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Archive for the ‘Cricket’ Category

Tips for Buying a New Cricket Bat

Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 24, 2008

When it comes to buying a new cricket bat there are a number of factors that you need to address before making your final decision to purchase a new cricket bat, such as:

– The brand,

– The size,

– The model,

– The weight,

…these are just a few factors to consider.

This article will look briefly at a few tips to follow when it comes to replacing your old favourite bat with a new cricket bat.

Choosing a cricket bat based on its brand really comes down to personally preference, as realistically there is not much major difference between brands. They all have cricket bats with similar attributes and features; it is the variation between models that I would pay closer attention too, not the brand name. However it is worth mentioning that some of the new Kookaburra cricket bat models are almost unique, as some are now reinforced with a new graphite matrix, giving “maximum power transfer and increased strength”.

When buying a new cricket bat, carefully select the model of cricket bat that most suitably fits your style of play. As some bats are designed specifically certain styles in mind, for example the Kookaburra Big Kahuna, is designed for strong, ‘big hitters’. Whereas the Kookaburra Kahuna Ricky Ponting cricket bat is an excellent choice for a stroke player who likes to hit boundaries.

It is very important when buying a new cricket bat to choose the correct size bat. As a bat that is too large or too small will only hinder your playing ability. I’ve found the best way to determine if a bat is of the right size, is to stand in your batting stance and rest the toe of the bat against the outside of your back foot, lean the cricket bat so that the top of the handle rests next to the inside groin of your front leg. If the bat is of the right size it should rest comfortably next to your box on the inside groin of your front leg.

The weight of a cricket bat is probably most important and you should choose a lighter bat where possible. A lot of players make the mistake of buying a bat which is too heavy and their performance suffers as a result, this is especially applicable to younger players who are often lulled into buying bats which are either to heavy or too big. As an adult I tend to choose a weight of around 2’ 8 – 2’ 10 oz, in a short handle (SH).

You should also take into account to grade and type of the willow of the cricket bat. Most bats are made from English Willow, which is a soft fibrous wood, with good striking qualities and is the best option. There is also Kashmir Willow, which is cheaper, harder and quite durable. It is often used in junior bats and produces less ball striking satisfaction. Always choose English Willow when given the option.

Cricket bat willow is graded on a scale from G1+ to G4. A willow grade of G1+ is the highest grade and is used by the top professionals, it is the best willow and is unbleached with straight even grains and no markings or discolouration. It’s more expensive but as always you get what you pay for!

Grade 4 (G4) willow is often non-oil and will usually have a covering on the face, such as an anti-scuff covering. It is the lowest grade of willow, which is represented in the price. If you have the money always opt for the highest grade willow you can afford.

You can now buy cricket bats online cheaper than you can offline, as online stores tend to have fewer costs associated with their businesses and so can offer cheaper prices and discounts. Also most offer guarantees on their bats so you can return it if the size or weight is not quite what you want. A sneaky tip; if you see a new bat you like go to your local store, check the size, weight, feel and pickup, then buy online, so you’ll get exactly what you want and save money in the process.

These are just a few ideas and tips I consider when buying a new cricket bat, most important are the bats size, weight and feel. Obviously the price is an important factor, but by buying online you can often save money.

Discover amazing cricket tips and tricks at www.cricketsecrets.com that you can use today to greatly improve your cricket results!

*Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway.

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Posted in Batting, buying a cricket bat, Cricket, cricket bat, english willow, kashmir willow, knocking in a bat, kookaburra | Leave a Comment »

Tips for Buying a New Cricket Bat

Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 24, 2008

When it comes to buying a new cricket bat there are a number of factors that you need to address before making your final decision to purchase a new cricket bat, such as:

– The brand,

– The size,

– The model,

– The weight,

…these are just a few factors to consider.

This article will look briefly at a few tips to follow when it comes to replacing your old favourite bat with a new cricket bat.

Choosing a cricket bat based on its brand really comes down to personally preference, as realistically there is not much major difference between brands. They all have cricket bats with similar attributes and features; it is the variation between models that I would pay closer attention too, not the brand name. However it is worth mentioning that some of the new Kookaburra cricket bat models are almost unique, as some are now reinforced with a new graphite matrix, giving “maximum power transfer and increased strength”.

When buying a new cricket bat, carefully select the model of cricket bat that most suitably fits your style of play. As some bats are designed specifically certain styles in mind, for example the Kookaburra Big Kahuna, is designed for strong, ‘big hitters’. Whereas the Kookaburra Kahuna Ricky Ponting cricket bat is an excellent choice for a stroke player who likes to hit boundaries.

It is very important when buying a new cricket bat to choose the correct size bat. As a bat that is too large or too small will only hinder your playing ability. I’ve found the best way to determine if a bat is of the right size, is to stand in your batting stance and rest the toe of the bat against the outside of your back foot, lean the cricket bat so that the top of the handle rests next to the inside groin of your front leg. If the bat is of the right size it should rest comfortably next to your box on the inside groin of your front leg.

The weight of a cricket bat is probably most important and you should choose a lighter bat where possible. A lot of players make the mistake of buying a bat which is too heavy and their performance suffers as a result, this is especially applicable to younger players who are often lulled into buying bats which are either to heavy or too big. As an adult I tend to choose a weight of around 2’ 8 – 2’ 10 oz, in a short handle (SH).

You should also take into account to grade and type of the willow of the cricket bat. Most bats are made from English Willow, which is a soft fibrous wood, with good striking qualities and is the best option. There is also Kashmir Willow, which is cheaper, harder and quite durable. It is often used in junior bats and produces less ball striking satisfaction. Always choose English Willow when given the option.

Cricket bat willow is graded on a scale from G1+ to G4. A willow grade of G1+ is the highest grade and is used by the top professionals, it is the best willow and is unbleached with straight even grains and no markings or discolouration. It’s more expensive but as always you get what you pay for!

Grade 4 (G4) willow is often non-oil and will usually have a covering on the face, such as an anti-scuff covering. It is the lowest grade of willow, which is represented in the price. If you have the money always opt for the highest grade willow you can afford.

You can now buy cricket bats online cheaper than you can offline, as online stores tend to have fewer costs associated with their businesses and so can offer cheaper prices and discounts. Also most offer guarantees on their bats so you can return it if the size or weight is not quite what you want. A sneaky tip; if you see a new bat you like go to your local store, check the size, weight, feel and pickup, then buy online, so you’ll get exactly what you want and save money in the process.

These are just a few ideas and tips I consider when buying a new cricket bat, most important are the bats size, weight and feel. Obviously the price is an important factor, but by buying online you can often save money.

Discover amazing cricket tips and tricks at www.cricketsecrets.com that you can use today to greatly improve your cricket results!

*Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway.

Posted in Batting, buying a cricket bat, Cricket, cricket bat, english willow, kashmir willow, knocking in a bat, kookaburra | Leave a Comment »

Cricket: The Greatest Sport On Earth?

Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 7, 2008

I’m sure you’ll agree with me that cricket is probably the greatest sport on Earth, well if you are a cricketer like me you will. The fact is for many people all around the world cricket is almost like a religion, every week fans and players go to training and watch matches, dedicated to the sport we cricketers all love.

Learning How To Play Cricket:
The problem with cricket is learning how to play cricket, importantly how to play cricket better than your opposition, and team mates, it’s a great feeling to be the best player on the team. Many people think they can learn how to play cricket just by going down to nets, batting and bowling for a bit, then playing at the weekends.

The problem with this is that unless you have a good coach or senior players to oversee you, you will pick up bad habits which you reinforce every time you practice. You end up practicing bad habits and trust me this is the last thing you want.

If you are serious about learning how to play cricket you need to do the following things to help ensure your cricket success:

  • Join a club with a good coaching system in place and that actively trains players to become coaches themselves, this ensures that there is a good coaching network within the club and so will help you progress and improve.
  • Take an active approach to improving your cricket, read books, watch video clips, or even better coaching videos of top players and learn from them. When you go to training, don’t just go through the motions, ask your coach or team mates to watch you play and pick out any faults and look to always make improvements.
  • If you have the money, pay your local pro or top coach to give you some one-on- one advice and guidance and find out where you need to be improving. If possible get someone to video you playing in a match or in the nets to help with this.

    Learning how to play cricket and improving yourself as a player is a great goal to have. However, giving tips on how to play cricket in terms of batting, bowling and fielding are beyond the scope of this article. But if you follow the tips above and take and active approach to improving your cricket you won’t go far wrong.

    Discover amazing cricket tips and tricks and learn how to play awesome cricket so that you can explode your cricket results and destroy your opposition!

    Visit, www.CricketSecrets.com right now to learn how to improve your cricket today!

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway

  • Posted in Cricket, cricketing secrets, how to bat, how to bowl, how to field, how to play cricket, improve your cricket | Leave a Comment »

    Cricket: The Greatest Sport On Earth?

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 7, 2008

    I’m sure you’ll agree with me that cricket is probably the greatest sport on Earth, well if you are a cricketer like me you will. The fact is for many people all around the world cricket is almost like a religion, every week fans and players go to training and watch matches, dedicated to the sport we cricketers all love.

    Learning How To Play Cricket:
    The problem with cricket is learning how to play cricket, importantly how to play cricket better than your opposition, and team mates, it’s a great feeling to be the best player on the team. Many people think they can learn how to play cricket just by going down to nets, batting and bowling for a bit, then playing at the weekends.

    The problem with this is that unless you have a good coach or senior players to oversee you, you will pick up bad habits which you reinforce every time you practice. You end up practicing bad habits and trust me this is the last thing you want.

    If you are serious about learning how to play cricket you need to do the following things to help ensure your cricket success:

  • Join a club with a good coaching system in place and that actively trains players to become coaches themselves, this ensures that there is a good coaching network within the club and so will help you progress and improve.
  • Take an active approach to improving your cricket, read books, watch video clips, or even better coaching videos of top players and learn from them. When you go to training, don’t just go through the motions, ask your coach or team mates to watch you play and pick out any faults and look to always make improvements.
  • If you have the money, pay your local pro or top coach to give you some one-on- one advice and guidance and find out where you need to be improving. If possible get someone to video you playing in a match or in the nets to help with this.

    Learning how to play cricket and improving yourself as a player is a great goal to have. However, giving tips on how to play cricket in terms of batting, bowling and fielding are beyond the scope of this article. But if you follow the tips above and take and active approach to improving your cricket you won’t go far wrong.

    Discover amazing cricket tips and tricks and learn how to play awesome cricket so that you can explode your cricket results and destroy your opposition!

    Visit, www.CricketSecrets.com right now to learn how to improve your cricket today!

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway

  • Posted in Cricket, cricketing secrets, how to bat, how to bowl, how to field, how to play cricket, improve your cricket | Leave a Comment »

    Life is like cricket, you sometimes score sixes or you get your off stump knocked over…

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 26, 2008

    Over the years as I developed my enthusiasm for the game of cricket I started to see some similarities to cricket as I see in life in general. For example, when you play cricket you win some and you lose some (games). One day you can be so happy its like you are whacking Muralitharan or Warney for 6’s, or you could be so down in the dumps that it feels like you are constantly getting bowled by a complete novice bowler. Or another analogy I’ve had thoughts of is like when you are happy you think of your home country thrashing the Aussies (for so long they have been dominant in world cricket) by more than an innings in a test and experiencing similar feelings to the elation the winning team would feel, or when you are sad its like if your team, for example, a known test nation like New Zealand, gets thrashed by more than an innings by perhaps a non test playing team such as Bermuda or even the USA.

    Confidence and self esteem is one of the many things that drives us forward and motivates us to succeed in what we pursue. It is also how we pick up ourselves from catastrophic lows and maintain ourselves at the heights of happiness that defines our character. When I relate this to cricket I see a team that has been bowled out well short of a follow-on and they take either two paths: No#1- Sit around and do nothing and dig yourself into an even deeper hole, or no#2- Seek help and advice and work with yourself to climb yourself out of a very precarious situation (and perhaps win despite being forced to “follow on”). You see some cricketing teams get bogged down in examples like this, some just get conprehensively walloped and some do make a miraculous comeback and win, despite being made to follow on. Also as in cricket, you use the help and guidance of people around you to help yourself “win” instead of “lose”. A cricket team is like a family or a group of closely-knit friends, they are there to help you through things and to perhaps improve yourself as a person, as you would do with your own cricketing techniques.

    I see cricket as a good way to improve your life. For example there is a cricket team from Compton in Los Angeles USA called The Homiez and The Popz(I have done a post earlier this year that talks a bit about them). A few years ago their team members were gang associates, habitual drug users, even thiefs and ones having numerous other criminal records. Thanks to cricket their lives have perhaps taken a turn for the better. They have even been to the home country of cricket (England) and are working on going to Australia to play some teams there. Cricket has taught them self respect, respect in others, patience, and it takes them away from the often violent worlds they came from. Ted Hayes is their manager and from the work he has done with the team he appears to be infusing the team members with the values, virtues and life skills the game of cricket embodies.

    It is from this little piece I have written that I see that cricket does indeed have a valuable place in society. It is up to us to enthusiastically embrace the game and maintain its values for other generations to come, so that cricket will maintain its unique place in history and remain a legacy.

    Posted in circle of life, Cricket, experience, follow on, friends, Homiez and Popz, life, life skills, love of cricket, team, values, virtues | 1 Comment »

    Life is like cricket, you sometimes score sixes or you get your off stump knocked over…

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 26, 2008

    Over the years as I developed my enthusiasm for the game of cricket I started to see some similarities to cricket as I see in life in general. For example, when you play cricket you win some and you lose some (games). One day you can be so happy its like you are whacking Muralitharan or Warney for 6’s, or you could be so down in the dumps that it feels like you are constantly getting bowled by a complete novice bowler. Or another analogy I’ve had thoughts of is like when you are happy you think of your home country thrashing the Aussies (for so long they have been dominant in world cricket) by more than an innings in a test and experiencing similar feelings to the elation the winning team would feel, or when you are sad its like if your team, for example, a known test nation like New Zealand, gets thrashed by more than an innings by perhaps a non test playing team such as Bermuda or even the USA.

    Confidence and self esteem is one of the many things that drives us forward and motivates us to succeed in what we pursue. It is also how we pick up ourselves from catastrophic lows and maintain ourselves at the heights of happiness that defines our character. When I relate this to cricket I see a team that has been bowled out well short of a follow-on and they take either two paths: No#1- Sit around and do nothing and dig yourself into an even deeper hole, or no#2- Seek help and advice and work with yourself to climb yourself out of a very precarious situation (and perhaps win despite being forced to “follow on”). You see some cricketing teams get bogged down in examples like this, some just get conprehensively walloped and some do make a miraculous comeback and win, despite being made to follow on. Also as in cricket, you use the help and guidance of people around you to help yourself “win” instead of “lose”. A cricket team is like a family or a group of closely-knit friends, they are there to help you through things and to perhaps improve yourself as a person, as you would do with your own cricketing techniques.

    I see cricket as a good way to improve your life. For example there is a cricket team from Compton in Los Angeles USA called The Homiez and The Popz(I have done a post earlier this year that talks a bit about them). A few years ago their team members were gang associates, habitual drug users, even thiefs and ones having numerous other criminal records. Thanks to cricket their lives have perhaps taken a turn for the better. They have even been to the home country of cricket (England) and are working on going to Australia to play some teams there. Cricket has taught them self respect, respect in others, patience, and it takes them away from the often violent worlds they came from. Ted Hayes is their manager and from the work he has done with the team he appears to be infusing the team members with the values, virtues and life skills the game of cricket embodies.

    It is from this little piece I have written that I see that cricket does indeed have a valuable place in society. It is up to us to enthusiastically embrace the game and maintain its values for other generations to come, so that cricket will maintain its unique place in history and remain a legacy.

    Posted in circle of life, Cricket, experience, follow on, friends, Homiez and Popz, life, life skills, love of cricket, team, values, virtues | 1 Comment »

    Should Cricket have been in the Olympics?

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on August 9, 2008

    Well the 2008 Beijing Olympics have finally arrived. As I am presently watching the opening ceremony and watching the masterful displays pieced to gether by meticulous choreography, I ponder to myself one question, one question that has made me write this post…Should cricket have been in the Olympics?

    I bet there are many cricket lovers that are wondering the same thing. Is it because China isn’t a leading cricket nation? It shouldn’t really matter if China is or not. Cricket is fast gaining interest in this hugely populated country and because of its huge population there is a huge market for cricket in the country.

    Perhaps the Twenty20 would have been a crowd favourite at the Olympics, as a Twenty20 game lasts around 3 to 4 hours, and most crowds would be able to watch a game of cricket for this long. Baseball lasts about the same duration.

    Just imagine what if cricket was at the Beijing Olympics? It would’ve catapulted China furtherer up in the cricketing world and the sport itself would’ve got enormous amounts of exposure (as I have just heard on the commentary that there is approximately 4 billion people watching). Imagine that if cricket was in the Beijing Olympics there would be thousands and thousands of Chinese cricket teams sprouting up and forming a very stable foundation for the future of cricket in the country. Could you imagine that if cricket was in the olympics, it might have been a catalyst for, lets say an example, a major ODI/Twenty20 or a Super Test series being played beside the Yangtze River in the picturesque Gorges region? Or perhaps a super series involving all major cricketing nations including China in the modern metropolis of Beijing itself? The possibilities are endless and are only limited by the vastness of ones imagination, which are infinite.

    Of course many people would have their views on whether cricket should’ve been in the Beijing Olympics. Feel free to let your opinions be known by voting in my poll which asks the very question.

    Photobucket

    Posted in Asian Cricket Council, Beijing, Birds Nest, China, Cricket, Olympics, The Cube, Yangtze | 1 Comment »

    Should Cricket have been in the Olympics?

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on August 8, 2008

    Well the 2008 Beijing Olympics have finally arrived. As I am presently watching the opening ceremony and watching the masterful displays pieced to gether by meticulous choreography, I ponder to myself one question, one question that has made me write this post…Should cricket have been in the Olympics?

    I bet there are many cricket lovers that are wondering the same thing. Is it because China isn’t a leading cricket nation? It shouldn’t really matter if China is or not. Cricket is fast gaining interest in this hugely populated country and because of its huge population there is a huge market for cricket in the country.

    Perhaps the Twenty20 would have been a crowd favourite at the Olympics, as a Twenty20 game lasts around 3 to 4 hours, and most crowds would be able to watch a game of cricket for this long. Baseball lasts about the same duration.

    Just imagine what if cricket was at the Beijing Olympics? It would’ve catapulted China furtherer up in the cricketing world and the sport itself would’ve got enormous amounts of exposure (as I have just heard on the commentary that there is approximately 4 billion people watching). Imagine that if cricket was in the Beijing Olympics there would be thousands and thousands of Chinese cricket teams sprouting up and forming a very stable foundation for the future of cricket in the country. Could you imagine that if cricket was in the olympics, it might have been a catalyst for, lets say an example, a major ODI/Twenty20 or a Super Test series being played beside the Yangtze River in the picturesque Gorges region? Or perhaps a super series involving all major cricketing nations including China in the modern metropolis of Beijing itself? The possibilities are endless and are only limited by the vastness of ones imagination, which are infinite.

    Of course many people would have their views on whether cricket should’ve been in the Beijing Olympics. Feel free to let your opinions be known by voting in my poll which asks the very question.

    Photobucket

    Posted in Asian Cricket Council, Beijing, Birds Nest, China, Cricket, Olympics, The Cube, Yangtze | 1 Comment »

    George Bush "Playing" Cricket, What the F***!

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 9, 2008

    Heres a picture for you all showing that yes, the President of the United States of America can “play” cricket!

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to owner of picture.

    Posted in Cricket, George Bush, playing cricket, President of USA | Leave a Comment »

    George Bush "Playing" Cricket, What the F***!

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 8, 2008

    Heres a picture for you all showing that yes, the President of the United States of America can “play” cricket!

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to owner of picture.

    Posted in Cricket, George Bush, playing cricket, President of USA | Leave a Comment »