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Archive for the ‘Courtney Walsh’ Category

English County Cricket Clubs: Gloucestershire

Posted by wildkiwi25 on January 26, 2009

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Gloucestershire County Cricket Club is one of the 18 major county clubs which make up the English domestic cricket structure, representing the historic county of Gloucestershire. Its limited overs team is called the Gloucestershire Gladiators.

The club plays most of its home games at the County Cricket Ground, Bristol. Currently, each season a number of games are played at both the Cheltenham and Gloucester cricket festivals held at the College Ground, Cheltenham and The King’s School, Gloucester.

Records:

  • Team totals:
  • Highest Total For: 653-6 declared v Glamorgan at Bristol (Greenbank) 1928
  • Highest Total Against: 774-7 declared by the Australians at Bristol 1948
  • Lowest Total For: 17 v the Australians at Cheltenham (Spa) 1896
  • Lowest Total Against – 12 by Northamptonshire at Gloucester 1907

    Batting:
  • Highest Score: 341 Craig Spearman v Middlesex at Gloucester in 2004
  • Most Runs in Season: 2860 WR Hammond in 1933
  • Most Runs in Career: 33664 WR Hammond 1920-1951
  • Most Hundreds in Career – 113 WR Hammond 1920-1951

    Best Partnership for each wicket:

  • 1st: 395 DM Young & RB Nicholls v Oxford University at Oxford 1962
  • 2nd: 256 CTM Pugh & TW Graveney v Derbyshire at Chesterfield 1960
  • 3rd: 336 WR Hammond & BH Lyon v Leicestershire at Leicester (Aylestone Road) 1933
  • 4th: 321 WR Hammond & WL Neale v Leicestershire at Gloucester 1937
  • 5th: 261 WG Grace & WO Moberly v Yorkshire at Cheltenham 1876
  • 6th: 320 GL Jessop & JH Board v Sussex at Hove 1903
  • 7th – 248 WG Grace & EL Thomas v Sussex at Hove 1896
  • 8th – 239 WR Hammond & AE Wilson v Lancashire at Bristol 1938
  • 9th – 193 WG Grace & SAP Kitcat v Sussex at Bristol 1896
  • 10th – 131 WR Gouldsworthy & JGWT Bessant v Somerset at Bristol 1923

    Bowling:
  • Best Bowling: 10-40 EG Dennett v Essex at Bristol 1906
  • Best Match Bowling: 17-56 CWL Parker v Essex at Gloucester 1925
  • Wickets in Season: 222 TWJ Goddard in 1937 and 1947
  • Wickets in Career: 3170 CWL Parker 1903-1935

    Earliest cricket:
    Cricket probably reached Gloucestershire by the end of the 17th century. It is known that the related sport of “Stow-Ball” aka “Stob-Ball” was played in the county during the 16th century. In this game, the bat was called a “stave”. See Alice B Gomme : The Traditional Games of England, Scotland and Ireland.

    A game in Gloucester on 22 September 1729 is the earliest definite reference to cricket in the county. From then until the founding of the county club, very little has been found outside parish cricket.

    Origin of club:
    Records from 1863 have been found of an organisation in Cheltenham that is believed to have been the forerunner of Gloucestershire CCC, which had definitely been founded by 1871. Exact details of the club’s foundation have been lost.

    The club played its initial first-class match versus Surrey at Durdham Down near Bristol on 2, 3 & 4 June 1870. Gloucestershire joined the (unofficial) County Championship at this time.

    Club history:
    The early history of Gloucestershire is dominated by the Grace family, most notably W G Grace. WG’s father, Dr H M Grace, was involved with the formation of the club. It was a successful period with Gloucestershire winning three “Champion County” titles in the 1870s.

    Since then Gloucestershire’s fortunes have been mixed and they have never won the official County Championship. They struggled in the pre-war years of the County Championship because their best batsmen, apart from Gilbert Jessop and briefly Charlie Townsend, were very rarely available. The bowling, except when Townsend did sensational things on sticky wickets in late 1895 and late 1898, was very weak until George Dennett emerged – then it had the fault of depending far too much on him. Wally Hammond, who still holds many of the county’s batting records formed part of an occasionally strong inter-war team, although the highest championship finish during this period was second in 1930 and 1931, when Charlie Parker and Tom Goddard formed a devastating spin attack.

    Outstanding players since the war include Tom Graveney, “Jack” Russell and overseas players Mike Procter, Zaheer Abbas and Courtney Walsh.

    Gloucestershire enjoyed a run of success in one-day cricket in the late 1990s and early 2000s. They won several titles mainly under the captaincy of Mark Alleyne whilst being coached by John Bracewell.

    The club’s captain for the 2006 season, Jon Lewis, became the first Gloucestershire player for nearly 10 years to play for England at Test Match level, when he was picked to represent his country in the Third Test against Sri Lanka at Trent Bridge in June 2006. His figures in the first innings were 3-68, including a wicket in his very first over in Test cricket, and he was widely praised for his debut performance.

    Gloucestershire reached the final of the 2007 Twenty20 Cup, where they narrowly lost to Kent.

    Links to more information on the Gloucestershire County Cricket Club:

  • Gloucestershire County Cricket Club official website
  • Gloucestershire CCC on Cricinfo.com
  • Gloucestershire CCC on Bebo.com
  • Gloucestershire Cricket Lovers Society

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Cheltenham, Courtney Walsh, Craig Spearman, Gloucestershire, Gloucestershire Gladiators, John Bracewell, Mike Procter, WG Grace, Zaheer Abbas | 1 Comment »

    In the International Spotlight…Cuba Cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on January 22, 2009

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    The origins of the Cuban cricket team began when baseball was introduced into Cuba in the 1860s by Cubans who studied in the United States, American sailors who ported in the country and American settlers during the 19th century; at the same time, at the end of the 19th century, economic immigrants of the Caribbean countries landed in Cuba, brought this sport to the eastern part of the island. In the 1920s, an influx of sugar workers from Jamaica and Barbados brought cricket with them to the plantations on the east of Cuba. Their teams played in leagues and cup competitions in Santiago de Cuba, Guantánamo and Baraguá.

    Cuba’s first international match in 1952, against a Jamaican team, included Jamaica’s current Governor-General, Howard Cooke.

    By the late 1990s cricket had spread to Havana, where there are more than 500 players. More than 2,000 juniors and adults play cricket today, with it being taught in some schools. More than 20 teams recently took part in a national under-15 tournament.

    Today there is pressure to expand cricket in Cuba with the government stating that it wants to be more closely aligned with other Caribbean countries. In 2002 Cuba became an affiliate member of the International Cricket Council.

    The president of the Cuban Cricket Commission is Leona Ford. After hearing of a speech she had given, Cooke persuaded Courtney Walsh to become involved and raise equipment for Cuban teams. Donations have also come from South Africa, India, Sri Lanka, Guyana, Canada, India and Britain. Former Indian One-day all rounder Robin Singh travelled to Cuba in 2007 forming a coaching team to train young players.

    Links to more information on Cuba Cricket:

  • Havana Cricket Club
  • Cuba’s Cricket Uprising
  • Cuba, land of rum, cigars, salsa and CRICKET!

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    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Baragua, Caribbean, Courtney Walsh, Cricket in Cuba, Cuba Cricket, Fidel Castro, Guantanamo, Havana Cricket Club, Robin Singh, Santiago de Cuba | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(no#6)…Shoaib Akhtar(Pakistan)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on February 20, 2008

    This is how lethal Shoaib Akhtar can be....

    shoaib akhtar's hurtling run-up

    shoaib akhtar bowls jamie dalrymple

    There have been many highly regarded pace bowlers in the game of cricket that can bowl at blindingly fast pace with devastating consequences for any batsman that makes a miss-shot or attempts a shot but is deceived by the lightning pace of the express pace bowlers. Pakistan is one cricketing country (also including countries like the West Indies, Australia, England etc that have produced bowlers of the highest calibre and pace such as Malcolm Marshall, Jeff Thompson, John Snow, Courtney Walsh, Brett Lee and co) that has produced express pacemen such as Wasim Akram, Waqar Younis and the player that this profile is about- Shoaib Akhtar.

    The “Rawalpindi Express” as he is known by is widely regarded as the fastest bowler ever in cricket, having twice bowled over the 100mph mark (one of these deliveries was against Nick Knight of England in a match in the 2003 Cricket World Cup in South Africa). Even on the most dead of pitches he was just as lethal as ever, being able to deceive opposition batsman with his vast bowling weaponry that include fast Yorkers, well disguised slower balls, swinging deliveries and sharp bouncers.

    However as brilliant as his bowling skills he was perhaps overcome by stardom (and later on an overinflated ego) when he played in the 1999 Cricket World Cup in the U.K. He achieved a cult status in the cricketing world with his hurtling run-up, his flopping mop of hair, his “acting” skills in show-boating, and his vividly memorable nickname of the Rawalpindi Express (in reference to the area he was brought up in- a town called Morgah which is near Rawalpindi in the Punjab region of Pakistan). It was during the time where he achieved stardom and a cult status amongst cricket enthusiasts that contributed to the hype surrounding him, which ultimately led to his ego over-inflating. An ambition of creating history by being the first cricketer to break the holy grail of bowling- the 100mph barrier, which he did at the 2003 Cricket World Cup in South Africa) together with the overinflated ego fuelled by the hype and stardom he inherited were things that were said to matter to him more than being in the Pakistani team. His cricketing career has being filled with several incidences of controversy that have revolved around him, such as being banned from cricket in November 2006 for testing positive for the banned substance Nandrolone (which he was later aquitted of, with visible disgust from international drugs agencies), cricketing authorities sidelining him over queries to his bowling action (they perceived him to be a “chucker”- which is when you bowl illegally by bending the elbow more than 15 degrees instead of keeping the arm straight, as it’s meant to be) however he was also cleared of this when the University of Western Australia conducted studies on his action and came up with the revelation that he has hyper-extendable joints in his bowling arm. He later brushed controversies aside and in 2002 he utilised his potent resources better when he blitzed Australia with bowling figures of 5 for 25 in a One-Dayer in Brisbane, and then also bowled an equally impressive spell in Colombo with figures of 5 for 21 which influenced Pakistan’s victory in the Test there. In the 2003 Cricket World Cup in South Africa however was very disappointing in comparison and was subsequently dropped after Pakistan’s disappointing showing at that World Cup. It appeared the selectors had faith in him when he toured with the team to New Zealand and regained his legendary form, but this was short-term as afterwards Pakistan went on a highly controversial and forgettable tour to India where not only he struggled for wickets but he left the field in the 3rd Test of the series supposedly with wrist injury and back pain and it appeared to be suspiciously controversial when neither of the “injuries” appeared to bother his batting ability. This incident sparked a period in which his career was in jeopardy. His commitment to the team was frequently debated and the relationship with then-captain Inzamam ul Haq and coach Bob Woolmer deteriorated and made problems alot worser.

    It was in One day that his career was perhaps told in a short summary; he returned against South Africa in Durban in 2006-07, having not been picked for the series initially, took 4 for 36 in 11 overs, set up a Test win, strained a hamstring, argued with the late coach Bob Woolmer, and returned to Pakistan. He was in Pakistan’s squad for the 2007 World Cup, but pulled out at the last minute with an injury, though many suggested it was actually because of fears that traces of Nandrolone remained in his system, which might crop up in a dope test during the tournament. It turned out, in hindsight, to be a good tournament to miss.
    Shoaib was not picked to represent Pakistan in the Abu Dhabi series against Sri Lanka and was dropped from the Asian squad for the Afro-Asia Cup after being initially selected. He, however, was named in Pakistan’s squad for a brief tour of Scotland as well as the squad for the inaugural ICC World Twenty20. However, a dressing room bust-up with fellow paceman Mohammad Asif resulted in Shoaib being sent back home before the tournament even started.

    Here are some links to other articles and items which relate to the speedster:

  • PCB bans Shoaib Akhtar for an indefinite period
  • Bone scan puts Akhtar in the clear (2004)
  • ABC Sport – Cricket – Pakistan’s Akhtar fined for Australian disco jaunt
  • Shoaib slapped coach Woolmer over i-Pod song- Indiatimes Cricket
  • Cricinfo – Asif and Akhtar to return home
  • ^ Shoaib never co-operated for dope tests: Shaharyar – News – News – Indiatimes Cricket
  • BBC SPORT | Cricket | Shocked Shoaib protests innocence
  • Cricinfo – Sad but we had to make an example of Shoaib – Alam
  • Pakistan Cricket Board – official website
  • Cricinfo – Shoaib and Asif banned for drugs use
  • Cricinfo – Shoaib and Asif acquitted
  • Shoaib and Asif out of the World Cup
  • Court cannot rule on Pakistan duo
  • Shoaib uses foul language to protest PCB decision
  • Shoaib hits Asif with bat, thrown out of team
  • Asif injured in dressing room spat by Akhtar
  • Pakistan recalls Shoaib after Twenty20 World Cup bust up
  • Shoaib to be sent home after incident
  • Cricket-Pakistan’s Akhtar accuses Afridi of instigating spat | Sports | Cricket | Reuters
  • Shoaib is not speaking the truth: Asif
    Shoaib Akhtar

    Shoaib Akhtar gets a wicket

    *Acknowledgements to Cricinfo.com and the staff, Wikipedia.com

  • Posted in 100mph, Brett Lee, Courtney Walsh, Jeff Thompson, John Snow, Malcolm Marshall, Morgah, Nick Knight, Pakistan, Punjab, Rawalpindi, Rawalpindi Express, Shoaib Akhtar, Waqar Younis, Wasim Akram | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(no#6)…Shoaib Akhtar(Pakistan)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on February 19, 2008

    Player Profile(#6)…Shoaib Akhtar(Pakistan):

    This is how lethal Shoaib Akhtar can be....

    shoaib akhtar's hurtling run-up

    shoaib akhtar bowls jamie dalrymple

    There have been many highly regarded pace bowlers in the game of cricket that can bowl at blindingly fast pace with devastating consequences for any batsman that makes a miss-shot or attempts a shot but is deceived by the lightning pace of the express pace bowlers. Pakistan is one cricketing country (also including countries like the West Indies, Australia, England etc that have produced bowlers of the highest calibre and pace such as Malcolm Marshall, Jeff Thompson, John Snow, Courtney Walsh, Brett Lee and co) that has produced express pacemen such as Wasim Akram, Waqar Younis and the player that this profile is about- Shoaib Akhtar.

    The “Rawalpindi Express” as he is known by is widely regarded as the fastest bowler ever in cricket, having twice bowled over the 100mph mark (one of these deliveries was against Nick Knight of England in a match in the 2003 Cricket World Cup in South Africa). Even on the most dead of pitches he was just as lethal as ever, being able to deceive opposition batsman with his vast bowling weaponry that include fast Yorkers, well disguised slower balls, swinging deliveries and sharp bouncers.

    However as brilliant as his bowling skills he was perhaps overcome by stardom (and later on an overinflated ego) when he played in the 1999 Cricket World Cup in the U.K. He achieved a cult status in the cricketing world with his hurtling run-up, his flopping mop of hair, his “acting” skills in show-boating, and his vividly memorable nickname of the Rawalpindi Express (in reference to the area he was brought up in- a town called Morgah which is near Rawalpindi in the Punjab region of Pakistan). It was during the time where he achieved stardom and a cult status amongst cricket enthusiasts that contributed to the hype surrounding him, which ultimately led to his ego over-inflating. An ambition of creating history by being the first cricketer to break the holy grail of bowling- the 100mph barrier, which he did at the 2003 Cricket World Cup in South Africa) together with the overinflated ego fuelled by the hype and stardom he inherited were things that were said to matter to him more than being in the Pakistani team. His cricketing career has being filled with several incidences of controversy that have revolved around him, such as being banned from cricket in November 2006 for testing positive for the banned substance Nandrolone (which he was later aquitted of, with visible disgust from international drugs agencies), cricketing authorities sidelining him over queries to his bowling action (they perceived him to be a “chucker”- which is when you bowl illegally by bending the elbow more than 15 degrees instead of keeping the arm straight, as it’s meant to be) however he was also cleared of this when the University of Western Australia conducted studies on his action and came up with the revelation that he has hyper-extendable joints in his bowling arm. He later brushed controversies aside and in 2002 he utilised his potent resources better when he blitzed Australia with bowling figures of 5 for 25 in a One-Dayer in Brisbane, and then also bowled an equally impressive spell in Colombo with figures of 5 for 21 which influenced Pakistan’s victory in the Test there. In the 2003 Cricket World Cup in South Africa however was very disappointing in comparison and was subsequently dropped after Pakistan’s disappointing showing at that World Cup. It appeared the selectors had faith in him when he toured with the team to New Zealand and regained his legendary form, but this was short-term as afterwards Pakistan went on a highly controversial and forgettable tour to India where not only he struggled for wickets but he left the field in the 3rd Test of the series supposedly with wrist injury and back pain and it appeared to be suspiciously controversial when neither of the “injuries” appeared to bother his batting ability. This incident sparked a period in which his career was in jeopardy. His commitment to the team was frequently debated and the relationship with then-captain Inzamam ul Haq and coach Bob Woolmer deteriorated and made problems alot worser.

    It was in One day that his career was perhaps told in a short summary; he returned against South Africa in Durban in 2006-07, having not been picked for the series initially, took 4 for 36 in 11 overs, set up a Test win, strained a hamstring, argued with the late coach Bob Woolmer, and returned to Pakistan. He was in Pakistan’s squad for the 2007 World Cup, but pulled out at the last minute with an injury, though many suggested it was actually because of fears that traces of Nandrolone remained in his system, which might crop up in a dope test during the tournament. It turned out, in hindsight, to be a good tournament to miss.
    Shoaib was not picked to represent Pakistan in the Abu Dhabi series against Sri Lanka and was dropped from the Asian squad for the Afro-Asia Cup after being initially selected. He, however, was named in Pakistan’s squad for a brief tour of Scotland as well as the squad for the inaugural ICC World Twenty20. However, a dressing room bust-up with fellow paceman Mohammad Asif resulted in Shoaib being sent back home before the tournament even started.

    Here are some links to other articles and items which relate to the speedster:

    1. ^PCB bans Shoaib Akhtar for an indefinite period“. 
    2. ^ Bone scan puts Akhtar in the clear (2004). Retrieved on 200604-10.
    3. ^ Vaughan – Batsmen to blame (2004). Retrieved on 200604-10.
    4. ^ Steve Pittard and John Stern (200705-24). Dodgy overseas signings. Cricinfo. Retrieved on 200705-24.
    5. ^ ABC Sport – Cricket – Pakistan’s Akhtar fined for Australian disco jaunt
    6. ^ Shoaib slapped coach Woolmer over i-Pod song – News – News – Indiatimes Cricket
    7. ^ Cricinfo – Asif and Akhtar to return home
    8. ^ Staff writers and wires. “Shoaib returns positive test“, FOX SPORTS Australia, 200610-16. 
    9. ^ Shoaib never co-operated for dope tests: Shaharyar – News – News – Indiatimes Cricket
    10. ^ Pakistan News Service – PakTribune
    11. ^ Pakistan News Service – PakTribune
    12. ^ BBC SPORT | Cricket | Shocked Shoaib protests innocence
    13. ^ Cricinfo – Sad but we had to make an example of Shoaib – Alam
    14. ^ Pakistan Cricket Board – official website
    15. ^ Cricinfo – Shoaib and Asif banned for drugs use
    16. ^ http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3847919a10133,00.html
    17. ^ Cricinfo – Shoaib and Asif acquitted
    18. ^ Cricinfo – Shoaib and Asif acquitted
    19. ^ Cricinfo – Dope on the doping scandal
    20. ^ Shoaib and Asif out of the World Cup:
    21. ^ Court has no jurisdiction in doping case. Cricinfo.com. Retrieved on 200707-03.
    22. ^ Court cannot rule on Pakistan duo. Cricinfo.com. Retrieved on 200707-03.
    23. ^Shoaib uses foul language to protest PCB decision“. 
    24. ^ Shoaib hits Asif with bat, thrown out of team September 8, 2007The Indian Express
    25. ^Asif injured in dressing room spat by Akhtar“. 
    26. ^ Pakistan recalls Shoaib after Twenty20 World Cup bust up September 7, 2007 Reuters
    27. ^ Shoaib to be sent home after incident
    28. ^ [http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2007%5C09%5C08%5Cstory_8-9-2007_pg1_8 Shoaib banned for five matches] September 8, 2007 Daily Times
    29. ^ Cricket-Pakistan’s Akhtar accuses Afridi of instigating spat | Sports | Cricket | Reuters
    30. ^ Cricket-Pakistan’s Akhtar accuses Afridi of instigating spat | Sports | Cricket | Reuters
    31. ^ http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/007200709102240.htm Shoaib is not speaking the truth: Asif]

    Shoaib Akhtar

    Shoaib Akhtar gets a wicket

    *Acknowledgements to Cricinfo.com and the staff, Wikipedia.com

    Posted in 100mph, Brett Lee, Courtney Walsh, Jeff Thompson, John Snow, Malcolm Marshall, Morgah, Nick Knight, Pakistan, Punjab, Rawalpindi, Rawalpindi Express, Shoaib Akhtar, Waqar Younis, Wasim Akram | Leave a Comment »