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Archive for the ‘Googly’ Category

Player Profile(#47)…Danish Kaneria (Pakistan)

Posted by wildkiwi25 on January 21, 2009

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Danish Parabha Shanker Kaneria (Urdu: دانش پرابھا شنکر کنیریا) (born 16 December 1980), is a Pakistani cricketer (leg spin bowler). He was born in Karachi. He made his international debut in 2000 against England at Faisalabad. Kaneria has continued the tradition of Pakistani leg spin bowlers and possesses a very well disguised googly. However his failure to develop an effective straighter delivery has prevented him from reaching his full potential.

In January 2002, he took 7 wickets for 77 runs in the Test match against Bangladesh in Bangladesh, which are his career best figures so far in Test cricket. Earlier, in the same season, he had taken 6 wickets in an innings twice against Bangladesh during Bangladesh’s tour of Pakistan. In October 2004, he took 10 wickets against Sri Lanka at Karachi, with a second-innings haul of 7/109, setting up Pakistan’s 6-wicket win. More recently he has played an important role in Pakistan’s Test wins over West Indies, England and India.

In One Day International cricket, he has been economical so far with an economy rate under 4.8 runs per over. His best bowling in ODIs came against New Zealand in Sri Lanka in 2003. He also had a good series against Zimbabwe in Sharjah just before that. He also impressed in English county cricket taking 32 wickets in seven championship matches for Essex in 2005. Although unable to play English county cricket in 2006 due to Pakistan’s tour of England, it has been confirmed that Kaneria would return to play for Essex in 2007.

Success in the one day arena has been more elusive, Pakistan usually opting to play the two spinning all-rounders Shahid Afridi and Shoaib Malik instead.

Despite representing the Muslim-majority Country of Pakistan, Kaneria is a devout Hindu and is of Marwari heritage. He is only the second Hindu to play Test cricket for Pakistan (the first, his cousin Anil Dalpat, was briefly their wicketkeeper).

Kaneria suffered a broken finger in Essex’s LV County Championship Division Two match against Worcestershire at Colchester on August 21, 2008. The bowler was injured attempting to take a catch off Ben Smith. An X-ray confirmed he had broken a finger and may miss the remainder of the 2008 English domestic season.

Links to more information on Danish Kaneria:

  • Danish Kaneria on Cricinfo.com
  • Danish Kaneria Interview
  • Danish Kaneria’s Official site on BigStarCricket.com

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    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

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    Posted in Danish Kaneria, Danish Parabha Shanker Kaneria, Essex, Essex Eagles, Googly, Karachi, Leg Spinner, Pakistan, دانش پرابھا شنکر کنیریا | Leave a Comment »

    Spin Bowling Success Tips

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 8, 2008

    The spin bowler is a key element in the bowling line up of any cricket team, the skill of Shane Warne and Muttiah Muralitharan has highlighted the potential and the shear power and influence a high class spin bowler can have in the game of cricket. The spin bowler can be used to slow the game, add pressure and most importantly attack batsmen. The spin bowler moves the ball off the pitch turning it sideways, as the spinning ball grips the pitch and turns and can also cause it to bounce variably.

    A good spin bowler needs to be able to bowl a consistent line and length, is able to turn the ball, which requires lots of practice and dedication to succeed. If you are a spin bowler you should try and experiment with varying degrees of flight, speed, and angle of approach in order to deceive the batsmen.

    There are two recognised types of spin bowlers, which are, finger spinners who are classed as the orthodox technique and use their index finger (first finger) to spin the ball and the wrist spinners who use the wrist more than fingers to spin ball.

    Target areas:

    Off spin: The off spinner aims to spin the ball from a right handed batsmen’s off side towards the leg side. Try to bowl just outside of the off stump so that the ball turns and hits the stumps, also try to entice the batsmen forward on to the front foot by bowling a full length.

    Leg spin: The leg spinner aims to bowl the ball so that it spins from a right handed batsmen’s leg side to the off side. Again try to pitch the ball up to the batsman to get them coming forward. Pitch the ball inline with the wickets so that the ball turns to hit the top of the off stump.

    The grip:

    Leg spin: Use the first two fingers to grip the ball horizontally across the seam, your third finger should be bent and running along the seam. Your thumb should rest lightly on seam and the spin is generated primarily by the third finger.

    Off spin: Again grip the ball with your first two fingers horizontally across the seam and try to spread as wide as possible apart the joints of index and middle finger. The ball then rests lightly on third finger and thumb, the spin is and produced and passed on mainly through the index finger.

    The delivery:
    The off spin delivery, should start with an angled and short delivery stride. You should then pivot on ball of the front foot keeping your bowling arm high. Cock your wrist inwards and drive your back leg through to help rotate the body. Release the ball by turning your wrist sharply from left to right and by pulling down on seam with the index finger to generate spin. The back of hand should face the off side or upwards at finish of the delivery, don’t forget to follow through properly. Keep your head as upright as possible throughout the delivery and your eyes fixed on the target at all times.

    The leg spin delivery is very similar to the off spin except with a few subtle and important variations. Your approach should be somewhat longer and have a slightly angled approach towards the target.

    As you bowl you should raise your lead arm towards the target and bowl with a braced front leg (your weight should be through this leg). Pivot on the ball of the lead foot and bring your bowling arm up high with your wrist cocked outwards. Drive your back leg through and release the ball. Generate the spin by rotating your wrist from right to left and by most importantly using the third finger to impart the most spin. Finish with your palm facing leg side.

    Follow through by rotating shoulders through the line of the wickets and driving your back leg through the action so that your hips rotate over your front foot. Keep your hips and shoulders inline and head as upright as possible throughout the delivery and your eyes fixed on the target at all times.

    The Googly and the Doosra: Deceptive deliveries
    The googly is bowled by a leg spinner and is a ball that appears to look like a leg spinner when it’s bowled but then moves unexpectedly in the opposite direction after it pitches. It’s bowled out of the back of the hand and requires the shoulder to be dropped a little at the point of release. A great example of a bowler who has mastered the googly is Shane Warne.

    The doosra is bowled by an off spinner and is a ball that initially seems to look like an off spinner when it’s bowled but then moves unexpectedly in the opposite direction after it pitches. The doosra has been pioneered by the Sri Lanka great Muttiah Muralitharan and is very difficult to bowl. Muralitharan reputedly practiced the delivery for 2-3 years in the nets and practice before using it in first class cricket…I can’t bowl it so I’m not going to go into it!

    The power and rotation on the ball are generated through a strong action and is enhanced by flicking the wrist and straightening the fingers at the point of release. Always try and spin the ball as much as you can, your consistency and accuracy will come with practice and hard work. Remember to bowl your spinners with oomph and purpose, don’t just throw it up and hope for the best.

    Tip: Examine the pitch before bowling and try to identify areas of rough, cracks and other features on the wicket to aim at which may cause increased spin, variable bounce or erratic ball behaviour when pitched on and aim to bowl the ball into these areas provided they don’t cause you to bowl bad deliveries (e.g. short and wide).

    Visit www.CricketSecrets.com right now to pick up a free report to help you improve your spin bowling today!

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway.

    Posted in doosra, drift, flight, Googly, guile, how to bowl leg spin, how to bowl off spin, Spin, Spin bowling, Spinner | Leave a Comment »

    Spin Bowling Success Tips

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 8, 2008

    The spin bowler is a key element in the bowling line up of any cricket team, the skill of Shane Warne and Muttiah Muralitharan has highlighted the potential and the shear power and influence a high class spin bowler can have in the game of cricket. The spin bowler can be used to slow the game, add pressure and most importantly attack batsmen. The spin bowler moves the ball off the pitch turning it sideways, as the spinning ball grips the pitch and turns and can also cause it to bounce variably.

    A good spin bowler needs to be able to bowl a consistent line and length, is able to turn the ball, which requires lots of practice and dedication to succeed. If you are a spin bowler you should try and experiment with varying degrees of flight, speed, and angle of approach in order to deceive the batsmen.

    There are two recognised types of spin bowlers, which are, finger spinners who are classed as the orthodox technique and use their index finger (first finger) to spin the ball and the wrist spinners who use the wrist more than fingers to spin ball.

    Target areas:

    Off spin: The off spinner aims to spin the ball from a right handed batsmen’s off side towards the leg side. Try to bowl just outside of the off stump so that the ball turns and hits the stumps, also try to entice the batsmen forward on to the front foot by bowling a full length.

    Leg spin: The leg spinner aims to bowl the ball so that it spins from a right handed batsmen’s leg side to the off side. Again try to pitch the ball up to the batsman to get them coming forward. Pitch the ball inline with the wickets so that the ball turns to hit the top of the off stump.

    The grip:

    Leg spin: Use the first two fingers to grip the ball horizontally across the seam, your third finger should be bent and running along the seam. Your thumb should rest lightly on seam and the spin is generated primarily by the third finger.

    Off spin: Again grip the ball with your first two fingers horizontally across the seam and try to spread as wide as possible apart the joints of index and middle finger. The ball then rests lightly on third finger and thumb, the spin is and produced and passed on mainly through the index finger.

    The delivery:
    The off spin delivery, should start with an angled and short delivery stride. You should then pivot on ball of the front foot keeping your bowling arm high. Cock your wrist inwards and drive your back leg through to help rotate the body. Release the ball by turning your wrist sharply from left to right and by pulling down on seam with the index finger to generate spin. The back of hand should face the off side or upwards at finish of the delivery, don’t forget to follow through properly. Keep your head as upright as possible throughout the delivery and your eyes fixed on the target at all times.

    The leg spin delivery is very similar to the off spin except with a few subtle and important variations. Your approach should be somewhat longer and have a slightly angled approach towards the target.

    As you bowl you should raise your lead arm towards the target and bowl with a braced front leg (your weight should be through this leg). Pivot on the ball of the lead foot and bring your bowling arm up high with your wrist cocked outwards. Drive your back leg through and release the ball. Generate the spin by rotating your wrist from right to left and by most importantly using the third finger to impart the most spin. Finish with your palm facing leg side.

    Follow through by rotating shoulders through the line of the wickets and driving your back leg through the action so that your hips rotate over your front foot. Keep your hips and shoulders inline and head as upright as possible throughout the delivery and your eyes fixed on the target at all times.

    The Googly and the Doosra: Deceptive deliveries
    The googly is bowled by a leg spinner and is a ball that appears to look like a leg spinner when it’s bowled but then moves unexpectedly in the opposite direction after it pitches. It’s bowled out of the back of the hand and requires the shoulder to be dropped a little at the point of release. A great example of a bowler who has mastered the googly is Shane Warne.

    The doosra is bowled by an off spinner and is a ball that initially seems to look like an off spinner when it’s bowled but then moves unexpectedly in the opposite direction after it pitches. The doosra has been pioneered by the Sri Lanka great Muttiah Muralitharan and is very difficult to bowl. Muralitharan reputedly practiced the delivery for 2-3 years in the nets and practice before using it in first class cricket…I can’t bowl it so I’m not going to go into it!

    The power and rotation on the ball are generated through a strong action and is enhanced by flicking the wrist and straightening the fingers at the point of release. Always try and spin the ball as much as you can, your consistency and accuracy will come with practice and hard work. Remember to bowl your spinners with oomph and purpose, don’t just throw it up and hope for the best.

    Tip: Examine the pitch before bowling and try to identify areas of rough, cracks and other features on the wicket to aim at which may cause increased spin, variable bounce or erratic ball behaviour when pitched on and aim to bowl the ball into these areas provided they don’t cause you to bowl bad deliveries (e.g. short and wide).

    Visit www.CricketSecrets.com right now to pick up a free report to help you improve your spin bowling today!

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway.

    Posted in doosra, drift, flight, Googly, guile, how to bowl leg spin, how to bowl off spin, Spin, Spin bowling, Spinner | Leave a Comment »

    The Year 2006, and the adventures of Big Warnie in London

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on April 22, 2008

    Hey all!

    I was playing Brett Lee Backyard Cricket before and came across these videos of an ad Campain for The 2006 Ashes Series in England, I know it was about a couple of years ago but I loved the vids! They were very well put together and the English public didn’t look too impressed, and even though I’m a kiwi I have to hand it to the Aussies it was a masterpiece to watch, thoroughly brilliant! (hmmmmm I wonder if we can get a giant Kiwi statue and do the same…). If you would like to check them out for yourself feel free to click on the banner below:)

    *Full acknowledgements to the Australian Cricket Board

    Posted in 2006 Ashes Series, Big Warnie, England, Flipper, Googly, Leg spin, London, Piccadilly, Poms, Shane Warne, Statue of Shane Warne, Warnie | Leave a Comment »

    The Year 2006, and the adventures of Big Warnie in London

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on April 22, 2008

    Hey all!

    I was playing Brett Lee Backyard Cricket before and came across these videos of an ad Campain for The 2006 Ashes Series in England, I know it was about a couple of years ago but I loved the vids! They were very well put together and the English public didn’t look too impressed, and even though I’m a kiwi I have to hand it to the Aussies it was a masterpiece to watch, thoroughly brilliant! (hmmmmm I wonder if we can get a giant Kiwi statue and do the same…). If you would like to check them out for yourself feel free to click on the banner below:)

    *Full acknowledgements to the Australian Cricket Board

    Posted in 2006 Ashes Series, Big Warnie, England, Flipper, Googly, Leg spin, London, Piccadilly, Poms, Shane Warne, Statue of Shane Warne, Warnie | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#15)…Paul Adams(South Africa)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on April 9, 2008

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    Paul Adams

    Paul Regan Adams (born 20 January 1977 in Cape Town) is a South African cricketer, a chinaman bowler who has played for the national team sporadically since the 1990s.

    Adams’s bowling action is highly unorthodox and Mike Gatting famously likened it to a “frog in a blender”. Though his action initially caught world batsmen by surprise, he was soon exposed for lack of variety by the Australians. As such, he became less effective. However in December 2006 he was recalled to the Test side for the series against India, only to be dropped from the squad before the first Test.

    Paul Adams broke onto the scene as an 18-year-old when they visited South Africa in 1995-96. The action itself contributed to his burgeoning wicket-haul for at least a year as batsmen were hopelessly caught in the blurry glare of the impossible contortion. But as soon as the element of surprise wore off, Adams often suffered for a lack of variety and his appearances for South Africa grew fewer. When first discovered by former South Africa great Eddie Barlow, Adams knew nothing of googlies and chinamen, calling his deliveries simply “inspinners” and “outspinners”. His head points skyward at the moment of delivery, yet he appears to be able to change his trajectory if the batsman uses his feet. Although photographic evidence suggests otherwise, Adams says he can see enough of the batsman to know what he is doing. His career has been hampered by injury at crucial times, and he lost his No. 1 slow-bowler spot to Nicky Boje, but no left-arm spinner has taken more Test wickets for South Africa. Known as Gogga, meaning insect, or simply Goges to his friends, Adams is a bundle of energy, with a taste in music some of his team-mates find hard to understand.

    Links relating to Paul Adams:

  • Leggie in the mirror (Sep 13, 2007)
  • Long live the tail (Jan 16, 2007)
  • Hafeez and Farhat lead run-feast (Jan 6, 2007)
  • South Africa recall Paul Adams for Tests (Dec 7, 2006)
  • Three-card trick (Oct 17, 2006)
  • View the full list of 38 related articles

    *Acknowledgements to Neil Manthorp, Cricinfo.com,Wikipedia.org

  • Posted in Chinaman, Gogga, Googly, Paul Adams, South Africa, Spinner | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#15)…Paul Adams(South Africa)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on April 9, 2008

    Photobucket

    Paul Adams

    Paul Regan Adams (born 20 January 1977 in Cape Town) is a South African cricketer, a chinaman bowler who has played for the national team sporadically since the 1990s.

    Adams’s bowling action is highly unorthodox and Mike Gatting famously likened it to a “frog in a blender”. Though his action initially caught world batsmen by surprise, he was soon exposed for lack of variety by the Australians. As such, he became less effective. However in December 2006 he was recalled to the Test side for the series against India, only to be dropped from the squad before the first Test.

    Paul Adams broke onto the scene as an 18-year-old when they visited South Africa in 1995-96. The action itself contributed to his burgeoning wicket-haul for at least a year as batsmen were hopelessly caught in the blurry glare of the impossible contortion. But as soon as the element of surprise wore off, Adams often suffered for a lack of variety and his appearances for South Africa grew fewer. When first discovered by former South Africa great Eddie Barlow, Adams knew nothing of googlies and chinamen, calling his deliveries simply “inspinners” and “outspinners”. His head points skyward at the moment of delivery, yet he appears to be able to change his trajectory if the batsman uses his feet. Although photographic evidence suggests otherwise, Adams says he can see enough of the batsman to know what he is doing. His career has been hampered by injury at crucial times, and he lost his No. 1 slow-bowler spot to Nicky Boje, but no left-arm spinner has taken more Test wickets for South Africa. Known as Gogga, meaning insect, or simply Goges to his friends, Adams is a bundle of energy, with a taste in music some of his team-mates find hard to understand.

    Links relating to Paul Adams:

  • Leggie in the mirror (Sep 13, 2007)
  • Long live the tail (Jan 16, 2007)
  • Hafeez and Farhat lead run-feast (Jan 6, 2007)
  • South Africa recall Paul Adams for Tests (Dec 7, 2006)
  • Three-card trick (Oct 17, 2006)

  • View the full list of 38 related articles

    *Acknowledgements to Neil Manthorp, Cricinfo.com,Wikipedia.org,

  • Posted in Chinaman, Gogga, Googly, Paul Adams, South Africa, Spinner | Leave a Comment »