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Player Profile(#45)…Matthew Hayden (Australia)

Posted by wildkiwi25 on January 10, 2009

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Matthew Lawrence Hayden (born 29 October 1971) is an Australian cricketer. He was born in Kingaroy, Queensland to Laurence and Moya Hayden. He was educated at Marist College in Ashgrove and he is an Australian and Queensland representative cricketer.

Hayden (nicknames: Haydos, Unit) is a powerful and aggressive left hand opening batsman, known for his ability to score quickly at both Test and one day levels. He is particularly proficient when hitting down the ground. Hayden currently holds the record for the highest scores made by an Australian batsman in both the Test (380) and One Day International (181 not out) arenas. He formed one of the most prolific opening partnerships in world Test cricket for Australia with Justin Langer, and in ODI cricket with Adam Gilchrist. He is currently partnered with Simon Katich as an opener in the Australian Test team.

Test career:

Hayden debuted for the Australian team in the 1994 March 4-8 Test Match against South Africa in Johannesburg, scoring 15 and 5. His next Test selection was in the 1996/7 season, with three each against the West Indies and South Africa. He made his debut century (125 against WI in Adelaide) aided by multiple dropped catches by the West Indies side. His average of 21.7 was not enough to keep his position in the Australian side, and in particular openers Mark Taylor and Matthew Elliott. He was dropped from the team, and it appeared his international career was over, compared occasionally to that of Graeme Hick, a fine domestic performer with not quite enough to make it at the highest level.

During these years Hayden was a prolific batsman for the Queensland first-class cricket team. Weight of domestic cricket runs and persistence resulted in a resurrection of his international career for the 1999-00 tour of New Zealand. In the subsequent 2000-01 tour of India he averaged a Bradmanesque 109.80 with 549 runs, an Australian record for a three-Test series. Since then, he has been an automatic selection for the Test side. In the 2007-08 series against India, Hayden scored three centuries, raising his tally of centuries against India to five. He currently has thirty test centuries to his name, the first left-handed opening batsman to achieve this feat.

In 2001, Hayden scored a then-Australian record of 1,391 runs in Test matches in one calendar year, and subsequently won the Allan Border Medal as the best Australian player of the year. He picked up where he left off the following season with a seven-hour 119 against Pakistan in the Sharjah heat, which approached 50 degrees celsius.

He scored over 1,000 Test runs in 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 & 2005, the first man to achieve the feat five times. He was selected as one of Wisden’s five 2003 Cricketers of the Year and briefly held the world record for the highest Test score, 380, which he reached at the WACA against Zimbabwe on 10 October 2003, having batted only five sessions. As of July 2008, Hayden had the third highest conversion-rate in history, with a Test century every 3.13 Tests played, behind only Don Bradman at 1.79, and Clyde Walcott at 2.93.

Despite these achievements, Hayden has received criticism from some quarters for being a “flat-track bully”. Critics have contrasted his ability to score big runs on ideal batting pitches against weak attacks, with how he was troubled during the 2005 Ashes by the less batsman-friendly English conditions. Against a high-quality swing and pace attack, the “fantastic foursome” of Steve Harmison, Matthew Hoggard, Andrew Flintoff and Simon Jones, he averaged a meagre 35.33 across the five-match series. With his Test spot under pressure going into the Fifth Test at the Oval, Hayden rescued his career with a hard-fought 138 from 303 balls. His 21st Test century signalled a return to form for Hayden for the the Australian season of 2007/08, scoring three centuries in three consecutive Tests against the ICC World XI and West Indies. Hayden scored one century during the Boxing Day Test against South Africa, and another in the away series in South Africa played in March 2006.

Hayden played in the highly-anticipated 2006-07 Ashes series, against England. He failed to reach 40 in the first three innings of the series, but again returned to form with scores of 92 in Perth, and 153 in the Boxing Day Test. The century at Melbourne continued Hayden’s rich vein of form at the MCG, being his fifth in eight Tests there.

Hayden’s defenders point out that he was not alone in finding England tough-going in 2005, as even Australia’s captain and talisman Ricky Ponting averaged under forty, while other big names such as Adam Gilchrist and Damien Martyn failed to impress with averages near twenty.

Hayden has also been a regular and successful slip fielder for Australia, and has taken the thirteenth-most catches by a non-wicketkeeper in Test history. He also shares the record for the most catches by a non-wicketkeeper in a single Test Match, with seven against Sri Lanka in 2004. His most notable fielding partnership was with Shane Warne, with the “caught Hayden, bowled Warne” dismissal being the equal third most common partnership for a non-wicketkeeper and bowler: their 39 wickets are behind only “caught Taylor, bowled Warne” and “caught Dravid, bowled Kumble”.

Hayden’s most notable opening batting partner was Justin Langer. The opening pair represented Australia in more than 100 Test innings. The pair made 5654 runs while batting together in partnerships, with an average of 51 runs per partnership; only Gordon Greenidge and Desmond Haynes of the West Indies have scored more Test runs as a partnership, with 6482.

ODI:
Hayden also played in the Australian side that won the 2003 One Day International Cricket World Cup. He was dropped from the ODI squad because of poor form after The Ashes in 2005, though he could not be kept away from the ODI squad for long. He returned to the Australian squad in the 2006-07 Australian season after Simon Katich fell out of favour and Shane Watson was injured. He dominated the Cricket World Cup in the West Indies as the tournament’s best batsman in 2007, scoring three centuries before the completion of the Super 8s section of the tournament.

On 20 February 2007, Matthew Hayden posted his highest ODI score (181 not out) against New Zealand at Seddon Park in Hamilton. Australia posted 346 for 5 wickets and New Zealand replied with 350 for 9 wickets and won the Chappel-Hadlee series 3-0.

Hayden hit another milestone against the Kiwis when he become only the third person (the others being Mark Waugh and Sourav Ganguly) to hit 3 centuries (101 vs RSA, 158 vs WI, 103 vs NZ) in a single World Cup tournament on 20 April 2007. The century against South Africa came off just 66 balls and is the fastest World Cup ton ever beating the previous record set by John Davison. The Prime Minister of St Kitts and Nevis awarded Hayden with honorary citizenship after the match.

Hayden also became only the second player in World Cup history to surpass 600 runs in a single tournament. He needed to score a further 52 runs to equal the record that was set by Sachin Tendulkar in the previous World Cup but fell short by 14 runs. He ended the tournament with 659 runs at an average of 73.22.

In September 2007, Hayden was named ODI Player of the Year after his dominating performance throughout the World Cup. An extraordinary performance considering his place in the Australian side was in jeopardy during the Australian VB Series against England and New Zealand. He officially holds the record for being the top runs scorer in the 2007 ICC World Twenty20, scoring 265 runs in the whole tournament.

Matthew Hayden played for the Chennai outfit Chennai Super Kings in the inaugural Indian Premier League (IPL) in April 2008. After a poor run of form in the Test arena during 2008, Hayden was dropped from the ODI and Twenty20 squad in January 2009. It still remains unclear as to whether his test career is continuing after so many recent failed test match innings.

England County:
Hayden has played in the English County Championship, first with Hampshire in 1997 and prominently as captain of Northamptonshire in 1999-2000.

Controversies:
He was a party to the controversy that emerged from the Second Test, 2007-08 Border-Gavaskar Trophy racism charges pressed by Australia against India, and was one of the witnesses for Andrew Symonds` charges against Harbhajan Singh.

As a fallout of that instance in February 2008, Hayden was charged for a code of conduct violation by Cricket Australia, for calling the Indian spinner Harbhajan Singh an obnoxious little weed, and for inviting Indian fast bowler Ishant Sharma for a fight, during an interview aired on Brisbane radio station; he was also heard to mimic Sharma`s Indian accent in this exchange.

He was reprimanded for his comment by Cricket Australia, but maintained his innocence.

He was strongly criticized by the BCCI and former Pakistan team captain Wasim Akram for reportedly calling India a third world country. Back home after a 2–0 series defeat by India, Hayden spoke about, what he perceived, poor ground conditions and inordinate delays during the matches “that happen in Third World countries”.

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Personal life:

  • In 2000, Hayden’s boat capsized whilst sailing near North Stradbroke Island; he and his two companions (one of whom was Queensland and Australian teammate Andrew Symonds) were forced to swim a kilometre to safety.
  • In his spare time, Hayden is a keen cook and occasionally prepares meals for his team-mates while on tour. A collection of his recipes was published in Australia in 2004 as The Matthew Hayden Cookbook. A second book, The Matthew Hayden Cookbook 2, was published in 2006.
  • Hayden uses a Gray-Nicolls bat with a fluorescent pink grip, to highlight and support research into a cure for breast cancer. This is at least in part inspired by his team-mate Glenn McGrath’s wife struggle with this illness.
  • He is married to Kellie Hayden (née Culey), and they have a daughter named Grace (born June 2002), and two sons named Joshua (born 15 April 2005) and Thomas Joseph (born May 2007).
  • Hayden is a devout Roman Catholic and says “When I’m in trouble, I ask: ‘What would Christ do?'”
  • He is patron of Parent Project Australia, a charity fighting for a cure for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
  • Matthew Hayden is an Ambassador for World Youth Day 2008.

    Links to more information on Matthew Hayden:
  • Cricinfo.com profile on Matthew Hayden
  • Matthew Hayden on Qldcricket.com.au
  • Matthew Hayden Wallpapers

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    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

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    Posted in Allan Border Medal, Australia, Chennai Super Kings, Hampshire, Haydos, Kellie Hayden, Matthew Hayden, Northamptonshire, Parent Project Australia, queensland, Queensland Bulls, Roman Catholic, Unit | Leave a Comment »

    The Complete List of Test and O.D.I Cricketers

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 12, 2008

    Here is a list of links that take you to a page showing every cricketer that has played test cricket for their country. This might help with cricket related trivia so be sure to bookmark this site :).

    Test Cricket:

  • New Zealand Test Cricketers
  • List of Australian Test Cricketers
  • List of England Test Cricketers
  • List of West Indies Test Cricketers
  • List of Pakistan Test Cricketers
  • List of South Africa Test Cricketers
  • List of India Test Cricketers
  • List of Sri Lanka Test Cricricketers
  • List of Bangladesh Test Cricketers
  • List of Zimbabwe Test Cricketers

    O.D.I Cricket:
  • List of Australia ODI Cricketers
  • List of Bangladesh ODI Cricketers
  • List of Bermuda ODI Cricketers
  • List of Canada ODI Cricketers
  • List of England ODI Cricketers
  • List of Hong Kong ODI Cricketers
  • List of India ODI Cricketers
  • List of Ireland ODI Cricketers
  • List of Kenya ODI Cricketers
  • List of Namibia ODI Cricketers
  • List of Netherlands ODI Cricketers
  • List of New Zealand ODI Cricketers
  • List of Pakistan ODI Cricketers
  • List of Scotland ODI Cricketers
  • List of South Africa ODI Cricketers
  • List of Sri Lanka ODI Cricketers
  • List of U.A.E ODI Cricketers
  • List of U.S.A ODI Cricketers
  • List of West Indies ODI Cricketers
  • List of Zimbabwe ODI Cricketers

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Australia, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Canada, England, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Kenya, Namibia, Netherlands, new zealand, ODI, Pakistan, scotland, South Africa, Sri Lanka, USA, West Indies, Zimbabwe | Leave a Comment »

    The XXXX Gold Beach Cricket Tri-Nations series

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 12, 2008

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    The XXXX Gold Beach Cricket Tri-Nations series is a four-round beach cricket competition created and sponsored by Australian beer brand XXXX. It was launched on September 27, 2006, and the event coincided with the 2006-07 Ashes series being played in Australia with the first series being played in January 2007.

    The first series involved cricketing legends from Australia, England and the West Indies. It was won by England, who beat Australia in the Grand Final on 4 February 2007. Due to the popularity to the initial series, a new 2008 series was held with teams from Australia, England and New Zealand competing.

    2008 saw an additional venue – Glenelg Beach in Adelaide included in the schedule alongside the existing locations of Maroubra Beach in Sydney, Scarborough Beach in Perth and Coolangatta Beach on the Gold Coast.

    Network Ten is the host broadcaster of the matches.

    The Rules:
    The series incorporated rules that are a hybrid of the regular game and that of indoor cricket. As with the regular game boundaries score 6 runs if hit over the perimeter, and 4 if the ball hits the ground before passing or touching the perimeter.

    There are eight overs in an innings, with the final two overs declared “Captain’s Choice” in which each side’s captain is allowed to field the batsmen and bowlers of their own choosing. For the first six overs batsmen and bowlers are swapped out every two overs.

    When a batsman is dismissed, he keeps batting — however, he loses runs. A score is decreased by 5 runs when the batsman has been dismissed by two-handed catch, and by 7 runs with a one-handed catch. It is possible to score into negative numbers.

    A batsman cannot be dismissed LBW if he plays a shot.

    The series uses a plastic drop-in pitch to allow the ball to bounce, and batting and bowling only take place facing one direction. The Coolangatta arena initially featured an open boundary along the surf, allowing fielding to be possible in the water, however this was later removed due to crowd control concerns.

    Venues:

    The 2007 series venues and dates were:

  • Round One — Coolangatta, Gold Coast, Queensland — January 19-20
  • Round Two — Scarborough, Perth, Western Australia — January 26-27
  • Round Three — Maroubra, Sydney, New South Wales — February 3
  • Grand Final — Maroubra, Sydney, New South Wales — February 4

    The 2008 series venues and dates were:

  • Round One — Scarborough, Perth, Western Australia — January 5-6
  • Round Two — Glenelg Beach, Adelaide, South Australia — January 9
  • Round Three — Maroubra, Sydney, New South Wales — January 12-13
  • Round Four/Grand Final — Coolangatta, Gold Coast, Queensland — January 19-20

    Teams:

    2007:

  • Australia: Allan Border (captain), Jeff Thomson, Kim Hughes, Dean Jones, Dennis Lillee, Damien Fleming and Mark Waugh.
  • England: Graham Gooch (captain), Darren Gough, Allan Lamb, Robin Smith, Adam Hollioake, Graeme Hick and Gladstone Small (replacing Mark Ramprakash).
  • West Indies: Courtney Walsh (captain), Phil Simmons, Jimmy Adams, Curtly Ambrose, Richie Richardson, Desmond Haynes, Joel Garner and Sir Viv Richards (new addition).

    The umpire for all matches was Dickie Bird.

    2008:

  • Australia: Allan Border (captain), Jeff Thomson, Dean Jones, Dennis Lillee, Mark Waugh, Damien Fleming, Michael Bevan, Stuart Law and Darren Lehmann.
  • England: Graham Gooch (captain), Robin Smith, Adam Hollioake, Graeme Hick, Gladstone Small, Phil Defreitas, Angus Fraser and John Emburey.
  • New Zealand: Martin Crowe (captain), Sir Richard Hadlee, Mark Greatbatch, Danny Morrison, Nathan Astle, Dion Nash, Dipak Patel and Chris Cairns.

    The umpire for all matches was Clive Crookshanks.

    Records:

    Team:

  • Highest winning score — England 1/153 vs Australia at Scarborough, 2008(round 1)
  • Highest losing score — Australia 0/126 vs England at Scarborough, 2008(round 1)
  • Lowest winning score — West Indies vs England ?/41 at Coolangatta, 2007(round 1)
  • Lowest losing score — England vs New Zealand 9/27 at Maroubra, 2008(round 3)

    Individual:

  • Most runs (innings) — Graeme Hick 81(57+24*) vs Australia at Scarborough, 2008(round 1)
  • Most runs (over) — Graham Gooch 36 (6 6 6 6 6 6) vs New Zealand at Coolangatta, 2008(round 4)

    * = batted twice(captains choice)

    Trophies:

    Round Robin competition:

  • The winner’s trophy is a beer glass — the runners-up trophy is a can of XXXX Gold beer.

    Finals:
  • The winner was presented with a beer glass mounted on a wooden stand.

    Entertainment:
    Throughout the matches the players were miked up so both fans at the game and at home watching the televised match can hear the players talking. Also music was played throughout the day whilst the matches were being played.

    When the players were fielding around the boundary, they were taking time out to sign autographs for fans situated around the boundary.

    In between the matches there was performances on field, by the female cheerleading squad XXXX Angels. Also XXXX promotional staff were handing out giveaways including XXXX Gold bucket hats, beach cricket balls and other promo items.

    Links and references to the XXX Gold Beach Cricket series:

  • Test stars’ spin on beach cricket
  • XXXX Gold scores big with beach cricket
  • Beer war loses its bubbles | The Courier-Mail
  • Crikey – Beach cricket – a turf war between two breweries
  • XXXX Gold Beach Cricket Tri-Nations series
  • XXXX Angels cheerleading squad

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Adelaide, Australia, Coolangatta, England, Glenelg, Gold Coast, Maroubra, new zealand, Perth, Scarborough, Sexy cheerleaders, Sydney, XXXX, XXXX Angels Cheerleading Squad, XXXX gold beach cricket | Leave a Comment »

    The Complete List of Test and O.D.I Cricketers

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 12, 2008

    Here is a list of links that take you to a page showing every cricketer that has played test cricket for their country. This might help with cricket related trivia so be sure to bookmark this site :).

    Test Cricket:

  • New Zealand Test Cricketers
  • List of Australian Test Cricketers
  • List of England Test Cricketers
  • List of West Indies Test Cricketers
  • List of Pakistan Test Cricketers
  • List of South Africa Test Cricketers
  • List of India Test Cricketers
  • List of Sri Lanka Test Cricricketers
  • List of Bangladesh Test Cricketers
  • List of Zimbabwe Test Cricketers

    O.D.I Cricket:
  • List of Australia ODI Cricketers
  • List of Bangladesh ODI Cricketers
  • List of Bermuda ODI Cricketers
  • List of Canada ODI Cricketers
  • List of England ODI Cricketers
  • List of Hong Kong ODI Cricketers
  • List of India ODI Cricketers
  • List of Ireland ODI Cricketers
  • List of Kenya ODI Cricketers
  • List of Namibia ODI Cricketers
  • List of Netherlands ODI Cricketers
  • List of New Zealand ODI Cricketers
  • List of Pakistan ODI Cricketers
  • List of Scotland ODI Cricketers
  • List of South Africa ODI Cricketers
  • List of Sri Lanka ODI Cricketers
  • List of U.A.E ODI Cricketers
  • List of U.S.A ODI Cricketers
  • List of West Indies ODI Cricketers
  • List of Zimbabwe ODI Cricketers

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Australia, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Canada, England, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Kenya, Namibia, Netherlands, new zealand, ODI, Pakistan, scotland, South Africa, Sri Lanka, USA, West Indies, Zimbabwe | Leave a Comment »

    The XXXX Gold Beach Cricket Tri-Nations series

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 12, 2008

    Photobucket

    The XXXX Gold Beach Cricket Tri-Nations series is a four-round beach cricket competition created and sponsored by Australian beer brand XXXX. It was launched on September 27, 2006, and the event coincided with the 2006-07 Ashes series being played in Australia with the first series being played in January 2007.

    The first series involved cricketing legends from Australia, England and the West Indies. It was won by England, who beat Australia in the Grand Final on 4 February 2007. Due to the popularity to the initial series, a new 2008 series was held with teams from Australia, England and New Zealand competing.

    2008 saw an additional venue – Glenelg Beach in Adelaide included in the schedule alongside the existing locations of Maroubra Beach in Sydney, Scarborough Beach in Perth and Coolangatta Beach on the Gold Coast.

    Network Ten is the host broadcaster of the matches.

    The Rules:
    The series incorporated rules that are a hybrid of the regular game and that of indoor cricket. As with the regular game boundaries score 6 runs if hit over the perimeter, and 4 if the ball hits the ground before passing or touching the perimeter.

    There are eight overs in an innings, with the final two overs declared “Captain’s Choice” in which each side’s captain is allowed to field the batsmen and bowlers of their own choosing. For the first six overs batsmen and bowlers are swapped out every two overs.

    When a batsman is dismissed, he keeps batting — however, he loses runs. A score is decreased by 5 runs when the batsman has been dismissed by two-handed catch, and by 7 runs with a one-handed catch. It is possible to score into negative numbers.

    A batsman cannot be dismissed LBW if he plays a shot.

    The series uses a plastic drop-in pitch to allow the ball to bounce, and batting and bowling only take place facing one direction. The Coolangatta arena initially featured an open boundary along the surf, allowing fielding to be possible in the water, however this was later removed due to crowd control concerns.

    Venues:

    The 2007 series venues and dates were:

  • Round One — Coolangatta, Gold Coast, Queensland — January 19-20
  • Round Two — Scarborough, Perth, Western Australia — January 26-27
  • Round Three — Maroubra, Sydney, New South Wales — February 3
  • Grand Final — Maroubra, Sydney, New South Wales — February 4

    The 2008 series venues and dates were:

  • Round One — Scarborough, Perth, Western Australia — January 5-6
  • Round Two — Glenelg Beach, Adelaide, South Australia — January 9
  • Round Three — Maroubra, Sydney, New South Wales — January 12-13
  • Round Four/Grand Final — Coolangatta, Gold Coast, Queensland — January 19-20

    Teams:

    2007:

  • Australia: Allan Border (captain), Jeff Thomson, Kim Hughes, Dean Jones, Dennis Lillee, Damien Fleming and Mark Waugh.
  • England: Graham Gooch (captain), Darren Gough, Allan Lamb, Robin Smith, Adam Hollioake, Graeme Hick and Gladstone Small (replacing Mark Ramprakash).
  • West Indies: Courtney Walsh (captain), Phil Simmons, Jimmy Adams, Curtly Ambrose, Richie Richardson, Desmond Haynes, Joel Garner and Sir Viv Richards (new addition).

    The umpire for all matches was Dickie Bird.

    2008:

  • Australia: Allan Border (captain), Jeff Thomson, Dean Jones, Dennis Lillee, Mark Waugh, Damien Fleming, Michael Bevan, Stuart Law and Darren Lehmann.
  • England: Graham Gooch (captain), Robin Smith, Adam Hollioake, Graeme Hick, Gladstone Small, Phil Defreitas, Angus Fraser and John Emburey.
  • New Zealand: Martin Crowe (captain), Sir Richard Hadlee, Mark Greatbatch, Danny Morrison, Nathan Astle, Dion Nash, Dipak Patel and Chris Cairns.

    The umpire for all matches was Clive Crookshanks.

    Records:

    Team:

  • Highest winning score — England 1/153 vs Australia at Scarborough, 2008(round 1)
  • Highest losing score — Australia 0/126 vs England at Scarborough, 2008(round 1)
  • Lowest winning score — West Indies vs England ?/41 at Coolangatta, 2007(round 1)
  • Lowest losing score — England vs New Zealand 9/27 at Maroubra, 2008(round 3)

    Individual:

  • Most runs (innings) — Graeme Hick 81(57+24*) vs Australia at Scarborough, 2008(round 1)
  • Most runs (over) — Graham Gooch 36 (6 6 6 6 6 6) vs New Zealand at Coolangatta, 2008(round 4)

    * = batted twice(captains choice)

    Trophies:

    Round Robin competition:

  • The winner’s trophy is a beer glass — the runners-up trophy is a can of XXXX Gold beer.

    Finals:
  • The winner was presented with a beer glass mounted on a wooden stand.

    Entertainment:
    Throughout the matches the players were miked up so both fans at the game and at home watching the televised match can hear the players talking. Also music was played throughout the day whilst the matches were being played.

    When the players were fielding around the boundary, they were taking time out to sign autographs for fans situated around the boundary.

    In between the matches there was performances on field, by the female cheerleading squad XXXX Angels. Also XXXX promotional staff were handing out giveaways including XXXX Gold bucket hats, beach cricket balls and other promo items.

    Links and references to the XXX Gold Beach Cricket series:

  • Test stars’ spin on beach cricket
  • XXXX Gold scores big with beach cricket
  • Beer war loses its bubbles | The Courier-Mail
  • Crikey – Beach cricket – a turf war between two breweries
  • XXXX Gold Beach Cricket Tri-Nations series
  • XXXX Angels cheerleading squad

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Adelaide, Australia, Coolangatta, England, Glenelg, Gold Coast, Maroubra, new zealand, Perth, Scarborough, Sexy cheerleaders, Sydney, XXXX, XXXX Angels Cheerleading Squad, XXXX gold beach cricket | Leave a Comment »

    Introducing… the Twenty20 Champions League

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 5, 2008

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    The Twenty20 Champions League is an international Twenty20 cricket competition between clubs from Australia, England, India, Pakistan and South Africa. The Twenty20 Champions League is chaired by Lalit Modi, who is the Chairman and Commissioner of the Indian Premier League and Vice-President of the BCCI. The competition is being launched in 2008 as a response to the success of national Twenty20 domestic cricket leagues, most notably the Indian Premier League. The first edition was set to take place from late September to early October 2008 in India, after the tournament organisers resolved various teething problems that had put the inaugural tournament under some doubt, but it was later announced that the tournament would be held from December 3 to December 10, 2008. The initial tournament was postponed again following terrorist attacks in Mumbai in November 2008. A rearranged date has not been announced.

    Background:
    Chennai vs Kolkata in the Indian Premier League. Chennai have qualified for the first edition of the T20 Champions League

    An international tournament for domestic cricket teams is believed to have been first mooted by Lalit Modi, vice-president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) in 1996, Lalit Modi is also the chairman and commissioner on the IPL. The launch and subsequent success of Twenty20 cricket some years later was the influence behind a serious effort to get such a tournament off the ground. Twenty20 cricket was launched by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) in 2003. Its launch was a result of a long-term decline in the popularity of county championship and domestic limited-overs cricket. By reducing the number of overs per innings to twenty and by placing a three hour limit on matches, the format was designed to attract a younger crowd and to boost attendances. Twenty20 proved a success, with an international version launched in 2005 and a World Twenty20 Competition held in September 2007. This proved much more popular than the 50 over Cricket World Cup had been just five months previously. The following year, the Indian Premier League (IPL) was launched, proving that there could be a market for a big-spending domestic Twenty20 cricket league. The success of Twenty20 and the IPL lead many commentators to suggest that other forms of cricket would suffer, with some worrying about the effect of the popular fast-paced ‘slogging’ game on players’ abilities in Test cricket.

    Immediately after the end of the first series of the IPL, the cricket authorities in England, India, Australia and South Africa entered into discussions to create a new international club competition, to capitalize on the this success. The new tournament’s £2.5m winning prize was described as “unprecedented” in cricket. A number of different formats for the tournament were considered, with original proposals containing a much lower prize fund. The T20 Champions League’s creation was announced on 7 June 2008, along with the announcement of planned restructuring of some of the domestic cricket tournaments involved, including the introduction of franchising in South Africa, England and Australia. Pakistan’s participation was always mooted, but not confirmed when the tournament was first launched. Following a series of discussions and the announcement of the creation of a Pakistan Super League from 2009, it was confirmed that two Pakistani teams would compete.

    Format:
    Qualifying:
    Although the 2008 tournament was originally rumoured to only include teams from Australia, South Africa, India and England, it was announced on 4 July 2008, that two teams from Pakistan’s domestic tournament were also invited. At the same, time England’s participation was also put into doubt, following differences between the ECB & BCCI over the inclusion of rebel Indian Cricket League (ICL) players. Eventually, it was arranged so that the 2008 Twenty20 Champions League is to be contested between 8 teams from 5 countries. The qualifiers are:

  • The winners and runners-up of the KFC Twenty20 Big Bash in Australia.
  • The winners and runners-up of the Standard Bank Pro 20 Series in South Africa and Zimbabwe.
  • The winners of the Twenty20 Cup in England and Wales. (Note: Runners-up Kent were not invited to participate in the inaugural tournament because it contained two players who have taken part in the rebel Indian Cricket League, a competition that is not recognized by the BCCI).
  • The winners and runners-up of the Indian Premier League in India.
  • The winners of the RBS Twenty-20 Cup from Pakistan, (Sialkot Stallions in 2007-08).

    This format is expected to change as 12 teams will compete in the 2nd edition of the tournament in September-October 2009.

    England’s Participation:
    The organisers of the tournament confirmed that any team competing would be banned from fielding players who have competed in the Indian Cricket League, a rival to the Indian Premier League. As a result of this, England’s participation in the tournament was put in jeopardy. For the the 2008 season, 15 of the 18 counties fielded 25 players from the ICL. On 24 July 2008, IPL commissioner Lalit Modi confirmed their stance by stating that only Middlesex and Essex stood a chance of being invited to the Champions League because they didn’t have ICL links. Middlesex won the Twenty20 Cup and confirmed they had accepted the invitation to participate in the tournament. Kent were officially barred from the competition on 1 August, and the ECB’s suggestion to replace them with Essex was rejected by Cricket Australia.

    Tournament:
    The Twenty20 Champions League will be played over an eight day period and will consist of two divisions competing in a round-robin format. The top two teams from each division will then move on to an elimination round to the finals.

    Links to more information on the Twenty20 Champions League:

  • Cricket Champions League unveiled
  • Everything you wanted to know about the Champions League
  • Champions League Twenty20 Moved To December

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Australia, B.C.C.I, ECB, England, India, Lalit Modi, Pakistan, South Africa, Twenty20 Champions League | Leave a Comment »

    Introducing… the Twenty20 Champions League

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 5, 2008

    Photobucket

    The Twenty20 Champions League is an international Twenty20 cricket competition between clubs from Australia, England, India, Pakistan and South Africa. The Twenty20 Champions League is chaired by Lalit Modi, who is the Chairman and Commissioner of the Indian Premier League and Vice-President of the BCCI. The competition is being launched in 2008 as a response to the success of national Twenty20 domestic cricket leagues, most notably the Indian Premier League. The first edition was set to take place from late September to early October 2008 in India, after the tournament organisers resolved various teething problems that had put the inaugural tournament under some doubt, but it was later announced that the tournament would be held from December 3 to December 10, 2008. The initial tournament was postponed again following terrorist attacks in Mumbai in November 2008. A rearranged date has not been announced.

    Background:
    Chennai vs Kolkata in the Indian Premier League. Chennai have qualified for the first edition of the T20 Champions League

    An international tournament for domestic cricket teams is believed to have been first mooted by Lalit Modi, vice-president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) in 1996, Lalit Modi is also the chairman and commissioner on the IPL. The launch and subsequent success of Twenty20 cricket some years later was the influence behind a serious effort to get such a tournament off the ground. Twenty20 cricket was launched by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) in 2003. Its launch was a result of a long-term decline in the popularity of county championship and domestic limited-overs cricket. By reducing the number of overs per innings to twenty and by placing a three hour limit on matches, the format was designed to attract a younger crowd and to boost attendances. Twenty20 proved a success, with an international version launched in 2005 and a World Twenty20 Competition held in September 2007. This proved much more popular than the 50 over Cricket World Cup had been just five months previously. The following year, the Indian Premier League (IPL) was launched, proving that there could be a market for a big-spending domestic Twenty20 cricket league. The success of Twenty20 and the IPL lead many commentators to suggest that other forms of cricket would suffer, with some worrying about the effect of the popular fast-paced ‘slogging’ game on players’ abilities in Test cricket.

    Immediately after the end of the first series of the IPL, the cricket authorities in England, India, Australia and South Africa entered into discussions to create a new international club competition, to capitalize on the this success. The new tournament’s £2.5m winning prize was described as “unprecedented” in cricket. A number of different formats for the tournament were considered, with original proposals containing a much lower prize fund. The T20 Champions League’s creation was announced on 7 June 2008, along with the announcement of planned restructuring of some of the domestic cricket tournaments involved, including the introduction of franchising in South Africa, England and Australia. Pakistan’s participation was always mooted, but not confirmed when the tournament was first launched. Following a series of discussions and the announcement of the creation of a Pakistan Super League from 2009, it was confirmed that two Pakistani teams would compete.

    Format:
    Qualifying:
    Although the 2008 tournament was originally rumoured to only include teams from Australia, South Africa, India and England, it was announced on 4 July 2008, that two teams from Pakistan’s domestic tournament were also invited. At the same, time England’s participation was also put into doubt, following differences between the ECB & BCCI over the inclusion of rebel Indian Cricket League (ICL) players. Eventually, it was arranged so that the 2008 Twenty20 Champions League is to be contested between 8 teams from 5 countries. The qualifiers are:

  • The winners and runners-up of the KFC Twenty20 Big Bash in Australia.
  • The winners and runners-up of the Standard Bank Pro 20 Series in South Africa and Zimbabwe.
  • The winners of the Twenty20 Cup in England and Wales. (Note: Runners-up Kent were not invited to participate in the inaugural tournament because it contained two players who have taken part in the rebel Indian Cricket League, a competition that is not recognized by the BCCI).
  • The winners and runners-up of the Indian Premier League in India.
  • The winners of the RBS Twenty-20 Cup from Pakistan, (Sialkot Stallions in 2007-08).

    This format is expected to change as 12 teams will compete in the 2nd edition of the tournament in September-October 2009.

    England’s Participation:
    The organisers of the tournament confirmed that any team competing would be banned from fielding players who have competed in the Indian Cricket League, a rival to the Indian Premier League. As a result of this, England’s participation in the tournament was put in jeopardy. For the the 2008 season, 15 of the 18 counties fielded 25 players from the ICL. On 24 July 2008, IPL commissioner Lalit Modi confirmed their stance by stating that only Middlesex and Essex stood a chance of being invited to the Champions League because they didn’t have ICL links. Middlesex won the Twenty20 Cup and confirmed they had accepted the invitation to participate in the tournament. Kent were officially barred from the competition on 1 August, and the ECB’s suggestion to replace them with Essex was rejected by Cricket Australia.

    Tournament:
    The Twenty20 Champions League will be played over an eight day period and will consist of two divisions competing in a round-robin format. The top two teams from each division will then move on to an elimination round to the finals.

    Links to more information on the Twenty20 Champions League:

  • Cricket Champions League unveiled
  • Everything you wanted to know about the Champions League
  • Champions League Twenty20 Moved To December

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Australia, B.C.C.I, ECB, England, India, Lalit Modi, Pakistan, South Africa, Twenty20 Champions League | Leave a Comment »

    Could this be the Black Caps chance to shine against the Aussies?

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 21, 2008

    With the Aussies losing their last Test series against the Indians, it has been said that they will be a bit vulnerable against their trans Tasman rivals the Black Caps. While the Black caps have a relatively in experienced side who knows what suprises they could pull out of their magic Black Cap.

    Imagine what will happen if the Kiwis defeat the Aussies. We havnt won a test series since 1985 when the great Richard Hadlee was perhaps in his prime and took legendary bowling figures of 15 for 123 in the Brisbane test that series (where New Zealand ultimately won 2-1). Since that series it has not beaten Australia in 18 test matches. It has, though, never been cowed psychologically in the manner of more talented England, Pakistan and South Africa teams. Being unimpressed by Australia and its sports teams is part of the New Zealand national psyche.

    Perhaps if the Kiwis manage to pull off a miraculous series win they will be instilled with immense confidence and who knows what that could do for cricket in New Zealand, perhaps produce more talent they really need and to maybe become the next “Australia” in world cricket. They will only achieve that with more consistent performances and the ability to psychologically outsmart the opposition.

    Posted in aussies, Australia, Baggy Green, black caps, Brisbane, new zealand, Richard Hadlee | 1 Comment »

    Could this be the Black Caps chance to shine against the Aussies?

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 21, 2008

    With the Aussies losing their last Test series against the Indians, it has been said that they will be a bit vulnerable against their trans Tasman rivals the Black Caps. While the Black caps have a relatively in experienced side who knows what suprises they could pull out of their magic Black Cap.

    Imagine what will happen if the Kiwis defeat the Aussies. We havnt won a test series since 1985 when the great Richard Hadlee was perhaps in his prime and took legendary bowling figures of 15 for 123 in the Brisbane test that series (where New Zealand ultimately won 2-1). Since that series it has not beaten Australia in 18 test matches. It has, though, never been cowed psychologically in the manner of more talented England, Pakistan and South Africa teams. Being unimpressed by Australia and its sports teams is part of the New Zealand national psyche.

    Perhaps if the Kiwis manage to pull off a miraculous series win they will be instilled with immense confidence and who knows what that could do for cricket in New Zealand, perhaps produce more talent they really need and to maybe become the next “Australia” in world cricket. They will only achieve that with more consistent performances and the ability to psychologically outsmart the opposition.

    Posted in aussies, Australia, Baggy Green, black caps, Brisbane, new zealand, Richard Hadlee | 1 Comment »

    Has Australia’s dominance in world cricket come to an end?

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 12, 2008

    With the 2- nil series loss to India in the Border-Gavaskar series it appears the Aussie’s dominance in world cricket may be coming to an end. They have had a good stronghold on the game since the mid 1990s when players like Shane Warne, Glenn McGrath and co came onto the scene and began strengthening their sublime mix of skill, accuracy and consistency and thus putting in elite performances for over a decade.

    With these players retirements and new blood coming into the side it appears the Australian cricket is entering a rebuilding phase. While people might not think this when they start their 2 test series against New Zealand later on it will be against stronger, more experienced opposition that many people might think their dominance on the game is loosening its grip.

    It is a fact of life, that people grow old and become a bit slower, more susceptible to injuries, and feel like they need to devote more time to their families, and it is upto the new team players coming into the side to hone the skills and knowledge of their predecessors to carry on their sides legacy. As every cricket fan must know, Australia has a big legacy in world cricket, and they are more than capable of fighting out of some precarious situations and newer players building upon the legacy the side has created and then build a strong legacy of their own.

    Every side seems to experience their rises and falls. For instance, remember the great West Indies side of the 80s, New Zealand having a dream decade in the 80s as well (when Richard Hadlee was dominating batsman all over the world with his bowling), and even Zimbabwe before politics caused the exodus of famous players like Heath Streak, Grant and Andy Flower, Paul Strang and co. It is up to players coming into the side to strive for excellence and to carry the side through the good times and the bad.

    Here is some links to the Aussie’s recent results in India:

  • India v Australia 4th Test in Nagpur, 6-10 November 2008
  • Australia tour of India September to November 2008
  • Posted in Australia, Border-Gavaskar Trophy, circle of life, dominance, India, retirement | Leave a Comment »