

    Introduction to cricket by the British:
    Cricket, like field hockey, was first introduced to India by the British. The earliest recorded match was played in 1721 by British sailors on shore leave. With the expansion of British rule throughout the subcontinent, the British took the game with them wherever they went. However, the early history of the game was focused largely on the large cities, particularly Bombay (now Mumbai).

    Emergence of native players:
    Anil Kumble is the highest wicket-taker for India in both One Day International and Test matches. He is also the current Test team captainThe first Indians to play the game at a high level were the Parsi minority in Bombay. Beginning in 1892, an annual match was played between the Parsis and the Europeans. In 1907, this became a triangular tournament with the Hindus fielding a team, and in 1912 a Muslim team entered what was for twenty years the biggest tournament in India—the Bombay Quadrangular.

    Among the biggest stars in the early years of Indian cricket were the four Palwankar brothers, Shivram, Ganpat and Vithal but particularly the slow left-arm bowler, Palwankar Baloo. This was particularly noteworthy as the Palwankars were from one of the untouchable castes. Treated as equals on the cricket field, off-field they often faced discrimination. This changed slowly; however, Palwankar Vithal did eventually captain the Hindu team in the quadrangular.

    The formation of the Board of Control for Cricket in India in 1929 led to a first Test match with England three years later. In 1935, the Ranji Trophy began; it continues to the present as the leading regional tournament in India, with each state fielding a team. The trophy was a deliberate attempt to avoid the communalism of the quadrangular tournament.

    Post-Freedom Developments:
    The Indian cricket team has won one Cricket World Cup, in 1983. India also reached the final in 2003, but lost to Australia. Team India bagged the 2007 Twenty-20 Cricket World Cup under the captainship of M.S.Dhoni. In recent years, Indian cricket has been marked by the intense rivalry with Pakistan. Furthermore, there were several scandals related to match fixing and gambling, not restricted to just India, but plaguing several different teams.

    International Cricket:
    International cricket in India generally does not follow a fixed pattern like, for example, the English schedule under which the nation tours other countries during winter and plays at home during the summer. Generally, there has recently been a tendency to play more one-day matches than Test matches. The Indian cricket side has recently played a test series in Australia.

    Domestic Competitions:

  • Ranji Trophy – Founded as ‘The Cricket Championship of India’ at a meeting of the Board of Control for Cricket in India in July 1934. The first Ranji Trophy fixtures took place in the 1934-35 season. Syed Mohammed Hadi of Hyderabad was the first batsman to score a century in the tournament. The Trophy was donated by H.H. Sir Bhupendra Singh Mahinder Baha-dur, Maharajah of Patiala in memory of His late Highness Sir Ranjitsinhji Vibhaji of Nawanagar. In the main, the Ranji Trophy is composed of teams representing the states that make up India. As the political states have multiplied, so have cricket teams, but not every state has a team. Some states have more than one cricket team, e.g. Maharashtra and Gujarat. There are also ‘odd’ teams like Railways, and Services representing the armed forces. The various teams used to be grouped into zones – North, West, East, Central and South – and the initial matches were played on a league basis within the zones. The top two (until 1991-92) and then top three teams (subsequent years) from each zone then played in a national knock-out competition. Starting with the 2002-03 season, the zonal system has been abandoned and a two-division structure has been adopted with two teams being promoted from the plate league and two relegated from the elite league. If the knockout matches are not finished they are decided on the first-innings lead.
  • Irani Trophy – The Irani Trophy tournament was conceived during the 1959-60 season to mark the completion of 25 years of the Ranji Trophy championship and was named after the late Z.R. Irani, who was associated with the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) from its inception in 1928, till his death in 1970 and a keen patron of the game. The first match, played between the Ranji Trophy champions and the Rest of India was played in 1959-60. For the first few years, it was played at the fag end of the season. Realising the importance of the fixture, the BCCI moved it to the beginning of the season. Since 1965-66, it has traditionally heralded the start of the new domestic season. The Irani Trophy game ranks very high in popularity and importance. It is one of the few domestic matches that is followed with keen interest by cricket lovers in the country. Leading players take part in the game which has often been a sort of selection trial to pick the Indian team for foreign tours.
  • Duleep Trophy – The Duleep Trophy competition was started by the Board of Control for Cricket in India in 1961-62 with the aim of providing a greater competitive edge in domestic cricket – because, apart from the knock-out stages of the Ranji Trophy, that competition proved predictable, with Bombay winning for fifteen consecutive years. The Duleep was also meant to help the selectors in assessing form. The original format was that five teams, drawn from the five zones, play each other on a knock-out basis. From the 1993-94 season, the competition has been converted to a league format.
  • Deodhar Trophy- Started in 1973-74 by Board of Control for Cricket in India, it is the current one-day cricket competition in Indian domestic cricket. 5 zonal teams – North zone, South zone, East zone, West zone and Central zone feature in the competition. North zone have won this competition 11th time.
  • Challenger series- Started as the Challenger series by the Board of Control for Cricket in India in 1994-95 and later named as NKP Salve Challenger Trophy in 1998-99, the tournament features 3 teams: India senior, India A and India B playing each other. The tournament features the top 36 players from India
  • Indian Cricket League- Appalled by the state of domestic Indian cricket, Zee TV decided to launch this league as its own Twenty20 domestic series. The first matches were held in October 2007. The ICL sprung into the spotlight due to its head on battle with the Board of Control for Cricket in India. Brian Lara was the first international star to be officially drafted to play in the league.
  • Indian Premier League
    In response to the rival ICL, the BCCI started the Indian Premier League. This League being launched by BCCI have received support from all the other Cricket Boards, and International Players could be drafted into City-based Franchises.

    See also…

  • The Official Site of the Indian Cricket League – Indian Cricket League – Copyright © PayAutoMata, LLC
  • Cricket247.in – Live ICL scorecard and news
  • Indian Cricket League – ICL|Latest ICL News |ICL Forums | ICL Info| ICL Match Schedule|
  • Crichome – News, discussions about League Cricket, Indian Cricket League, Indian Premier League
  • Breaking Cricket Stories – Discover, Score, Discuss | Runoutt
  • Indian Cricket League
  • Indian Cricket
  • ICL 20/20 Cricket Championship– Zee Sports broadcasts live ICL 20/20 matches

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.com, Owners of Pictures, Cricinfo.com, and other related sites/links etc

  • Posted in B.C.C.I, Bombay, Challenger Series, Deodhar Trophy, Duleep Trophy, Indian Cricket League, Indian Premier League, Irani Trophy, Mumbai, NKP Salve Challenger Trophy, Ranji Trophy, Zee TV | Leave a Comment »

    In the International Spotlight…India Cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 8, 2008

    Photobucket

    Cricket is the unofficial national sport of India, and its development has been closely tied up with the history of the country, mirroring many of the political and cultural developments around issues such as caste, religion and nationality. Though cricket is indubitably the most popular sport in India, it is not the nation’s national sport (a distinction held by field hockey).

    Introduction to cricket by the British:
    Cricket, like field hockey, was first introduced to India by the British. The earliest recorded match was played in 1721 by British sailors on shore leave. With the expansion of British rule throughout the subcontinent, the British took the game with them wherever they went. However, the early history of the game was focused largely on the large cities, particularly Bombay (now Mumbai).

    Emergence of native players:
    Anil Kumble is the highest wicket-taker for India in both One Day International and Test matches. He is also the current Test team captainThe first Indians to play the game at a high level were the Parsi minority in Bombay. Beginning in 1892, an annual match was played between the Parsis and the Europeans. In 1907, this became a triangular tournament with the Hindus fielding a team, and in 1912 a Muslim team entered what was for twenty years the biggest tournament in India—the Bombay Quadrangular.

    Among the biggest stars in the early years of Indian cricket were the four Palwankar brothers, Shivram, Ganpat and Vithal but particularly the slow left-arm bowler, Palwankar Baloo. This was particularly noteworthy as the Palwankars were from one of the untouchable castes. Treated as equals on the cricket field, off-field they often faced discrimination. This changed slowly; however, Palwankar Vithal did eventually captain the Hindu team in the quadrangular.

    The formation of the Board of Control for Cricket in India in 1929 led to a first Test match with England three years later. In 1935, the Ranji Trophy began; it continues to the present as the leading regional tournament in India, with each state fielding a team. The trophy was a deliberate attempt to avoid the communalism of the quadrangular tournament.

    Post-Freedom Developments:
    The Indian cricket team has won one Cricket World Cup, in 1983. India also reached the final in 2003, but lost to Australia. Team India bagged the 2007 Twenty-20 Cricket World Cup under the captainship of M.S.Dhoni. In recent years, Indian cricket has been marked by the intense rivalry with Pakistan. Furthermore, there were several scandals related to match fixing and gambling, not restricted to just India, but plaguing several different teams.

    International Cricket:
    International cricket in India generally does not follow a fixed pattern like, for example, the English schedule under which the nation tours other countries during winter and plays at home during the summer. Generally, there has recently been a tendency to play more one-day matches than Test matches. The Indian cricket side has recently played a test series in Australia.

    Domestic Competitions:

  • Ranji Trophy – Founded as ‘The Cricket Championship of India’ at a meeting of the Board of Control for Cricket in India in July 1934. The first Ranji Trophy fixtures took place in the 1934-35 season. Syed Mohammed Hadi of Hyderabad was the first batsman to score a century in the tournament. The Trophy was donated by H.H. Sir Bhupendra Singh Mahinder Baha-dur, Maharajah of Patiala in memory of His late Highness Sir Ranjitsinhji Vibhaji of Nawanagar. In the main, the Ranji Trophy is composed of teams representing the states that make up India. As the political states have multiplied, so have cricket teams, but not every state has a team. Some states have more than one cricket team, e.g. Maharashtra and Gujarat. There are also ‘odd’ teams like Railways, and Services representing the armed forces. The various teams used to be grouped into zones – North, West, East, Central and South – and the initial matches were played on a league basis within the zones. The top two (until 1991-92) and then top three teams (subsequent years) from each zone then played in a national knock-out competition. Starting with the 2002-03 season, the zonal system has been abandoned and a two-division structure has been adopted with two teams being promoted from the plate league and two relegated from the elite league. If the knockout matches are not finished they are decided on the first-innings lead.
  • Irani Trophy – The Irani Trophy tournament was conceived during the 1959-60 season to mark the completion of 25 years of the Ranji Trophy championship and was named after the late Z.R. Irani, who was associated with the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) from its inception in 1928, till his death in 1970 and a keen patron of the game. The first match, played between the Ranji Trophy champions and the Rest of India was played in 1959-60. For the first few years, it was played at the fag end of the season. Realising the importance of the fixture, the BCCI moved it to the beginning of the season. Since 1965-66, it has traditionally heralded the start of the new domestic season. The Irani Trophy game ranks very high in popularity and importance. It is one of the few domestic matches that is followed with keen interest by cricket lovers in the country. Leading players take part in the game which has often been a sort of selection trial to pick the Indian team for foreign tours.
  • Duleep Trophy – The Duleep Trophy competition was started by the Board of Control for Cricket in India in 1961-62 with the aim of providing a greater competitive edge in domestic cricket – because, apart from the knock-out stages of the Ranji Trophy, that competition proved predictable, with Bombay winning for fifteen consecutive years. The Duleep was also meant to help the selectors in assessing form. The original format was that five teams, drawn from the five zones, play each other on a knock-out basis. From the 1993-94 season, the competition has been converted to a league format.
  • Deodhar Trophy- Started in 1973-74 by Board of Control for Cricket in India, it is the current one-day cricket competition in Indian domestic cricket. 5 zonal teams – North zone, South zone, East zone, West zone and Central zone feature in the competition. North zone have won this competition 11th time.
  • Challenger series- Started as the Challenger series by the Board of Control for Cricket in India in 1994-95 and later named as NKP Salve Challenger Trophy in 1998-99, the tournament features 3 teams: India senior, India A and India B playing each other. The tournament features the top 36 players from India
  • Indian Cricket League- Appalled by the state of domestic Indian cricket, Zee TV decided to launch this league as its own Twenty20 domestic series. The first matches were held in October 2007. The ICL sprung into the spotlight due to its head on battle with the Board of Control for Cricket in India. Brian Lara was the first international star to be officially drafted to play in the league.
  • Indian Premier League
    In response to the rival ICL, the BCCI started the Indian Premier League. This League being launched by BCCI have received support from all the other Cricket Boards, and International Players could be drafted into City-based Franchises.

    See also…

  • The Official Site of the Indian Cricket League – Indian Cricket League – Copyright © PayAutoMata, LLC
  • Cricket247.in – Live ICL scorecard and news
  • Indian Cricket League – ICL|Latest ICL News |ICL Forums | ICL Info| ICL Match Schedule|
  • Crichome – News, discussions about League Cricket, Indian Cricket League, Indian Premier League
  • Breaking Cricket Stories – Discover, Score, Discuss | Runoutt
  • Indian Cricket League
  • Indian Cricket*
  • ICL 20/20 Cricket Championship– Zee Sports broadcasts live ICL 20/20 matches
  • Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.com, Owners of Pictures, Cricinfo.com, and other related sites/links etc

    Posted in B.C.C.I, Bombay, Challenger Series, Deodhar Trophy, Duleep Trophy, Indian Cricket League, Indian Premier League, Irani Trophy, Mumbai, NKP Salve Challenger Trophy, Ranji Trophy, Zee TV | Leave a Comment »

    Adam Gilchrist goes Nuts!

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on April 29, 2008

    A few days ago I was frightened, because Adam Gilchrist went nuts…No he wasn’t admitted to a mental institute but he went nuts in the Indian Premier League the other day by blasting 109 not out off 47 balls which included an impressive 10 sixes and 9 fours. It was his scintilliating performance that enabled the Deccan Chargers to take charge of their match against the Mumbai Indians in style by beating them by 10 wickets. It was an excellent display of power hitting by Gilchrist, who is known for his brilliant attacking acts with the bat, and I’m sure that him and the Kolkata wicket keeper and New Zealand International, Brendon McCullum, will be challenging eachother for the rights as the most explosive batsman in the Indian Premier League. McCullum is currently the 2nd highest run scorer in the league so far and even though Gilchrist is a few places behind him I’m sure that with more punishing displays like that he will definetly provide a challenge. To the Deccan Chargers: Congratulations for the win! Enjoy the spoils of that huge win and let that build your confidence up for your remaining time in the tournament, to the Mumbai Indians: Bad Luck this time, lets see you assess what went wrong and hope for some success for you in your remaining time. I have noticed that Twenty20 games can be unpredictable and it can take only one mistake to turn a whole game around, I think its that which will keep us on the edge of our seats for the remainder of the tournament.

    Right click HERE to view the the story behind Adam Gilchrist’s brutal innings.

    Posted in Adam Gilchrist, Batting, Deccan Chargers, Explosive, Indian Premier League, Mumbai Indians, sixes, twenty20, Wicket-keeper | 3 Comments »

    Adam Gilchrist goes Nuts!

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on April 28, 2008

    A few days ago I was frightened, because Adam Gilchrist went nuts…No he wasn’t admitted to a mental institute but he went nuts in the Indian Premier League the other day by blasting 109 not out off 47 balls which included an impressive 10 sixes and 9 fours. It was his scintilliating performance that enabled the Deccan Chargers to take charge of their match against the Mumbai Indians in style by beating them by 10 wickets. It was an excellent display of power hitting by Gilchrist, who is known for his brilliant attacking acts with the bat, and I’m sure that him and the Kolkata wicket keeper and New Zealand International, Brendon McCullum, will be challenging eachother for the rights as the most explosive batsman in the Indian Premier League. McCullum is currently the 2nd highest run scorer in the league so far and even though Gilchrist is a few places behind him I’m sure that with more punishing displays like that he will definetly provide a challenge. To the Deccan Chargers: Congratulations for the win! Enjoy the spoils of that huge win and let that build your confidence up for your remaining time in the tournament, to the Mumbai Indians: Bad Luck this time, lets see you assess what went wrong and hope for some success for you in your remaining time. I have noticed that Twenty20 games can be unpredictable and it can take only one mistake to turn a whole game around, I think its that which will keep us on the edge of our seats for the remainder of the tournament.

    Right click HERE to view the the story behind Adam Gilchrist’s brutal innings.

    Posted in Adam Gilchrist, Batting, Deccan Chargers, Explosive, Indian Premier League, Mumbai Indians, sixes, twenty20, Wicket-keeper | 3 Comments »

    Player Profile(#20)…Shane Warne(Australia)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on April 27, 2008

    Photobucket

    Photobucket

    Shane Keith Warne (born 13 September 1969) is a former Australian international cricketer who is widely regarded as one of the finest leg spin bowlers in the history of cricket. While his career statistics suggest that, despite his aggregate performances, phenomenal popularity and notoriety, he was perhaps less effective and destructive than the interbellum Australian leg-spinners Bill O’Reilly and Clarrie Grimmett, his durability and impact on the modern game assure his place alongside them in cricket’s pantheon. Indeed, in 2000, he was selected by a panel of cricket experts as one of the five Wisden Cricketers of the Century, the only bowler selected in the quintet.

    Warne played his first Test match in 1992, and his 708 wickets was the record for the most wickets taken by any bowler in Test cricket, until it was broken by Sri Lanka’s Muttiah Muralitharan on December 3, 2007. He took over 1000 international wickets (in Tests and One-Day Internationals)—he was the second bowler to reach this milestone after Muttiah Muralitharan. A useful lower-order batsman, Warne also scored over 3000 Test runs, and he holds the record for most Test runs without a century. His career was plagued by scandals off the field; these included a ban from cricket for testing positive for a prohibited substance, and charges of bringing the game into disrepute.

    As well as Australia, he also played Australian domestic cricket for his home state of Victoria, and English domestic cricket for Hampshire. He was captain of Hampshire for three seasons, from 2005 to 2007. In March 2008, Warne signed to play in the Indian Premier League for the Jaipur team, Rajasthan Royals in the first edition of the tournament, where he will play the roles of both captain and coach.

    He retired from international cricket in January 2007, at the end of Australia’s 5-0 Ashes series victory over England. Two other players integral to the Australian team of recent years, Glenn McGrath and Justin Langer, also retired from Tests on the same day which led some, including the Australian captain, Ricky Ponting, to declare it the “end of an era”.

    Following his retirement from international cricket, Warne played a full season at Hampshire in 2007. He had been scheduled to appear in the 2008 English cricket season, but in late March 2008 he announced his retirement from playing first-class cricket in order to be able to spend more time pursuing interests outside of cricket.

  • Cricket-Online player profile – Shane Warne
  • Player Profile: Shane Warne from Cricinfo
  • Cricket Australia media release congratulating Warne on 500th wicket
  • 10 photos of milestone wickets in Warne’s career
  • VB Warnie – Summer of Spin
  • Ball of the Century
  • List of cricket incidents
  • List of sportspeople sanctioned for doping offences
  • Statsguru – Shane K Warne – Test Bowling – List of wickets

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to owners of pictures used, Wikipedia.org, Cricinfo.com

  • Posted in 700 Wickets, Australia, Baggy Green, Hampshire, Indian Premier League, Jaipur, Leg spin, Living Legend of cricket, Rajasthan Royals, Shane Warne, Victoria | Leave a Comment »