Cricket, the Brilliant Game!

A fresh take on cricket, the brilliant game…

Archive for December 8th, 2008

Swing Bowling Tips for Wicket Taking Success

Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 8, 2008

A bowler who has the ability to bowl swing is an important asset in any cricket team as swing bowling is a great way to baffle a batman, add pressure and take wickets. The swing bowler has the ability to move the ball in the air either away from the batsman or in towards the batsmen. The swing is created by holding the cricket ball in a specific way so that when it is released from the hand the varying levels of air resistance combined with the position the seam is directed causes the ball to swing in the air.

The swing is accentuated by polishing and shining one side of the ball so that is smooth relative to the other side, which should get roughened up through the natural course of play. Select a side to shine at the start of the match and ensure all the bowlers and fielders know which side to polish. You can polish it by rubbing sweat into it and then rubbing it on your cricket trousers.

There are three generally recognised swing delivery types, in swing, out swing and reverse swing.

The out swing delivery
is a ball which when bowled by a right handed bowler to a right handed batsman swings from the leg side towards the off side. The aim of the out swinger is to encourage the batsman into playing a drive and ideally the swing will increase the chance of getting an edge and getting the batsmen out caught behind, so make sure you’ve got some good catchers behind the stumps. You want to pitch the ball quite full, aiming at or just outside off stump so that the batsman is forced to play at the ball.

The grip for the out swing delivery is quite simple and provided the seam is up right at the point of release it should swing. You need to hold the ball as normal for a medium paced delivery with the seam vertical, however for the out swinger the seam needs to be vertical and pointing towards first or second slip at about a 15° angle, so that your fingers will be running slight across the seam. The shiny side should face the leg side of the batsmen, thus the rough side faces the off side and the direction of swing. The increased air resistance on the rough side and seam position will cause it to swing through the air towards the offside. The run up should be slightly angled and bowled from close to the stumps.

The in swing delivery is basically the reverse of the away swing in that when bowled from a right handed bowler it swings in towards a right handed batsmen from the off side towards the leg side. Have a straighter run up and deliver the ball slightly wider on the crease. In contrast to the away swing bowler, the in swing bowler aims to get the batsmen out LBW or bowled by pitching it up. Aim to bowl it so that it swings from outside off stump and pitches in line with middle and off stumps, be careful though because if you start it too straight it will swing down leg side and be easy for the batsman to hit away.

Tip: If you find yourself swinging the ball uncontrollably, hold the ball across the seam so that the seam runs horizontally, this will help negate and reduce the amount of swing.

You need to make sure that your bowlers and fielders are aware of which side of the ball in polished and that is constantly shined between deliveries. Most bowlers will shine the ball themselves but it is always useful to nominate one or two fielders to shine the ball as well while the bowler is walking back to his mark.

Changing weather conditions have an often noticeable affect on the amount that the cricket ball will swing. Dry hot sunny days don’t favour swing bowling, whereas overcast, cloudy conditions are found to be most influential at generating more swing. So take this into consideration when deciding who to bowl if you are captain.

Learn how to swing the ball in both directions with clinical accuracy so that you can destroy your opposition, by visiting www.cricketsecrets.com today.

*Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway.

Advertisements

Posted in atmospheric conditions, correct bowling techniques, how to bowl, how to bowl in swing, how to bowl out swing, humidity, in swing, out swing, overcast, reverse swing, run up | Leave a Comment »

Cricket Bowling Tips and Hints:

Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 8, 2008

When bowling in cricket there are many possible cricket tips or hints that can help improve your bowling.

In bowling, a combination of natural ability, good technique and practice is the recipe for good bowling, whether it is fast, slow or spin.

Here are some tips that will help your bowling and when implemented correctly your bowling speed:

The basic grip to hold the ball is to keep the seam vertical and to hold the ball with your index finger and middle finger either side of the seam with the side of your thumb resting on the seam underneath the ball.

In your approach/run in, try to stay:

  • Smooth,
  • Balanced,
  • Economical,
  • Rhythmical,
  • Consistent and stay relaxed and try not to tense up.

    During your approach and action, your head position is very important. Make sure that as you approach the wicket you are running at a steady, consistent speed, and increase strides. Aim to keep your head as steady and level as possible, looking towards your target.

    Pull your front arm down and through the target area, making sure you complete the delivery with a full follow through.

    Try to keep everything in the same direction, towards your target, keep your hips and shoulders parallel/in-line, and follow through the delivery in the direction where you intend the ball to go.

    Also as a bowler it is very important to stay in great shape, as you’ll enjoy the game more and perform better in the latter stages if you have good stamina. So incorporating some light weight sessions in to your training is important.

    Also aim to try and run 3 times a week to keep your cardiovascular system in top condition and to improve your stamina. South African fast bowler Makhaya Ntini, is well known for running 10Km every morning, even on match days!

    But make sure you consult your coach/doctor/gym instructor before starting any sessions.

    Discover more amazing bowling tips and tricks at www.cricketsecrets.com that will greatly enhance your all-round bowling performances.

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway.

  • Posted in bowling tips, cardiovascular training, correct bowling techniques, economical, follow through, how to bowl, how to bowl leg spin, how to bowl off spin, improve your bowling, rhythmical, stamina | Leave a Comment »

    Spin Bowling Success Tips

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 8, 2008

    The spin bowler is a key element in the bowling line up of any cricket team, the skill of Shane Warne and Muttiah Muralitharan has highlighted the potential and the shear power and influence a high class spin bowler can have in the game of cricket. The spin bowler can be used to slow the game, add pressure and most importantly attack batsmen. The spin bowler moves the ball off the pitch turning it sideways, as the spinning ball grips the pitch and turns and can also cause it to bounce variably.

    A good spin bowler needs to be able to bowl a consistent line and length, is able to turn the ball, which requires lots of practice and dedication to succeed. If you are a spin bowler you should try and experiment with varying degrees of flight, speed, and angle of approach in order to deceive the batsmen.

    There are two recognised types of spin bowlers, which are, finger spinners who are classed as the orthodox technique and use their index finger (first finger) to spin the ball and the wrist spinners who use the wrist more than fingers to spin ball.

    Target areas:

    Off spin: The off spinner aims to spin the ball from a right handed batsmen’s off side towards the leg side. Try to bowl just outside of the off stump so that the ball turns and hits the stumps, also try to entice the batsmen forward on to the front foot by bowling a full length.

    Leg spin: The leg spinner aims to bowl the ball so that it spins from a right handed batsmen’s leg side to the off side. Again try to pitch the ball up to the batsman to get them coming forward. Pitch the ball inline with the wickets so that the ball turns to hit the top of the off stump.

    The grip:

    Leg spin: Use the first two fingers to grip the ball horizontally across the seam, your third finger should be bent and running along the seam. Your thumb should rest lightly on seam and the spin is generated primarily by the third finger.

    Off spin: Again grip the ball with your first two fingers horizontally across the seam and try to spread as wide as possible apart the joints of index and middle finger. The ball then rests lightly on third finger and thumb, the spin is and produced and passed on mainly through the index finger.

    The delivery:
    The off spin delivery, should start with an angled and short delivery stride. You should then pivot on ball of the front foot keeping your bowling arm high. Cock your wrist inwards and drive your back leg through to help rotate the body. Release the ball by turning your wrist sharply from left to right and by pulling down on seam with the index finger to generate spin. The back of hand should face the off side or upwards at finish of the delivery, don’t forget to follow through properly. Keep your head as upright as possible throughout the delivery and your eyes fixed on the target at all times.

    The leg spin delivery is very similar to the off spin except with a few subtle and important variations. Your approach should be somewhat longer and have a slightly angled approach towards the target.

    As you bowl you should raise your lead arm towards the target and bowl with a braced front leg (your weight should be through this leg). Pivot on the ball of the lead foot and bring your bowling arm up high with your wrist cocked outwards. Drive your back leg through and release the ball. Generate the spin by rotating your wrist from right to left and by most importantly using the third finger to impart the most spin. Finish with your palm facing leg side.

    Follow through by rotating shoulders through the line of the wickets and driving your back leg through the action so that your hips rotate over your front foot. Keep your hips and shoulders inline and head as upright as possible throughout the delivery and your eyes fixed on the target at all times.

    The Googly and the Doosra: Deceptive deliveries
    The googly is bowled by a leg spinner and is a ball that appears to look like a leg spinner when it’s bowled but then moves unexpectedly in the opposite direction after it pitches. It’s bowled out of the back of the hand and requires the shoulder to be dropped a little at the point of release. A great example of a bowler who has mastered the googly is Shane Warne.

    The doosra is bowled by an off spinner and is a ball that initially seems to look like an off spinner when it’s bowled but then moves unexpectedly in the opposite direction after it pitches. The doosra has been pioneered by the Sri Lanka great Muttiah Muralitharan and is very difficult to bowl. Muralitharan reputedly practiced the delivery for 2-3 years in the nets and practice before using it in first class cricket…I can’t bowl it so I’m not going to go into it!

    The power and rotation on the ball are generated through a strong action and is enhanced by flicking the wrist and straightening the fingers at the point of release. Always try and spin the ball as much as you can, your consistency and accuracy will come with practice and hard work. Remember to bowl your spinners with oomph and purpose, don’t just throw it up and hope for the best.

    Tip: Examine the pitch before bowling and try to identify areas of rough, cracks and other features on the wicket to aim at which may cause increased spin, variable bounce or erratic ball behaviour when pitched on and aim to bowl the ball into these areas provided they don’t cause you to bowl bad deliveries (e.g. short and wide).

    Visit www.CricketSecrets.com right now to pick up a free report to help you improve your spin bowling today!

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway.

    Posted in doosra, drift, flight, Googly, guile, how to bowl leg spin, how to bowl off spin, Spin, Spin bowling, Spinner | Leave a Comment »

    In the International Spotlight…Italy Cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 8, 2008

    Photobucket

    The Italy national cricket team is the team that represents the country of Italy in international cricket matches. They have been an associate member of the International Cricket Council since 1995, having previously been an affiliate member since 1984. The Italian national cricket team is administered by the Federazione Cricket Italiana‎ (Italian Cricket Federation).

    They are currently ranked 27th in the world by the ICC, and are ranked fifth amongst European non-Test teams. They are in Division Four of the World Cricket League and Division One of the European Championship.

    The earliest mention of cricket in Italy is of a match played by Admiral Nelson’s sailors in Naples in 1793. Around the end of the 19th century, several combined cricket and football clubs formed, including the world famous A.C. Milan, which was originally the Milan Cricket and Football Club and the first Italian football team Genoa Cricket and Football Club, which was originally the Genoa Cricket & Athletic Club. But these clubs soon forgot about cricket and concentrated on football. Cricket started to be revived after the Second World War.

    The “Federazione Cricket Italiana” (Italian Cricket Federation) was formed in 1980, and they became an affiliate member of the ICC in 1984, and were promoted to associate member in 1995.

    In 1996, Italy took part in the first European Championship in Denmark, finishing seventh after beating Israel in a play-off. They took part in the ICC Trophy for the first time in the 1997 tournament and performed poorly, finishing joint last out of the 22 participants. They finished fifth in the following years European Championship.

    In 1999, Italy took part in a quadrangular tournament in Gibraltar also featuring France and Israel. They won the tournament, beating the hosts in the final. They finished fifth in Division One of the European Championship the following year and were due to participate in the 2001 ICC Trophy, but pulled out at the last minute due to a dispute over the eligibility of four players.

    The 2002 European Championship saw Italy finish sixth in Division One, relegating them to Division Two for 2004, which they promptly won. This qualified them for the repêchage tournament for the 2005 ICC Trophy in early 2005 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. They finished seventh in that tournament after beating Zambia in a play-off.

    They took part in Division One of the European Championship in 2006, finishing fifth. In May/June 2007, they travelled to Darwin, Australia to take part in Division Three of the World Cricket League. They finished seventh after beating Fiji in a play-off, and will play in Division Four of the World Cricket League in 2008.

    In addition to playing in Division Four of the World Cricket League in 2008 against Fiji, Hong Kong, Tanzania Italy will also participate in Division One of the European Championship in Dublin, playing against Denmark, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway and Scotland.


    Current Italian Cricket Squad:

    Joe Scuderi(captain), Luis Di Giglio, Din Alaud, Alessandro Bonora, Munasinghe Gayshan, Dylan Sarnelli, Hemantha Jayasena, Samantha Ketipe, Thushara Kurukulasuriya, Luca Poli, Andy Northcote, Nicholas Northcote, Kelum Perera and Peter Petricola.


    Links to more information on Italian Cricket:

  • Federazione Cricket Italiana(In Italian and English)
  • Italian Cricket Records on Cricketarchive.com
  • Italy Cricket at Cricinfo’s Beyond the Test World blog
  • Cricket gets noticed in soccer-mad Italy

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in European Championship, Federazione Cricket Italiana, Genoa Cricket and Football Club, ICC World Cricket League, Italian Cricket Federation, Joe Scuderi, Milan Cricket and Football Club | Leave a Comment »

    Swing Bowling Tips for Wicket Taking Success

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 8, 2008

    A bowler who has the ability to bowl swing is an important asset in any cricket team as swing bowling is a great way to baffle a batman, add pressure and take wickets. The swing bowler has the ability to move the ball in the air either away from the batsman or in towards the batsmen. The swing is created by holding the cricket ball in a specific way so that when it is released from the hand the varying levels of air resistance combined with the position the seam is directed causes the ball to swing in the air.

    The swing is accentuated by polishing and shining one side of the ball so that is smooth relative to the other side, which should get roughened up through the natural course of play. Select a side to shine at the start of the match and ensure all the bowlers and fielders know which side to polish. You can polish it by rubbing sweat into it and then rubbing it on your cricket trousers.

    There are three generally recognised swing delivery types, in swing, out swing and reverse swing.

    The out swing delivery
    is a ball which when bowled by a right handed bowler to a right handed batsman swings from the leg side towards the off side. The aim of the out swinger is to encourage the batsman into playing a drive and ideally the swing will increase the chance of getting an edge and getting the batsmen out caught behind, so make sure you’ve got some good catchers behind the stumps. You want to pitch the ball quite full, aiming at or just outside off stump so that the batsman is forced to play at the ball.

    The grip for the out swing delivery is quite simple and provided the seam is up right at the point of release it should swing. You need to hold the ball as normal for a medium paced delivery with the seam vertical, however for the out swinger the seam needs to be vertical and pointing towards first or second slip at about a 15° angle, so that your fingers will be running slight across the seam. The shiny side should face the leg side of the batsmen, thus the rough side faces the off side and the direction of swing. The increased air resistance on the rough side and seam position will cause it to swing through the air towards the offside. The run up should be slightly angled and bowled from close to the stumps.

    The in swing delivery is basically the reverse of the away swing in that when bowled from a right handed bowler it swings in towards a right handed batsmen from the off side towards the leg side. Have a straighter run up and deliver the ball slightly wider on the crease. In contrast to the away swing bowler, the in swing bowler aims to get the batsmen out LBW or bowled by pitching it up. Aim to bowl it so that it swings from outside off stump and pitches in line with middle and off stumps, be careful though because if you start it too straight it will swing down leg side and be easy for the batsman to hit away.

    Tip: If you find yourself swinging the ball uncontrollably, hold the ball across the seam so that the seam runs horizontally, this will help negate and reduce the amount of swing.

    You need to make sure that your bowlers and fielders are aware of which side of the ball in polished and that is constantly shined between deliveries. Most bowlers will shine the ball themselves but it is always useful to nominate one or two fielders to shine the ball as well while the bowler is walking back to his mark.

    Changing weather conditions have an often noticeable affect on the amount that the cricket ball will swing. Dry hot sunny days don’t favour swing bowling, whereas overcast, cloudy conditions are found to be most influential at generating more swing. So take this into consideration when deciding who to bowl if you are captain.

    Learn how to swing the ball in both directions with clinical accuracy so that you can destroy your opposition, by visiting www.cricketsecrets.com today.

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway.

    Posted in atmospheric conditions, correct bowling techniques, how to bowl, how to bowl in swing, how to bowl out swing, humidity, in swing, out swing, overcast, reverse swing, run up | Leave a Comment »

    Cricket Bowling Tips and Hints:

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 8, 2008

    When bowling in cricket there are many possible cricket tips or hints that can help improve your bowling.

    In bowling, a combination of natural ability, good technique and practice is the recipe for good bowling, whether it is fast, slow or spin.

    Here are some tips that will help your bowling and when implemented correctly your bowling speed:

    The basic grip to hold the ball is to keep the seam vertical and to hold the ball with your index finger and middle finger either side of the seam with the side of your thumb resting on the seam underneath the ball.

    In your approach/run in, try to stay:

  • Smooth,
  • Balanced,
  • Economical,
  • Rhythmical,
  • Consistent and stay relaxed and try not to tense up.

    During your approach and action, your head position is very important. Make sure that as you approach the wicket you are running at a steady, consistent speed, and increase strides. Aim to keep your head as steady and level as possible, looking towards your target.

    Pull your front arm down and through the target area, making sure you complete the delivery with a full follow through.

    Try to keep everything in the same direction, towards your target, keep your hips and shoulders parallel/in-line, and follow through the delivery in the direction where you intend the ball to go.

    Also as a bowler it is very important to stay in great shape, as you’ll enjoy the game more and perform better in the latter stages if you have good stamina. So incorporating some light weight sessions in to your training is important.

    Also aim to try and run 3 times a week to keep your cardiovascular system in top condition and to improve your stamina. South African fast bowler Makhaya Ntini, is well known for running 10Km every morning, even on match days!

    But make sure you consult your coach/doctor/gym instructor before starting any sessions.

    Discover more amazing bowling tips and tricks at www.cricketsecrets.com that will greatly enhance your all-round bowling performances.

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway.

  • Posted in bowling tips, cardiovascular training, correct bowling techniques, economical, follow through, how to bowl, how to bowl leg spin, how to bowl off spin, improve your bowling, rhythmical, stamina | Leave a Comment »

    Spin Bowling Success Tips

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 8, 2008

    The spin bowler is a key element in the bowling line up of any cricket team, the skill of Shane Warne and Muttiah Muralitharan has highlighted the potential and the shear power and influence a high class spin bowler can have in the game of cricket. The spin bowler can be used to slow the game, add pressure and most importantly attack batsmen. The spin bowler moves the ball off the pitch turning it sideways, as the spinning ball grips the pitch and turns and can also cause it to bounce variably.

    A good spin bowler needs to be able to bowl a consistent line and length, is able to turn the ball, which requires lots of practice and dedication to succeed. If you are a spin bowler you should try and experiment with varying degrees of flight, speed, and angle of approach in order to deceive the batsmen.

    There are two recognised types of spin bowlers, which are, finger spinners who are classed as the orthodox technique and use their index finger (first finger) to spin the ball and the wrist spinners who use the wrist more than fingers to spin ball.

    Target areas:

    Off spin: The off spinner aims to spin the ball from a right handed batsmen’s off side towards the leg side. Try to bowl just outside of the off stump so that the ball turns and hits the stumps, also try to entice the batsmen forward on to the front foot by bowling a full length.

    Leg spin: The leg spinner aims to bowl the ball so that it spins from a right handed batsmen’s leg side to the off side. Again try to pitch the ball up to the batsman to get them coming forward. Pitch the ball inline with the wickets so that the ball turns to hit the top of the off stump.

    The grip:

    Leg spin: Use the first two fingers to grip the ball horizontally across the seam, your third finger should be bent and running along the seam. Your thumb should rest lightly on seam and the spin is generated primarily by the third finger.

    Off spin: Again grip the ball with your first two fingers horizontally across the seam and try to spread as wide as possible apart the joints of index and middle finger. The ball then rests lightly on third finger and thumb, the spin is and produced and passed on mainly through the index finger.

    The delivery:
    The off spin delivery, should start with an angled and short delivery stride. You should then pivot on ball of the front foot keeping your bowling arm high. Cock your wrist inwards and drive your back leg through to help rotate the body. Release the ball by turning your wrist sharply from left to right and by pulling down on seam with the index finger to generate spin. The back of hand should face the off side or upwards at finish of the delivery, don’t forget to follow through properly. Keep your head as upright as possible throughout the delivery and your eyes fixed on the target at all times.

    The leg spin delivery is very similar to the off spin except with a few subtle and important variations. Your approach should be somewhat longer and have a slightly angled approach towards the target.

    As you bowl you should raise your lead arm towards the target and bowl with a braced front leg (your weight should be through this leg). Pivot on the ball of the lead foot and bring your bowling arm up high with your wrist cocked outwards. Drive your back leg through and release the ball. Generate the spin by rotating your wrist from right to left and by most importantly using the third finger to impart the most spin. Finish with your palm facing leg side.

    Follow through by rotating shoulders through the line of the wickets and driving your back leg through the action so that your hips rotate over your front foot. Keep your hips and shoulders inline and head as upright as possible throughout the delivery and your eyes fixed on the target at all times.

    The Googly and the Doosra: Deceptive deliveries
    The googly is bowled by a leg spinner and is a ball that appears to look like a leg spinner when it’s bowled but then moves unexpectedly in the opposite direction after it pitches. It’s bowled out of the back of the hand and requires the shoulder to be dropped a little at the point of release. A great example of a bowler who has mastered the googly is Shane Warne.

    The doosra is bowled by an off spinner and is a ball that initially seems to look like an off spinner when it’s bowled but then moves unexpectedly in the opposite direction after it pitches. The doosra has been pioneered by the Sri Lanka great Muttiah Muralitharan and is very difficult to bowl. Muralitharan reputedly practiced the delivery for 2-3 years in the nets and practice before using it in first class cricket…I can’t bowl it so I’m not going to go into it!

    The power and rotation on the ball are generated through a strong action and is enhanced by flicking the wrist and straightening the fingers at the point of release. Always try and spin the ball as much as you can, your consistency and accuracy will come with practice and hard work. Remember to bowl your spinners with oomph and purpose, don’t just throw it up and hope for the best.

    Tip: Examine the pitch before bowling and try to identify areas of rough, cracks and other features on the wicket to aim at which may cause increased spin, variable bounce or erratic ball behaviour when pitched on and aim to bowl the ball into these areas provided they don’t cause you to bowl bad deliveries (e.g. short and wide).

    Visit www.CricketSecrets.com right now to pick up a free report to help you improve your spin bowling today!

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway.

    Posted in doosra, drift, flight, Googly, guile, how to bowl leg spin, how to bowl off spin, Spin, Spin bowling, Spinner | Leave a Comment »