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The Complete List of Test and O.D.I Cricketers

Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 12, 2008

Here is a list of links that take you to a page showing every cricketer that has played test cricket for their country. This might help with cricket related trivia so be sure to bookmark this site :).

Test Cricket:

  • New Zealand Test Cricketers
  • List of Australian Test Cricketers
  • List of England Test Cricketers
  • List of West Indies Test Cricketers
  • List of Pakistan Test Cricketers
  • List of South Africa Test Cricketers
  • List of India Test Cricketers
  • List of Sri Lanka Test Cricricketers
  • List of Bangladesh Test Cricketers
  • List of Zimbabwe Test Cricketers

    O.D.I Cricket:
  • List of Australia ODI Cricketers
  • List of Bangladesh ODI Cricketers
  • List of Bermuda ODI Cricketers
  • List of Canada ODI Cricketers
  • List of England ODI Cricketers
  • List of Hong Kong ODI Cricketers
  • List of India ODI Cricketers
  • List of Ireland ODI Cricketers
  • List of Kenya ODI Cricketers
  • List of Namibia ODI Cricketers
  • List of Netherlands ODI Cricketers
  • List of New Zealand ODI Cricketers
  • List of Pakistan ODI Cricketers
  • List of Scotland ODI Cricketers
  • List of South Africa ODI Cricketers
  • List of Sri Lanka ODI Cricketers
  • List of U.A.E ODI Cricketers
  • List of U.S.A ODI Cricketers
  • List of West Indies ODI Cricketers
  • List of Zimbabwe ODI Cricketers

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

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    Posted in Australia, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Canada, England, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Kenya, Namibia, Netherlands, new zealand, ODI, Pakistan, scotland, South Africa, Sri Lanka, USA, West Indies, Zimbabwe | Leave a Comment »

    The Complete List of Test and O.D.I Cricketers

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 12, 2008

    Here is a list of links that take you to a page showing every cricketer that has played test cricket for their country. This might help with cricket related trivia so be sure to bookmark this site :).

    Test Cricket:

  • New Zealand Test Cricketers
  • List of Australian Test Cricketers
  • List of England Test Cricketers
  • List of West Indies Test Cricketers
  • List of Pakistan Test Cricketers
  • List of South Africa Test Cricketers
  • List of India Test Cricketers
  • List of Sri Lanka Test Cricricketers
  • List of Bangladesh Test Cricketers
  • List of Zimbabwe Test Cricketers

    O.D.I Cricket:
  • List of Australia ODI Cricketers
  • List of Bangladesh ODI Cricketers
  • List of Bermuda ODI Cricketers
  • List of Canada ODI Cricketers
  • List of England ODI Cricketers
  • List of Hong Kong ODI Cricketers
  • List of India ODI Cricketers
  • List of Ireland ODI Cricketers
  • List of Kenya ODI Cricketers
  • List of Namibia ODI Cricketers
  • List of Netherlands ODI Cricketers
  • List of New Zealand ODI Cricketers
  • List of Pakistan ODI Cricketers
  • List of Scotland ODI Cricketers
  • List of South Africa ODI Cricketers
  • List of Sri Lanka ODI Cricketers
  • List of U.A.E ODI Cricketers
  • List of U.S.A ODI Cricketers
  • List of West Indies ODI Cricketers
  • List of Zimbabwe ODI Cricketers

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Australia, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Canada, England, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Kenya, Namibia, Netherlands, new zealand, ODI, Pakistan, scotland, South Africa, Sri Lanka, USA, West Indies, Zimbabwe | Leave a Comment »

    Introducing… the Twenty20 Champions League

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 5, 2008

    Photobucket

    The Twenty20 Champions League is an international Twenty20 cricket competition between clubs from Australia, England, India, Pakistan and South Africa. The Twenty20 Champions League is chaired by Lalit Modi, who is the Chairman and Commissioner of the Indian Premier League and Vice-President of the BCCI. The competition is being launched in 2008 as a response to the success of national Twenty20 domestic cricket leagues, most notably the Indian Premier League. The first edition was set to take place from late September to early October 2008 in India, after the tournament organisers resolved various teething problems that had put the inaugural tournament under some doubt, but it was later announced that the tournament would be held from December 3 to December 10, 2008. The initial tournament was postponed again following terrorist attacks in Mumbai in November 2008. A rearranged date has not been announced.

    Background:
    Chennai vs Kolkata in the Indian Premier League. Chennai have qualified for the first edition of the T20 Champions League

    An international tournament for domestic cricket teams is believed to have been first mooted by Lalit Modi, vice-president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) in 1996, Lalit Modi is also the chairman and commissioner on the IPL. The launch and subsequent success of Twenty20 cricket some years later was the influence behind a serious effort to get such a tournament off the ground. Twenty20 cricket was launched by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) in 2003. Its launch was a result of a long-term decline in the popularity of county championship and domestic limited-overs cricket. By reducing the number of overs per innings to twenty and by placing a three hour limit on matches, the format was designed to attract a younger crowd and to boost attendances. Twenty20 proved a success, with an international version launched in 2005 and a World Twenty20 Competition held in September 2007. This proved much more popular than the 50 over Cricket World Cup had been just five months previously. The following year, the Indian Premier League (IPL) was launched, proving that there could be a market for a big-spending domestic Twenty20 cricket league. The success of Twenty20 and the IPL lead many commentators to suggest that other forms of cricket would suffer, with some worrying about the effect of the popular fast-paced ‘slogging’ game on players’ abilities in Test cricket.

    Immediately after the end of the first series of the IPL, the cricket authorities in England, India, Australia and South Africa entered into discussions to create a new international club competition, to capitalize on the this success. The new tournament’s £2.5m winning prize was described as “unprecedented” in cricket. A number of different formats for the tournament were considered, with original proposals containing a much lower prize fund. The T20 Champions League’s creation was announced on 7 June 2008, along with the announcement of planned restructuring of some of the domestic cricket tournaments involved, including the introduction of franchising in South Africa, England and Australia. Pakistan’s participation was always mooted, but not confirmed when the tournament was first launched. Following a series of discussions and the announcement of the creation of a Pakistan Super League from 2009, it was confirmed that two Pakistani teams would compete.

    Format:
    Qualifying:
    Although the 2008 tournament was originally rumoured to only include teams from Australia, South Africa, India and England, it was announced on 4 July 2008, that two teams from Pakistan’s domestic tournament were also invited. At the same, time England’s participation was also put into doubt, following differences between the ECB & BCCI over the inclusion of rebel Indian Cricket League (ICL) players. Eventually, it was arranged so that the 2008 Twenty20 Champions League is to be contested between 8 teams from 5 countries. The qualifiers are:

  • The winners and runners-up of the KFC Twenty20 Big Bash in Australia.
  • The winners and runners-up of the Standard Bank Pro 20 Series in South Africa and Zimbabwe.
  • The winners of the Twenty20 Cup in England and Wales. (Note: Runners-up Kent were not invited to participate in the inaugural tournament because it contained two players who have taken part in the rebel Indian Cricket League, a competition that is not recognized by the BCCI).
  • The winners and runners-up of the Indian Premier League in India.
  • The winners of the RBS Twenty-20 Cup from Pakistan, (Sialkot Stallions in 2007-08).

    This format is expected to change as 12 teams will compete in the 2nd edition of the tournament in September-October 2009.

    England’s Participation:
    The organisers of the tournament confirmed that any team competing would be banned from fielding players who have competed in the Indian Cricket League, a rival to the Indian Premier League. As a result of this, England’s participation in the tournament was put in jeopardy. For the the 2008 season, 15 of the 18 counties fielded 25 players from the ICL. On 24 July 2008, IPL commissioner Lalit Modi confirmed their stance by stating that only Middlesex and Essex stood a chance of being invited to the Champions League because they didn’t have ICL links. Middlesex won the Twenty20 Cup and confirmed they had accepted the invitation to participate in the tournament. Kent were officially barred from the competition on 1 August, and the ECB’s suggestion to replace them with Essex was rejected by Cricket Australia.

    Tournament:
    The Twenty20 Champions League will be played over an eight day period and will consist of two divisions competing in a round-robin format. The top two teams from each division will then move on to an elimination round to the finals.

    Links to more information on the Twenty20 Champions League:

  • Cricket Champions League unveiled
  • Everything you wanted to know about the Champions League
  • Champions League Twenty20 Moved To December

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Australia, B.C.C.I, ECB, England, India, Lalit Modi, Pakistan, South Africa, Twenty20 Champions League | Leave a Comment »

    Introducing… the Twenty20 Champions League

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 5, 2008

    Photobucket

    The Twenty20 Champions League is an international Twenty20 cricket competition between clubs from Australia, England, India, Pakistan and South Africa. The Twenty20 Champions League is chaired by Lalit Modi, who is the Chairman and Commissioner of the Indian Premier League and Vice-President of the BCCI. The competition is being launched in 2008 as a response to the success of national Twenty20 domestic cricket leagues, most notably the Indian Premier League. The first edition was set to take place from late September to early October 2008 in India, after the tournament organisers resolved various teething problems that had put the inaugural tournament under some doubt, but it was later announced that the tournament would be held from December 3 to December 10, 2008. The initial tournament was postponed again following terrorist attacks in Mumbai in November 2008. A rearranged date has not been announced.

    Background:
    Chennai vs Kolkata in the Indian Premier League. Chennai have qualified for the first edition of the T20 Champions League

    An international tournament for domestic cricket teams is believed to have been first mooted by Lalit Modi, vice-president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) in 1996, Lalit Modi is also the chairman and commissioner on the IPL. The launch and subsequent success of Twenty20 cricket some years later was the influence behind a serious effort to get such a tournament off the ground. Twenty20 cricket was launched by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) in 2003. Its launch was a result of a long-term decline in the popularity of county championship and domestic limited-overs cricket. By reducing the number of overs per innings to twenty and by placing a three hour limit on matches, the format was designed to attract a younger crowd and to boost attendances. Twenty20 proved a success, with an international version launched in 2005 and a World Twenty20 Competition held in September 2007. This proved much more popular than the 50 over Cricket World Cup had been just five months previously. The following year, the Indian Premier League (IPL) was launched, proving that there could be a market for a big-spending domestic Twenty20 cricket league. The success of Twenty20 and the IPL lead many commentators to suggest that other forms of cricket would suffer, with some worrying about the effect of the popular fast-paced ‘slogging’ game on players’ abilities in Test cricket.

    Immediately after the end of the first series of the IPL, the cricket authorities in England, India, Australia and South Africa entered into discussions to create a new international club competition, to capitalize on the this success. The new tournament’s £2.5m winning prize was described as “unprecedented” in cricket. A number of different formats for the tournament were considered, with original proposals containing a much lower prize fund. The T20 Champions League’s creation was announced on 7 June 2008, along with the announcement of planned restructuring of some of the domestic cricket tournaments involved, including the introduction of franchising in South Africa, England and Australia. Pakistan’s participation was always mooted, but not confirmed when the tournament was first launched. Following a series of discussions and the announcement of the creation of a Pakistan Super League from 2009, it was confirmed that two Pakistani teams would compete.

    Format:
    Qualifying:
    Although the 2008 tournament was originally rumoured to only include teams from Australia, South Africa, India and England, it was announced on 4 July 2008, that two teams from Pakistan’s domestic tournament were also invited. At the same, time England’s participation was also put into doubt, following differences between the ECB & BCCI over the inclusion of rebel Indian Cricket League (ICL) players. Eventually, it was arranged so that the 2008 Twenty20 Champions League is to be contested between 8 teams from 5 countries. The qualifiers are:

  • The winners and runners-up of the KFC Twenty20 Big Bash in Australia.
  • The winners and runners-up of the Standard Bank Pro 20 Series in South Africa and Zimbabwe.
  • The winners of the Twenty20 Cup in England and Wales. (Note: Runners-up Kent were not invited to participate in the inaugural tournament because it contained two players who have taken part in the rebel Indian Cricket League, a competition that is not recognized by the BCCI).
  • The winners and runners-up of the Indian Premier League in India.
  • The winners of the RBS Twenty-20 Cup from Pakistan, (Sialkot Stallions in 2007-08).

    This format is expected to change as 12 teams will compete in the 2nd edition of the tournament in September-October 2009.

    England’s Participation:
    The organisers of the tournament confirmed that any team competing would be banned from fielding players who have competed in the Indian Cricket League, a rival to the Indian Premier League. As a result of this, England’s participation in the tournament was put in jeopardy. For the the 2008 season, 15 of the 18 counties fielded 25 players from the ICL. On 24 July 2008, IPL commissioner Lalit Modi confirmed their stance by stating that only Middlesex and Essex stood a chance of being invited to the Champions League because they didn’t have ICL links. Middlesex won the Twenty20 Cup and confirmed they had accepted the invitation to participate in the tournament. Kent were officially barred from the competition on 1 August, and the ECB’s suggestion to replace them with Essex was rejected by Cricket Australia.

    Tournament:
    The Twenty20 Champions League will be played over an eight day period and will consist of two divisions competing in a round-robin format. The top two teams from each division will then move on to an elimination round to the finals.

    Links to more information on the Twenty20 Champions League:

  • Cricket Champions League unveiled
  • Everything you wanted to know about the Champions League
  • Champions League Twenty20 Moved To December

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Australia, B.C.C.I, ECB, England, India, Lalit Modi, Pakistan, South Africa, Twenty20 Champions League | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#36)… Mahendra Singh Dhoni (India)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 3, 2008

    Photobucket

    Mahendra Singh Dhoni or MS Dhoni pronunciation (Hindi: महेन्द्र सिंह धोनी) (born July 7, 1981 in Lavali Village Almora, Uttarakhand) is an Indian cricketer and the current captain of the Indian team. Initially recognized as an extravagantly flamboyant and destructive batsman, Dhoni has come to be regarded as one of the coolest heads to captain the Indian ODI side. Under his captaincy, India won the 2007 ICC World Twenty20, CB Series of 2007-08 and IDEA Cup India-Sri Lanka ODI Series of 2008, the first ever bilateral ODI series win of India in Sri Lanka and The Border-Gavaskar trophy 2008 in which they beat Australia 2-0 thus letting India regain its spot at No.2 in world test rankings(fallen to No.3 after Sri lanka tour). Dhoni also recently captained the ODI team that beat England in the series 5-0.Dhoni is currently ranked the best ODI batsman in the world by the ICC. Mahendra Singh Dhoni was awarded the ODI Player of the Year award in 2008, the first Indian player to achieve this feat.

    Personal life:
    Mahendra Singh Dhoni was born in Ranchi Jharkhand to Pan Singh and Devaki Dev. His paternal village Lvali is in the Lamgarha block of the Almora District of Uttarakhand. Dhoni’s parents, moved from Uttarakhand to Ranchi where Pan Singh worked in junior management positions in MECON. Dhoni has a sister Jayanti and a brother Narendra. Dhoni had long hair which he has now shortened; he cut it because he wanted to look like his favourite film star John Abraham. Dhoni is a fan of Adam Gilchrist, and his childhood idols were cricket teammate Sachin Tendulkar, Bollywood actor Amitabh Bachchan and singer Lata Mangeshkar.

    Dhoni studied at DAV Jawahar Vidya Mandir, Shyamali, Ranchi,Jharkahnd where he initially excelled in badminton and football and was selected at district and club level in these sports. Dhoni was a goalkeeper for his football team and was sent to play cricket for a local cricket club by his football coach. Though he had not played cricket, Dhoni impressed with his wicket-keeping skills and became the regular wicketkeeper at the Commando cricket club (1995 – 1998). Based on his performance at club cricket, he was picked for the 1997/98 season Vinoo Mankad Trophy Under-16 Championship and he performed well. Dhoni focused on cricket after his 10th standard.


    Playing Style:

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    Dhoni is an aggressive right-handed batsman and wicket-keeper. Dhoni is one of a number of wicket-keepers who have come through the ranks of junior and India A cricket teams to represent the national team — Parthiv Patel, Ajay Ratra and Dinesh Karthik also followed this route. Dhoni, referred to as ‘Mahi’ by his friends, debuted in the Bihar cricket team during the 1998/99 cricket season and was selected to represent India-A for a tour to Kenya in 2004. Along with Gautam Gambhir, Dhoni made multiple centuries against the Pakistan-A team in a tri-nation series and was selected in the Indian national team later in that year.[citation needed]

    Dhoni tends to play mostly from the back foot with a pronounced bottom hand grip.He has a very fast hand speed through the ball which often results in the ball racing across the ground.From this initial stance his feets do not show much movement which sometimes results in chasing balls while not coming to the pitch of the ball or inside edging a lot of balls.

    Dhoni scored 148 against Pakistan in his fifth ODI match in 2005 — then the highest score by an Indian wicketkeeper. Later in the year, he broke his own record as well as set the current world record for the highest score in the second innings in ODI matches as he scored 183* against Sri Lanka. Dhoni’s success in the limited overs format secured him a place in the test team. Consistent performances in ODI cricket through the end of the 2005/06 season saw Dhoni briefly ranked as the No. 1 batsman in the ICC ODI ratings.[citation needed]

    Dhoni’s form dipped through 2006 as India lost matches at the ICC Champions trophy, DLF Cup, away bilateral series against West Indies and South Africa. A return to form in the home series against West Indies and SriLanka in early 2007 proved to be an inaccurate indicator of Dhoni’s form as India crashed out of the first round in the 2007 Cricket World Cup. Dhoni was out for a duck in both India’s losses. After the World Cup, Dhoni won the Man of the series award in the bilateral ODI tournament against Bangladesh. For the tour of England, Dhoni was named the ODI team vice-captain.

    As a batsman, Dhoni has shown the maturity to restrain his aggressive nature and play a responsible innings when the situation requires. Apart from traditional shots, Dhoni has two very unorthodox but effective cricket strokes. Since his entry into the Indian cricket team, Dhoni’s aggressive batting style, success on the field, personality, and long hair have made him one of the most marketable cricketers in India.

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    Domestic career:

    Junior cricket:
    Dhoni was included in the Bihar U-19 squad for the 1998/99 season and scored 176 runs in 5 matches (7 innings) as the team finished fourth in the group of six and did not make it to the quarter finals. Dhoni was not picked for the East Zone U-19 squad (CK Nayudu Trophy) and Rest of India squad (MA Chidambaram Trophy and Vinoo Mankad Trophy). Bihar U-19 cricket team advanced to the finals of the 1999-2000 Cooch Behar Trophy where Dhoni made 84 to help Bihar post a total of 357. Bihar’s efforts were dwarfed by Punjab U-19’s 839 with Dhoni’s future national squad teammate Yuvraj Singh making 358. Dhoni’s contribution for the tournament included 488 runs (9 matches, 12 innings), 5 fifties, 17 catches and 7 stumpings. MS Dhoni made it to the East Zone U-19 squad for the CK Nayudu trophy but scored only 97 runs in four matches as East Zone lost all four matches and finished last in the tournament.

    Bihar team:
    Dhoni made his Ranji Trophy debut for Bihar in the 1999-2000 season as an eighteen year old. He made a half century in his debut match scoring 68* in the second innings against Assam cricket team. Dhoni finished the season with 283 runs in 5 matches. Dhoni scored his maiden first-class century against Bengal in the 2000/01 season in a losing cause. Apart from the century, his performance in the 2000/01[14] did not include another score over fifty and in 2001/02 season he scored just five fifty in each season in four Ranji matches. Dhoni’s performance for the 2002/03 season in the Ranji Trophy included three half centuries in the Ranji Trophy and a couple of half-centuries in the Deodhar Trophy competition as he started winning recognition for his lower-order run contribution as well as hard hitting batting style.

    In the 2003/04 season, Dhoni scored a century (128*) against Assam in the first match of the Ranji ODI trophy. He was part of the East Zone squad that won the Deodhar Trophy for the year and contributed with 244 runs in 4 matches. In the Duleep Trophy finals, Dhoni was picked over International cricketer Deep Dasgupta to represent East zone. He scored a fighting half century in the second innings in a losing cause.

    India A team:
    He was recognized for his efforts in the 2003/04 season, especially in the ODI format and was picked for the India A squad for a tour of Zimbabwe and Kenya. Against the Zimbabwe XI in Harare Sports Club, Dhoni had his best wicket-keeping effort with 7 catches and 4 stumpings in the match. In the tri-nation tournament involving Kenya, India ‘A’ and Pakistan ‘A’, Dhoni helped India ‘A’ chase their target of 223 against Pakistan ‘A’ with an half-century. Stressing on his performance, he scored back to back centuries – 120[21] and 119* against the same squad. Dhoni scored 362 runs in 7 matches (6 innings, Ave:72.40), and his performance in the series received attention from the then captain – Sourav Ganguly amongst others. However, the India ‘A’ team coach Sandeep Patil recommended Karthik for a place in the Indian squad as wicket-keeper/batsman.

    ODI career:
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    The Indian team in the 2000s saw the use of Rahul Dravid as the wicket-keeper to ensure that the wicket-keeper spot didn’t lack in batting talent. The Indian cricket establishment also saw the entry of wicket-keeper/batsmen from the junior ranks with talents like Parthiv Patel and Dinesh Karthik – both India U-19 Captains in the test squads. With Dhoni making a mark in the India-A squad, he was picked in the ODI squad for the Bangladesh tour in 2004/05. Dhoni did not have a great start to his ODI career, getting run out for a duck on debut. In spite of an average series against Bangladesh, Dhoni was picked for the Pakistan ODI series. In the second match of the series, Dhoni in his fifth one-day international, scored 148 in Vishakapatnam off only 123 deliveries. Dhoni’s 148 erased the earlier record for the highest score by an Indian wicketkeeper, a record that he would re-write before the end of the year.

    Dhoni had few batting opportunities in the first two games of the Sri Lankan bilateral ODI series (October-November 2005) and was promoted to No. 3 in the third ODI at Sawai Mansingh Stadium (Jaipur). Sri Lanka had set India a target of 299 after a Kumar Sangakkara century and in reply. India lost Tendulkar early. Dhoni was promoted to accelerate the scoring and ended the game with an unbeaten 183 off 145 balls, winning the game for India – an innings described in Wisden Almanack (2006) as ‘Uninhibited, yet anything but crude’. The innings set various records including the highest score in ODI cricket in the second innings, a record that still stands. Dhoni ended the series with the highest run aggregate (346) and was awarded the Man of the series award for his efforts. In December 2005, Dhoni was signed by BCCI to a B-grade contract, skipping the initial C-grade level due to his performance on the cricketing field.

    India scored 328 in 50 overs with Dhoni contributing 68 in their first match of 2006 against Pakistan. However the team finished poorly, scoring just 43 runs in the last eight overs and lost the match due to Duckworth-Lewis method. In the third match of the series, Dhoni came in with India in a precarious situation and scored 72 runs off just 46 balls that included 13 boundaries to help India take a 2-1 lead in the series. The final match of the series had a repeat performance as Dhoni scored 77 runs off 56 balls to enable India win the series 4-1. In recognition of his consistent ODI performances, Dhoni overtook Ricky Ponting as number one in the ICC ODI rankings for batsmen on April 20, 2006. His reign lasted just a week as Adam Gilchrist’s performance against Bangladesh moved him to the top spot.

    Two canceled series in Sri Lanka, one due to the withdrawal of South Africa from the Unitech Cup due to security concerns and the replacement 3-match ODI bilateral series against Sri Lanka washed due to rain, was India’s prelude to another disappointing tournament – DLF Cup 2006-07. Dhoni scored 43 runs as the team lost twice in three games and did not qualify for the finals. India’s lack of preparation showed in the 2006 ICC Champions Trophy as they lost to West Indies and Australia, though Dhoni scored an half-century against West Indies. The story of the ODI series in South Africa was the same for both Dhoni and India as Dhoni scored 139 runs in 4 matches and India lost the series 4-0. From the start of the WI ODI series, Dhoni had played 16 matches, hit just two fifties and averaged 25.93. Dhoni received criticism on his wicket keeping technique from former wicketkeeper Syed Kirmani.

    Preparations for the 2007 Cricket World Cup improved as India recorded identical 3-1 victories over West Indies and Sri Lanka and Dhoni had averages in excess of 100 in both these series. However, India unexpectedly crashed out the World Cup after losses to Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Dhoni was out for a duck in both these matches and scored 29 runs in the whole tournament. Dhoni put behind his disappointment in the World cup by scoring 91* against Bangladesh after India were left in a tight spot earlier in the run-chase. Dhoni was declared the man of the match for his performance, his fourth in ODI cricket. He was also later adjudged the man of the series after the third game of the series was washed away. Dhoni had a good Afro-Asia Cup, getting 174 runs in 3 matches at an average of 87.00, with a blitzkrieg 139 not out of 97 balls, a Man Of The Match innings, in the 3rd ODI.

    Dhoni was nominated as the vice-captain of the ODI team for the series against South Africa in Ireland and the subsequent India-England 7-match ODI series. Dhoni, who received a ‘B’ grade contract in December 2005, was awarded an ‘A’ grade contract in June 2007. And also he was elected as captain of Indian Twenty-20 Cricket Team for the World Twenty20 in September 2007. On 2 September 2007 Mahendra Singh Dhoni equalled his idol Adam Gilchrist’s international record for the most dismissals in an innings in ODI by catching 5 English players and stumping one. He led India to the ICC World Twenty 20 trophy in South Africa with a victory over arch rivals Pakistan in an intensely fought final on 24 September 2007, and became the second Indian captain to have won a World cup in any form of cricket, after Kapil Dev.

    Test career:
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    Following his good one-day form against Sri Lanka, Dhoni replaced Dinesh Karthik in December 2005 as the Indian Test wicket-keeper. Dhoni scored 30 runs in his debut match that was marred by rain. Dhoni came to the crease when the team was struggling at 109/5 and as wickets kept falling around him, he played an aggressive innings and was the last man dismissed. Dhoni made his maiden half-century in the second Test and his quick scoring rate (half century came off 51 balls) aided India to set a target of 436 and the Sri Lankans were bowled out for 247.

    India toured Pakistan in January/February 2006 and Dhoni scored his maiden century in the second Test at Faisalabad. India were left in a tight spot as Dhoni was joined by Irfan Pathan with the team still 107 away from avoiding follow-on. Dhoni played his typical aggressive innings as he scored his maiden test century in just 93 balls after scoring his first fifty in just 34 deliveries.

    Dhoni followed his maiden test century with some prosaic batting performances over the next three matches, one against Pakistan that India lost and two against England that had India holding a 1-0 lead going into the test match. Dhoni was the top scorer in India’s first innings in the third test at Wankhede Stadium as his 64 aided India post a respectable 279 in reply to England’s 400. However Dhoni and the Indian fielders dropped too many catches and missed many dismissal chances including a key stumping opportunity of Andrew Flintoff (14). Dhoni failed to collect the Harbhajan Singh delivery cleanly as Flintoff went on to make 36 more runs as England set a target of 313 for the home team, a target that India were never in the reckoning. A batting collapse saw the team being dismissed for 100 and Dhoni scored just 5 runs and faced criticism for his wicket-keeping lapses as well as his shot selections.

    On the West Indies tour, Dhoni scored a quick and aggressive 69 in the first Test at Antigua. The rest of the series was unremarkable for Dhoni as he scored 99 runs in the remaining 6 innings but his wicket-keeping skills improved and Dhoni finished the series with 13 catches and 4 stumpings. In the test series in South Africa, Dhoni’s scores of 34 and 47 were not sufficient to save the second test against the Proteas as India lost the test series 2-1, squandering the chance to build on their first ever Test victory in South Africa (achieved in the first Test match). Dhoni’s bruised hands ruled him out of the third test match.


    Links to more information on M.S Dhoni:

  • Dhoni’s Official Website
  • Cricinfo website – Player profile
  • Sportstar interview
  • Dhoni’s Exclusive Interview in 2005
  • Cricinfo.com Profile on M.S Dhoni

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Adam Gilchrist, महेन्द्र सिंह धोनी, Border-Gavaskar Trophy, India, Mahendra Singh Dhoni, MS Dhoni, ODI Player of the Year 2008, Sachin Tendulkar, Uttarakhand | 1 Comment »

    Player Profile(#36)… Mahendra Singh Dhoni (India)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 3, 2008

    Photobucket

    Mahendra Singh Dhoni or MS Dhoni pronunciation (Hindi: महेन्द्र सिंह धोनी) (born July 7, 1981 in Lavali Village Almora, Uttarakhand) is an Indian cricketer and the current captain of the Indian team. Initially recognized as an extravagantly flamboyant and destructive batsman, Dhoni has come to be regarded as one of the coolest heads to captain the Indian ODI side. Under his captaincy, India won the 2007 ICC World Twenty20, CB Series of 2007-08 and IDEA Cup India-Sri Lanka ODI Series of 2008, the first ever bilateral ODI series win of India in Sri Lanka and The Border-Gavaskar trophy 2008 in which they beat Australia 2-0 thus letting India regain its spot at No.2 in world test rankings(fallen to No.3 after Sri lanka tour). Dhoni also recently captained the ODI team that beat England in the series 5-0.Dhoni is currently ranked the best ODI batsman in the world by the ICC. Mahendra Singh Dhoni was awarded the ODI Player of the Year award in 2008, the first Indian player to achieve this feat.

    Personal life:
    Mahendra Singh Dhoni was born in Ranchi Jharkhand to Pan Singh and Devaki Dev. His paternal village Lvali is in the Lamgarha block of the Almora District of Uttarakhand. Dhoni’s parents, moved from Uttarakhand to Ranchi where Pan Singh worked in junior management positions in MECON. Dhoni has a sister Jayanti and a brother Narendra. Dhoni had long hair which he has now shortened; he cut it because he wanted to look like his favourite film star John Abraham. Dhoni is a fan of Adam Gilchrist, and his childhood idols were cricket teammate Sachin Tendulkar, Bollywood actor Amitabh Bachchan and singer Lata Mangeshkar.

    Dhoni studied at DAV Jawahar Vidya Mandir, Shyamali, Ranchi,Jharkahnd where he initially excelled in badminton and football and was selected at district and club level in these sports. Dhoni was a goalkeeper for his football team and was sent to play cricket for a local cricket club by his football coach. Though he had not played cricket, Dhoni impressed with his wicket-keeping skills and became the regular wicketkeeper at the Commando cricket club (1995 – 1998). Based on his performance at club cricket, he was picked for the 1997/98 season Vinoo Mankad Trophy Under-16 Championship and he performed well. Dhoni focused on cricket after his 10th standard.


    Playing Style:

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    Dhoni is an aggressive right-handed batsman and wicket-keeper. Dhoni is one of a number of wicket-keepers who have come through the ranks of junior and India A cricket teams to represent the national team — Parthiv Patel, Ajay Ratra and Dinesh Karthik also followed this route. Dhoni, referred to as ‘Mahi’ by his friends, debuted in the Bihar cricket team during the 1998/99 cricket season and was selected to represent India-A for a tour to Kenya in 2004. Along with Gautam Gambhir, Dhoni made multiple centuries against the Pakistan-A team in a tri-nation series and was selected in the Indian national team later in that year.[citation needed]

    Dhoni tends to play mostly from the back foot with a pronounced bottom hand grip.He has a very fast hand speed through the ball which often results in the ball racing across the ground.From this initial stance his feets do not show much movement which sometimes results in chasing balls while not coming to the pitch of the ball or inside edging a lot of balls.

    Dhoni scored 148 against Pakistan in his fifth ODI match in 2005 — then the highest score by an Indian wicketkeeper. Later in the year, he broke his own record as well as set the current world record for the highest score in the second innings in ODI matches as he scored 183* against Sri Lanka. Dhoni’s success in the limited overs format secured him a place in the test team. Consistent performances in ODI cricket through the end of the 2005/06 season saw Dhoni briefly ranked as the No. 1 batsman in the ICC ODI ratings.[citation needed]

    Dhoni’s form dipped through 2006 as India lost matches at the ICC Champions trophy, DLF Cup, away bilateral series against West Indies and South Africa. A return to form in the home series against West Indies and SriLanka in early 2007 proved to be an inaccurate indicator of Dhoni’s form as India crashed out of the first round in the 2007 Cricket World Cup. Dhoni was out for a duck in both India’s losses. After the World Cup, Dhoni won the Man of the series award in the bilateral ODI tournament against Bangladesh. For the tour of England, Dhoni was named the ODI team vice-captain.

    As a batsman, Dhoni has shown the maturity to restrain his aggressive nature and play a responsible innings when the situation requires. Apart from traditional shots, Dhoni has two very unorthodox but effective cricket strokes. Since his entry into the Indian cricket team, Dhoni’s aggressive batting style, success on the field, personality, and long hair have made him one of the most marketable cricketers in India.

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    Domestic career:

    Junior cricket:
    Dhoni was included in the Bihar U-19 squad for the 1998/99 season and scored 176 runs in 5 matches (7 innings) as the team finished fourth in the group of six and did not make it to the quarter finals. Dhoni was not picked for the East Zone U-19 squad (CK Nayudu Trophy) and Rest of India squad (MA Chidambaram Trophy and Vinoo Mankad Trophy). Bihar U-19 cricket team advanced to the finals of the 1999-2000 Cooch Behar Trophy where Dhoni made 84 to help Bihar post a total of 357. Bihar’s efforts were dwarfed by Punjab U-19’s 839 with Dhoni’s future national squad teammate Yuvraj Singh making 358. Dhoni’s contribution for the tournament included 488 runs (9 matches, 12 innings), 5 fifties, 17 catches and 7 stumpings. MS Dhoni made it to the East Zone U-19 squad for the CK Nayudu trophy but scored only 97 runs in four matches as East Zone lost all four matches and finished last in the tournament.

    Bihar team:
    Dhoni made his Ranji Trophy debut for Bihar in the 1999-2000 season as an eighteen year old. He made a half century in his debut match scoring 68* in the second innings against Assam cricket team. Dhoni finished the season with 283 runs in 5 matches. Dhoni scored his maiden first-class century against Bengal in the 2000/01 season in a losing cause. Apart from the century, his performance in the 2000/01[14] did not include another score over fifty and in 2001/02 season he scored just five fifty in each season in four Ranji matches. Dhoni’s performance for the 2002/03 season in the Ranji Trophy included three half centuries in the Ranji Trophy and a couple of half-centuries in the Deodhar Trophy competition as he started winning recognition for his lower-order run contribution as well as hard hitting batting style.

    In the 2003/04 season, Dhoni scored a century (128*) against Assam in the first match of the Ranji ODI trophy. He was part of the East Zone squad that won the Deodhar Trophy for the year and contributed with 244 runs in 4 matches. In the Duleep Trophy finals, Dhoni was picked over International cricketer Deep Dasgupta to represent East zone. He scored a fighting half century in the second innings in a losing cause.

    India A team:
    He was recognized for his efforts in the 2003/04 season, especially in the ODI format and was picked for the India A squad for a tour of Zimbabwe and Kenya. Against the Zimbabwe XI in Harare Sports Club, Dhoni had his best wicket-keeping effort with 7 catches and 4 stumpings in the match. In the tri-nation tournament involving Kenya, India ‘A’ and Pakistan ‘A’, Dhoni helped India ‘A’ chase their target of 223 against Pakistan ‘A’ with an half-century. Stressing on his performance, he scored back to back centuries – 120[21] and 119* against the same squad. Dhoni scored 362 runs in 7 matches (6 innings, Ave:72.40), and his performance in the series received attention from the then captain – Sourav Ganguly amongst others. However, the India ‘A’ team coach Sandeep Patil recommended Karthik for a place in the Indian squad as wicket-keeper/batsman.

    ODI career:
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    The Indian team in the 2000s saw the use of Rahul Dravid as the wicket-keeper to ensure that the wicket-keeper spot didn’t lack in batting talent. The Indian cricket establishment also saw the entry of wicket-keeper/batsmen from the junior ranks with talents like Parthiv Patel and Dinesh Karthik – both India U-19 Captains in the test squads. With Dhoni making a mark in the India-A squad, he was picked in the ODI squad for the Bangladesh tour in 2004/05. Dhoni did not have a great start to his ODI career, getting run out for a duck on debut. In spite of an average series against Bangladesh, Dhoni was picked for the Pakistan ODI series. In the second match of the series, Dhoni in his fifth one-day international, scored 148 in Vishakapatnam off only 123 deliveries. Dhoni’s 148 erased the earlier record for the highest score by an Indian wicketkeeper, a record that he would re-write before the end of the year.

    Dhoni had few batting opportunities in the first two games of the Sri Lankan bilateral ODI series (October-November 2005) and was promoted to No. 3 in the third ODI at Sawai Mansingh Stadium (Jaipur). Sri Lanka had set India a target of 299 after a Kumar Sangakkara century and in reply. India lost Tendulkar early. Dhoni was promoted to accelerate the scoring and ended the game with an unbeaten 183 off 145 balls, winning the game for India – an innings described in Wisden Almanack (2006) as ‘Uninhibited, yet anything but crude’. The innings set various records including the highest score in ODI cricket in the second innings, a record that still stands. Dhoni ended the series with the highest run aggregate (346) and was awarded the Man of the series award for his efforts. In December 2005, Dhoni was signed by BCCI to a B-grade contract, skipping the initial C-grade level due to his performance on the cricketing field.

    India scored 328 in 50 overs with Dhoni contributing 68 in their first match of 2006 against Pakistan. However the team finished poorly, scoring just 43 runs in the last eight overs and lost the match due to Duckworth-Lewis method. In the third match of the series, Dhoni came in with India in a precarious situation and scored 72 runs off just 46 balls that included 13 boundaries to help India take a 2-1 lead in the series. The final match of the series had a repeat performance as Dhoni scored 77 runs off 56 balls to enable India win the series 4-1. In recognition of his consistent ODI performances, Dhoni overtook Ricky Ponting as number one in the ICC ODI rankings for batsmen on April 20, 2006. His reign lasted just a week as Adam Gilchrist’s performance against Bangladesh moved him to the top spot.

    Two canceled series in Sri Lanka, one due to the withdrawal of South Africa from the Unitech Cup due to security concerns and the replacement 3-match ODI bilateral series against Sri Lanka washed due to rain, was India’s prelude to another disappointing tournament – DLF Cup 2006-07. Dhoni scored 43 runs as the team lost twice in three games and did not qualify for the finals. India’s lack of preparation showed in the 2006 ICC Champions Trophy as they lost to West Indies and Australia, though Dhoni scored an half-century against West Indies. The story of the ODI series in South Africa was the same for both Dhoni and India as Dhoni scored 139 runs in 4 matches and India lost the series 4-0. From the start of the WI ODI series, Dhoni had played 16 matches, hit just two fifties and averaged 25.93. Dhoni received criticism on his wicket keeping technique from former wicketkeeper Syed Kirmani.

    Preparations for the 2007 Cricket World Cup improved as India recorded identical 3-1 victories over West Indies and Sri Lanka and Dhoni had averages in excess of 100 in both these series. However, India unexpectedly crashed out the World Cup after losses to Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Dhoni was out for a duck in both these matches and scored 29 runs in the whole tournament. Dhoni put behind his disappointment in the World cup by scoring 91* against Bangladesh after India were left in a tight spot earlier in the run-chase. Dhoni was declared the man of the match for his performance, his fourth in ODI cricket. He was also later adjudged the man of the series after the third game of the series was washed away. Dhoni had a good Afro-Asia Cup, getting 174 runs in 3 matches at an average of 87.00, with a blitzkrieg 139 not out of 97 balls, a Man Of The Match innings, in the 3rd ODI.

    Dhoni was nominated as the vice-captain of the ODI team for the series against South Africa in Ireland and the subsequent India-England 7-match ODI series. Dhoni, who received a ‘B’ grade contract in December 2005, was awarded an ‘A’ grade contract in June 2007. And also he was elected as captain of Indian Twenty-20 Cricket Team for the World Twenty20 in September 2007. On 2 September 2007 Mahendra Singh Dhoni equalled his idol Adam Gilchrist’s international record for the most dismissals in an innings in ODI by catching 5 English players and stumping one. He led India to the ICC World Twenty 20 trophy in South Africa with a victory over arch rivals Pakistan in an intensely fought final on 24 September 2007, and became the second Indian captain to have won a World cup in any form of cricket, after Kapil Dev.

    Test career:
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    Following his good one-day form against Sri Lanka, Dhoni replaced Dinesh Karthik in December 2005 as the Indian Test wicket-keeper. Dhoni scored 30 runs in his debut match that was marred by rain. Dhoni came to the crease when the team was struggling at 109/5 and as wickets kept falling around him, he played an aggressive innings and was the last man dismissed. Dhoni made his maiden half-century in the second Test and his quick scoring rate (half century came off 51 balls) aided India to set a target of 436 and the Sri Lankans were bowled out for 247.

    India toured Pakistan in January/February 2006 and Dhoni scored his maiden century in the second Test at Faisalabad. India were left in a tight spot as Dhoni was joined by Irfan Pathan with the team still 107 away from avoiding follow-on. Dhoni played his typical aggressive innings as he scored his maiden test century in just 93 balls after scoring his first fifty in just 34 deliveries.

    Dhoni followed his maiden test century with some prosaic batting performances over the next three matches, one against Pakistan that India lost and two against England that had India holding a 1-0 lead going into the test match. Dhoni was the top scorer in India’s first innings in the third test at Wankhede Stadium as his 64 aided India post a respectable 279 in reply to England’s 400. However Dhoni and the Indian fielders dropped too many catches and missed many dismissal chances including a key stumping opportunity of Andrew Flintoff (14). Dhoni failed to collect the Harbhajan Singh delivery cleanly as Flintoff went on to make 36 more runs as England set a target of 313 for the home team, a target that India were never in the reckoning. A batting collapse saw the team being dismissed for 100 and Dhoni scored just 5 runs and faced criticism for his wicket-keeping lapses as well as his shot selections.

    On the West Indies tour, Dhoni scored a quick and aggressive 69 in the first Test at Antigua. The rest of the series was unremarkable for Dhoni as he scored 99 runs in the remaining 6 innings but his wicket-keeping skills improved and Dhoni finished the series with 13 catches and 4 stumpings. In the test series in South Africa, Dhoni’s scores of 34 and 47 were not sufficient to save the second test against the Proteas as India lost the test series 2-1, squandering the chance to build on their first ever Test victory in South Africa (achieved in the first Test match). Dhoni’s bruised hands ruled him out of the third test match.


    Links to more information on M.S Dhoni:

  • Dhoni’s Official Website
  • Cricinfo website – Player profile
  • Sportstar interview
  • Dhoni’s Exclusive Interview in 2005
  • Cricinfo.com Profile on M.S Dhoni

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Adam Gilchrist, महेन्द्र सिंह धोनी, Border-Gavaskar Trophy, India, Mahendra Singh Dhoni, MS Dhoni, ODI Player of the Year 2008, Sachin Tendulkar, Uttarakhand | 1 Comment »

    Has Australia’s dominance in world cricket come to an end?

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 12, 2008

    With the 2- nil series loss to India in the Border-Gavaskar series it appears the Aussie’s dominance in world cricket may be coming to an end. They have had a good stronghold on the game since the mid 1990s when players like Shane Warne, Glenn McGrath and co came onto the scene and began strengthening their sublime mix of skill, accuracy and consistency and thus putting in elite performances for over a decade.

    With these players retirements and new blood coming into the side it appears the Australian cricket is entering a rebuilding phase. While people might not think this when they start their 2 test series against New Zealand later on it will be against stronger, more experienced opposition that many people might think their dominance on the game is loosening its grip.

    It is a fact of life, that people grow old and become a bit slower, more susceptible to injuries, and feel like they need to devote more time to their families, and it is upto the new team players coming into the side to hone the skills and knowledge of their predecessors to carry on their sides legacy. As every cricket fan must know, Australia has a big legacy in world cricket, and they are more than capable of fighting out of some precarious situations and newer players building upon the legacy the side has created and then build a strong legacy of their own.

    Every side seems to experience their rises and falls. For instance, remember the great West Indies side of the 80s, New Zealand having a dream decade in the 80s as well (when Richard Hadlee was dominating batsman all over the world with his bowling), and even Zimbabwe before politics caused the exodus of famous players like Heath Streak, Grant and Andy Flower, Paul Strang and co. It is up to players coming into the side to strive for excellence and to carry the side through the good times and the bad.

    Here is some links to the Aussie’s recent results in India:

  • India v Australia 4th Test in Nagpur, 6-10 November 2008
  • Australia tour of India September to November 2008
  • Posted in Australia, Border-Gavaskar Trophy, circle of life, dominance, India, retirement | Leave a Comment »

    Has Australia’s dominance in world cricket come to an end?

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 12, 2008

    With the 2- nil series loss to India in the Border-Gavaskar series it appears the Aussie’s dominance in world cricket may be coming to an end. They have had a good stronghold on the game since the mid 1990s when players like Shane Warne, Glenn McGrath and co came onto the scene and began strengthening their sublime mix of skill, accuracy and consistency and thus putting in elite performances for over a decade.

    With these players retirements and new blood coming into the side it appears the Australian cricket is entering a rebuilding phase. While people might not think this when they start their 2 test series against New Zealand later on it will be against stronger, more experienced opposition that many people might think their dominance on the game is loosening its grip.

    It is a fact of life, that people grow old and become a bit slower, more susceptible to injuries, and feel like they need to devote more time to their families, and it is upto the new team players coming into the side to hone the skills and knowledge of their predecessors to carry on their sides legacy. As every cricket fan must know, Australia has a big legacy in world cricket, and they are more than capable of fighting out of some precarious situations and newer players building upon the legacy the side has created and then build a strong legacy of their own.

    Every side seems to experience their rises and falls. For instance, remember the great West Indies side of the 80s, New Zealand having a dream decade in the 80s as well (when Richard Hadlee was dominating batsman all over the world with his bowling), and even Zimbabwe before politics caused the exodus of famous players like Heath Streak, Grant and Andy Flower, Paul Strang and co. It is up to players coming into the side to strive for excellence and to carry the side through the good times and the bad.

    Here is some links to the Aussie’s recent results in India:

  • India v Australia 4th Test in Nagpur, 6-10 November 2008
  • Australia tour of India September to November 2008
  • Posted in Australia, Border-Gavaskar Trophy, circle of life, dominance, India, retirement | Leave a Comment »

    New Zealand Cricket Test, ODI and Twenty20 schedule

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 6, 2008

    Here is a schedule of the games that are going to be played by New Zealand at home during the 2007/2008 home summer season. Make sure you proudly show your support for your favourite teams and make this summer of cricket an entertaining occasion, and who knows, you could be made famous by showing some enthusiasm and dedicated support for your team.

    If you are a BlackCaps supporter lets attend the games’ dressed in black and on mass and let Bangladesh, West Indies and India know that we are a force to be reckoned with!

    Here is the Black Cap’s home schedule for the home summer season of 2008/2009:

    2008:

    West Indies in NZ

    Test
    Dec 11-15: New Zealand v West Indies Dunedin
    Dec 19-23: New Zealand v West Indies Napier

    Twenty20
    Dec 26: New Zealand v West Indies Auckland
    Dec 28: New Zealand v West Indies Hamilton

    2009

    One-day matches
    Dec 31 New Zealand v West Indies Queenstown
    Jan 3 New Zealand v West Indies Christchurch
    Jan 7 New Zealand v West Indies Wellington
    Jan 10 New Zealand v West Indies Auckland
    Jan 13 New Zealand v West Indies Napier

    India in NZ

    Twenty 20
    Mar 6 New Zealand v India Wellington

    One-day matches
    Mar 8 New Zealand v India Napier
    Mar 11 New Zealand v India Hamilton
    Mar 14 New Zealand v India Auckland
    Mar 17 New Zealand v India Wellington
    Mar 20 New Zealand v India Christchurch

    First class match
    Mar 22-24 New Zealand v India Lincoln, Canterbury

    Test Matches
    Mar 26-30 New Zealand v India Hamilton
    Apr 3-7 New Zealand v India Wellington

    Posted in black caps, First Class Cricket, India, new zealand, ODI, Schedule, Test, twenty20, West Indies | Leave a Comment »

    New Zealand Cricket Test, ODI and Twenty20 schedule

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 6, 2008

    Here is a schedule of the games that are going to be played by New Zealand at home during the 2007/2008 home summer season. Make sure you proudly show your support for your favourite teams and make this summer of cricket an entertaining occasion, and who knows, you could be made famous by showing some enthusiasm and dedicated support for your team.

    If you are a BlackCaps supporter lets attend the games’ dressed in black and on mass and let Bangladesh, West Indies and India know that we are a force to be reckoned with!

    Here is the Black Cap’s home schedule for the home summer season of 2008/2009:

    2008:

    West Indies in NZ

    Test
    Dec 11-15: New Zealand v West Indies Dunedin
    Dec 19-23: New Zealand v West Indies Napier

    Twenty20
    Dec 26: New Zealand v West Indies Auckland
    Dec 28: New Zealand v West Indies Hamilton

    2009

    One-day matches
    Dec 31 New Zealand v West Indies Queenstown
    Jan 3 New Zealand v West Indies Christchurch
    Jan 7 New Zealand v West Indies Wellington
    Jan 10 New Zealand v West Indies Auckland
    Jan 13 New Zealand v West Indies Napier

    India in NZ

    Twenty 20
    Mar 6 New Zealand v India Wellington

    One-day matches
    Mar 8 New Zealand v India Napier
    Mar 11 New Zealand v India Hamilton
    Mar 14 New Zealand v India Auckland
    Mar 17 New Zealand v India Wellington
    Mar 20 New Zealand v India Christchurch

    First class match
    Mar 22-24 New Zealand v India Lincoln, Canterbury

    Test Matches
    Mar 26-30 New Zealand v India Hamilton
    Apr 3-7 New Zealand v India Wellington

    Posted in black caps, First Class Cricket, India, new zealand, ODI, Schedule, Test, twenty20, West Indies | Leave a Comment »