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Archive for December 7th, 2008

In the International Spotlight…Italy Cricket

Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 7, 2008

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The Italy national cricket team is the team that represents the country of Italy in international cricket matches. They have been an associate member of the International Cricket Council since 1995, having previously been an affiliate member since 1984. The Italian national cricket team is administered by the Federazione Cricket Italiana‎ (Italian Cricket Federation).

They are currently ranked 27th in the world by the ICC, and are ranked fifth amongst European non-Test teams. They are in Division Four of the World Cricket League and Division One of the European Championship.

The earliest mention of cricket in Italy is of a match played by Admiral Nelson’s sailors in Naples in 1793. Around the end of the 19th century, several combined cricket and football clubs formed, including the world famous A.C. Milan, which was originally the Milan Cricket and Football Club and the first Italian football team Genoa Cricket and Football Club, which was originally the Genoa Cricket & Athletic Club. But these clubs soon forgot about cricket and concentrated on football. Cricket started to be revived after the Second World War.

The “Federazione Cricket Italiana” (Italian Cricket Federation) was formed in 1980, and they became an affiliate member of the ICC in 1984, and were promoted to associate member in 1995.

In 1996, Italy took part in the first European Championship in Denmark, finishing seventh after beating Israel in a play-off. They took part in the ICC Trophy for the first time in the 1997 tournament and performed poorly, finishing joint last out of the 22 participants. They finished fifth in the following years European Championship.

In 1999, Italy took part in a quadrangular tournament in Gibraltar also featuring France and Israel. They won the tournament, beating the hosts in the final. They finished fifth in Division One of the European Championship the following year and were due to participate in the 2001 ICC Trophy, but pulled out at the last minute due to a dispute over the eligibility of four players.

The 2002 European Championship saw Italy finish sixth in Division One, relegating them to Division Two for 2004, which they promptly won. This qualified them for the repêchage tournament for the 2005 ICC Trophy in early 2005 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. They finished seventh in that tournament after beating Zambia in a play-off.

They took part in Division One of the European Championship in 2006, finishing fifth. In May/June 2007, they travelled to Darwin, Australia to take part in Division Three of the World Cricket League. They finished seventh after beating Fiji in a play-off, and will play in Division Four of the World Cricket League in 2008.

In addition to playing in Division Four of the World Cricket League in 2008 against Fiji, Hong Kong, Tanzania Italy will also participate in Division One of the European Championship in Dublin, playing against Denmark, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway and Scotland.


Current Italian Cricket Squad:

Joe Scuderi(captain), Luis Di Giglio, Din Alaud, Alessandro Bonora, Munasinghe Gayshan, Dylan Sarnelli, Hemantha Jayasena, Samantha Ketipe, Thushara Kurukulasuriya, Luca Poli, Andy Northcote, Nicholas Northcote, Kelum Perera and Peter Petricola.


Links to more information on Italian Cricket:

  • Federazione Cricket Italiana(In Italian and English)
  • Italian Cricket Records on Cricketarchive.com
  • Italy Cricket at Cricinfo’s Beyond the Test World blog
  • Cricket gets noticed in soccer-mad Italy

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

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  • Posted in European Championship, Federazione Cricket Italiana, Genoa Cricket and Football Club, ICC World Cricket League, Italian Cricket Federation, Joe Scuderi, Milan Cricket and Football Club | Leave a Comment »

    Cricket Batting Tips For Aspiring Batsmen

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 7, 2008

    There are hundreds of different batting tips in the game of cricket which can all potentially improve your batting and run scoring ability. Here is a selection of cricket batting tips that I’ve found useful to help improve your batting.

  • 1st Batting Tip:
  • Keep your eyes level, it’s been shown that having your eyes level helps speed up your reaction time. It makes it easier for your brain to process the incoming information if your eyes are level when the ball is delivered.

  • 2nd Batting Tip:
  • Your first movement should be from the shoulders towards the line of the ball. The rest of your body will follow naturally and will help ensure you get correctly inline with the ball.

  • 3rd Batting Tip:
  • Play the delivery based on its length, if it’s short; even if it’s in line with the wickets it should be ‘tonked away’, Andy Flintoff style, to the boundary. The same principle applies with full deliveries and half volleys.

  • 4th Batting Tip:
  • One of the most important things is to watch the ball from bowlers hand in run up all the way to the bat. By watching the ball in the bowler’s hand you can see what the bowler may be trying to do with the ball. Try to identify which is the shiny side or rough side, so you can determine which way they may be trying to swing the ball. The same applies with spinners; but also make sure you closely watch the wrist movement to determine the type and direction of spin.

  • 5th Batting Tip:
  • When batting against spinners, try doing an initial ‘forward press’ by making an initial half-step on to the front foot as the bowler bowls. This will give you a good base to play from and help give you quicker feet.

  • 6th Batting Tip:
  • It is essential to maintain a solid base when batting and to be in a solid position when you play the ball. If you watch, for example Brain Lara play a cover drive, he has a solid base from which he plays the stroke and he is perfectly balanced.

    For more cricket batting tips, cricket tips, news and gossip, head over to www.cricketsecrets.com and discover the #1 under used cricket secret, that you can use today to explode your cricket results!

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway

    Posted in batting practise, batting tips, correct batting technique, footwork, how to bat, line and length, scoring runs, shot selection | Leave a Comment »

    Cricket: The Greatest Sport On Earth?

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 7, 2008

    I’m sure you’ll agree with me that cricket is probably the greatest sport on Earth, well if you are a cricketer like me you will. The fact is for many people all around the world cricket is almost like a religion, every week fans and players go to training and watch matches, dedicated to the sport we cricketers all love.

    Learning How To Play Cricket:
    The problem with cricket is learning how to play cricket, importantly how to play cricket better than your opposition, and team mates, it’s a great feeling to be the best player on the team. Many people think they can learn how to play cricket just by going down to nets, batting and bowling for a bit, then playing at the weekends.

    The problem with this is that unless you have a good coach or senior players to oversee you, you will pick up bad habits which you reinforce every time you practice. You end up practicing bad habits and trust me this is the last thing you want.

    If you are serious about learning how to play cricket you need to do the following things to help ensure your cricket success:

  • Join a club with a good coaching system in place and that actively trains players to become coaches themselves, this ensures that there is a good coaching network within the club and so will help you progress and improve.
  • Take an active approach to improving your cricket, read books, watch video clips, or even better coaching videos of top players and learn from them. When you go to training, don’t just go through the motions, ask your coach or team mates to watch you play and pick out any faults and look to always make improvements.
  • If you have the money, pay your local pro or top coach to give you some one-on- one advice and guidance and find out where you need to be improving. If possible get someone to video you playing in a match or in the nets to help with this.

    Learning how to play cricket and improving yourself as a player is a great goal to have. However, giving tips on how to play cricket in terms of batting, bowling and fielding are beyond the scope of this article. But if you follow the tips above and take and active approach to improving your cricket you won’t go far wrong.

    Discover amazing cricket tips and tricks and learn how to play awesome cricket so that you can explode your cricket results and destroy your opposition!

    Visit, www.CricketSecrets.com right now to learn how to improve your cricket today!

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway

  • Posted in Cricket, cricketing secrets, how to bat, how to bowl, how to field, how to play cricket, improve your cricket | Leave a Comment »

    10,000 visitors, and rising…!

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 7, 2008

    I would like to let all my visitors know that I have in recent days reached my first 10,000 visitors on here! I have exceeded this goal about 6 weeks earlier than planned when I first started this site close to a year ago now, have thoroughly enjoyed working on this site and I can say I will be carrying this on for quite a while yet.

    So keep your eye out on this site as I will be updating it regularly with interesting content. Also if there is other cricketing related material on here you would like to see please let me know.

    Long live Cricket, the Brilliant Game!

    Posted in 10000 visitors, Cricket the Brilliant Game, who plays cricket, whoplayscricket, www.whoplayscricket.com | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#37)…Shivnarine Chanderpaul(West Indies)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 7, 2008

    Photobucket

    Shivnarine ‘Shiv’ Chanderpaul (born 16 August 1974 in Unity Village, Demerara-Mahaica, Guyana) is a cricketer, and former captain of the West Indies cricket team. He is the first Indo-Caribbean in the West Indies team to play 100 Tests for the West Indies and has captained them in 14 Tests and 16 One Day Internationals. Chanderpaul is currently ranked as the number one batsman in the world in the current ICC test rankings.

    Career:

    A West Indian cricketer of East Indian origin, the left-handed Chanderpaul is known for his doggedness and ability to stick on the wicket for long hours. He is infamous in the cricketing world for his very unorthodox front-on batting stance, although he shifts his body into a more conventional position when he plays the ball, thus making him a prolific scorer on both sides of the wicket. His stance allows him to get most of his runs behind the wicket. Chanderpaul is renowned for playing left arm spin bowlers by getting his pad outside the line of off-stump, and hiding his bat behind the pad, in imitation of a shot, but without the risk of edging the ball.

    Chanderpaul’s first notable impact on Test cricket was as being the last batting partner of Brian Lara when Lara broke Gary Sobers’ record of 365 not out in the fifth and final Test against England in 1993-94. Lara went on to make 375 before he was caught off Andrew Caddick’s bowling, sharing a 219-run stand with Chanderpaul, who was left not out on 75.

    Chanderpaul made his first Test century in his 19th Test match – after having scored 15 half-centuries in the preceding 18 matches. In the third of a five-Test series against India in 1996-97, he made 137* at the Kensington Oval in Bridgetown, Barbados. He also featured with his Guyanese counterpart, and current West Indian vice captain Ramnaresh Sarwan, making 104 in chasing a world record 418 to win in the fourth innings of the final Test match versus Australia in 2002-03.

    Chanderpaul’s best first class score is 303* versus Jamaica for Guyana, and, despite his reputation as a dogged batsman, he has also made the fourth fastest century in Test cricket, scoring three figures in just 67 balls at the GCC Ground Bourda, Guyana, also in the 2002-03 series against Australia.

    He was named captain of the West Indies in the first Test versus South Africa in March 2005 in Guyana, after seven senior players including captain Brian Lara were dropped in a sponsorship row. He emulated Graham Dowling to become only the second player to make a double century on debut as a Test captain, scoring an unbeaten 200 and making a sporting declaration in the first Test. It was announced that Lara would return to the team for the second Test, but Chanderpaul would retain the captaincy for the rest of the series. He was named to the squad of 20 for the World XI to face Australia in the Super Test in October 2005, but when the squad was cut to 14 names in August his name was not mentioned.

    Chanderpaul remains one of the most recognisable faces in all of the West Indies, particularly his native Guyana, and he has come a long way from his first 50 in his first Test versus England in 1993-94 at Bourda to his current status as a former captain.

    In April 2006, Chanderpaul resigned as West Indies captain in order to concentrate on his batting. He captained a weak West Indies team, and his record was not a successful one. In fourteen Tests he won one and lost ten with three draws. In sixteen One-Day Internationals, he won two and lost fourteen. Later in the month the captaincy was restored to veteran batsman Brian Lara.

    Chanderpaul has recently reached the milestone of 100 Test caps, the 8th West Indian to do so and the first of East Indian descent.At the conclusion of the 2008 Australian tour of the West Indies, Chanderpaul will appear in the All Star line up for the 2008 Hong Kong Sixes on November 8th,2008. The Hong Kong Sixes was formed in 1992, and has become an annual fixture, attracting greats such as Brian Charles Lara, , Sachin Tendulkar, Steve and Mark Waugh, Sir Viv Richards, Andrew Flintoff, Adam Gilchrist and Wasim Akram and now Shivnarine Chanderpaul adding his name to the fixtures.

    Trivia:
    Some of his quirkier traits include having “baseball-style” tape under his eyes, which he started wearing after a successful run scoring spree in the United States,[citation needed] and using a bail from the stumps to “mark his guard”. He is known for immense concentration at the crease which he can maintain for extended periods of time, drawing comparisons to batting greats such as Lara and Bradman. Chanderpaul is one of the few players to have gone 1000 minutes in Test cricket without conceding his wicket. He has done this four times, and is the only player to have done so more than once. However despite his extended stays at the wicket, he also has the ability to ‘shift gears’ particularly in the one day game where he has scored some of the fastest centuries to date. He also bats very well with the tail, often refusing to remain not out at the end of the innings trying to add as many runs as possible without exposing the tail to the strike.

    Links to more information on Shivnarine Chanderpaul:

  • Cricinfo.com profile on Shivnarine Chanderpaul
  • Shiv Chanderpaul interview on Yahoo.com
  • Cricinfo.com 2006: Chanderpaul resigns as captain
  • Shiv Chanderpaul Fan Site
  • Shiv Chanderpaul info on Cricketarchive.com
  • Cricketweb.net stat profile on Shiv Chanderpaul

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in 100 test caps, Brian Lara, GCC Ground Bourda, Guyana, Hong Kong Cricket Sixes, ICC Player of the Year, Shiv, Shivnarine Chanderpaul, Wisden Cricketer of the Year | 1 Comment »

    Cricket Batting Tips For Aspiring Batsmen

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 7, 2008

    There are hundreds of different batting tips in the game of cricket which can all potentially improve your batting and run scoring ability. Here is a selection of cricket batting tips that I’ve found useful to help improve your batting.

  • 1st Batting Tip: Keep your eyes level, it’s been shown that having your eyes level helps speed up your reaction time. It makes it easier for your brain to process the incoming information if your eyes are level when the ball is delivered.

  • 2nd Batting Tip: Your first movement should be from the shoulders towards the line of the ball. The rest of your body will follow naturally and will help ensure you get correctly inline with the ball.

  • 3rd Batting Tip: Play the delivery based on its length, if it’s short; even if it’s in line with the wickets it should be ‘tonked away’, Andy Flintoff style, to the boundary. The same principle applies with full deliveries and half volleys.

  • 4th Batting Tip: One of the most important things is to watch the ball from bowlers hand in run up all the way to the bat. By watching the ball in the bowler’s hand you can see what the bowler may be trying to do with the ball. Try to identify which is the shiny side or rough side, so you can determine which way they may be trying to swing the ball. The same applies with spinners; but also make sure you closely watch the wrist movement to determine the type and direction of spin.

  • 5th Batting Tip: When batting against spinners, try doing an initial ‘forward press’ by making an initial half-step on to the front foot as the bowler bowls. This will give you a good base to play from and help give you quicker feet.

  • 6th Batting Tip: It is essential to maintain a solid base when batting and to be in a solid position when you play the ball. If you watch, for example Brain Lara play a cover drive, he has a solid base from which he plays the stroke and he is perfectly balanced.

    For more cricket batting tips, cricket tips, news and gossip, head over to www.cricketsecrets.com and discover the #1 under used cricket secret, that you can use today to explode your cricket results!

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway

  • Posted in batting practise, batting tips, correct batting technique, footwork, how to bat, line and length, scoring runs, shot selection | Leave a Comment »

    Cricket: The Greatest Sport On Earth?

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 7, 2008

    I’m sure you’ll agree with me that cricket is probably the greatest sport on Earth, well if you are a cricketer like me you will. The fact is for many people all around the world cricket is almost like a religion, every week fans and players go to training and watch matches, dedicated to the sport we cricketers all love.

    Learning How To Play Cricket:
    The problem with cricket is learning how to play cricket, importantly how to play cricket better than your opposition, and team mates, it’s a great feeling to be the best player on the team. Many people think they can learn how to play cricket just by going down to nets, batting and bowling for a bit, then playing at the weekends.

    The problem with this is that unless you have a good coach or senior players to oversee you, you will pick up bad habits which you reinforce every time you practice. You end up practicing bad habits and trust me this is the last thing you want.

    If you are serious about learning how to play cricket you need to do the following things to help ensure your cricket success:

  • Join a club with a good coaching system in place and that actively trains players to become coaches themselves, this ensures that there is a good coaching network within the club and so will help you progress and improve.
  • Take an active approach to improving your cricket, read books, watch video clips, or even better coaching videos of top players and learn from them. When you go to training, don’t just go through the motions, ask your coach or team mates to watch you play and pick out any faults and look to always make improvements.
  • If you have the money, pay your local pro or top coach to give you some one-on- one advice and guidance and find out where you need to be improving. If possible get someone to video you playing in a match or in the nets to help with this.

    Learning how to play cricket and improving yourself as a player is a great goal to have. However, giving tips on how to play cricket in terms of batting, bowling and fielding are beyond the scope of this article. But if you follow the tips above and take and active approach to improving your cricket you won’t go far wrong.

    Discover amazing cricket tips and tricks and learn how to play awesome cricket so that you can explode your cricket results and destroy your opposition!

    Visit, www.CricketSecrets.com right now to learn how to improve your cricket today!

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway

  • Posted in Cricket, cricketing secrets, how to bat, how to bowl, how to field, how to play cricket, improve your cricket | Leave a Comment »

    10,000 visitors, and rising…!

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 7, 2008

    I would like to let all my visitors know that I have in recent days reached my first 10,000 visitors on here! I have exceeded this goal about 6 weeks earlier than planned when I first started this site close to a year ago now, have thoroughly enjoyed working on this site and I can say I will be carrying this on for quite a while yet.

    So keep your eye out on this site as I will be updating it regularly with interesting content. Also if there is other cricketing related material on here you would like to see please let me know.

    Long live Cricket, the Brilliant Game!

    Posted in 10000 visitors, Cricket the Brilliant Game, who plays cricket, whoplayscricket, www.whoplayscricket.com | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#37)…Shivnarine Chanderpaul(West Indies)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 7, 2008

    Photobucket

    Shivnarine ‘Shiv’ Chanderpaul (born 16 August 1974 in Unity Village, Demerara-Mahaica, Guyana) is a cricketer, and former captain of the West Indies cricket team. He is the first Indo-Caribbean in the West Indies team to play 100 Tests for the West Indies and has captained them in 14 Tests and 16 One Day Internationals. Chanderpaul is currently ranked as the number one batsman in the world in the current ICC test rankings.

    Career:

    A West Indian cricketer of East Indian origin, the left-handed Chanderpaul is known for his doggedness and ability to stick on the wicket for long hours. He is infamous in the cricketing world for his very unorthodox front-on batting stance, although he shifts his body into a more conventional position when he plays the ball, thus making him a prolific scorer on both sides of the wicket. His stance allows him to get most of his runs behind the wicket. Chanderpaul is renowned for playing left arm spin bowlers by getting his pad outside the line of off-stump, and hiding his bat behind the pad, in imitation of a shot, but without the risk of edging the ball.

    Chanderpaul’s first notable impact on Test cricket was as being the last batting partner of Brian Lara when Lara broke Gary Sobers’ record of 365 not out in the fifth and final Test against England in 1993-94. Lara went on to make 375 before he was caught off Andrew Caddick’s bowling, sharing a 219-run stand with Chanderpaul, who was left not out on 75.

    Chanderpaul made his first Test century in his 19th Test match – after having scored 15 half-centuries in the preceding 18 matches. In the third of a five-Test series against India in 1996-97, he made 137* at the Kensington Oval in Bridgetown, Barbados. He also featured with his Guyanese counterpart, and current West Indian vice captain Ramnaresh Sarwan, making 104 in chasing a world record 418 to win in the fourth innings of the final Test match versus Australia in 2002-03.

    Chanderpaul’s best first class score is 303* versus Jamaica for Guyana, and, despite his reputation as a dogged batsman, he has also made the fourth fastest century in Test cricket, scoring three figures in just 67 balls at the GCC Ground Bourda, Guyana, also in the 2002-03 series against Australia.

    He was named captain of the West Indies in the first Test versus South Africa in March 2005 in Guyana, after seven senior players including captain Brian Lara were dropped in a sponsorship row. He emulated Graham Dowling to become only the second player to make a double century on debut as a Test captain, scoring an unbeaten 200 and making a sporting declaration in the first Test. It was announced that Lara would return to the team for the second Test, but Chanderpaul would retain the captaincy for the rest of the series. He was named to the squad of 20 for the World XI to face Australia in the Super Test in October 2005, but when the squad was cut to 14 names in August his name was not mentioned.

    Chanderpaul remains one of the most recognisable faces in all of the West Indies, particularly his native Guyana, and he has come a long way from his first 50 in his first Test versus England in 1993-94 at Bourda to his current status as a former captain.

    In April 2006, Chanderpaul resigned as West Indies captain in order to concentrate on his batting. He captained a weak West Indies team, and his record was not a successful one. In fourteen Tests he won one and lost ten with three draws. In sixteen One-Day Internationals, he won two and lost fourteen. Later in the month the captaincy was restored to veteran batsman Brian Lara.

    Chanderpaul has recently reached the milestone of 100 Test caps, the 8th West Indian to do so and the first of East Indian descent.At the conclusion of the 2008 Australian tour of the West Indies, Chanderpaul will appear in the All Star line up for the 2008 Hong Kong Sixes on November 8th,2008. The Hong Kong Sixes was formed in 1992, and has become an annual fixture, attracting greats such as Brian Charles Lara, , Sachin Tendulkar, Steve and Mark Waugh, Sir Viv Richards, Andrew Flintoff, Adam Gilchrist and Wasim Akram and now Shivnarine Chanderpaul adding his name to the fixtures.

    Trivia:
    Some of his quirkier traits include having “baseball-style” tape under his eyes, which he started wearing after a successful run scoring spree in the United States,[citation needed] and using a bail from the stumps to “mark his guard”. He is known for immense concentration at the crease which he can maintain for extended periods of time, drawing comparisons to batting greats such as Lara and Bradman. Chanderpaul is one of the few players to have gone 1000 minutes in Test cricket without conceding his wicket. He has done this four times, and is the only player to have done so more than once. However despite his extended stays at the wicket, he also has the ability to ‘shift gears’ particularly in the one day game where he has scored some of the fastest centuries to date. He also bats very well with the tail, often refusing to remain not out at the end of the innings trying to add as many runs as possible without exposing the tail to the strike.

    Links to more information on Shivnarine Chanderpaul:

  • Cricinfo.com profile on Shivnarine Chanderpaul
  • Shiv Chanderpaul interview on Yahoo.com
  • Cricinfo.com 2006: Chanderpaul resigns as captain
  • Shiv Chanderpaul Fan Site
  • Shiv Chanderpaul info on Cricketarchive.com
  • Cricketweb.net stat profile on Shiv Chanderpaul

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in 100 test caps, Brian Lara, GCC Ground Bourda, Guyana, Hong Kong Cricket Sixes, ICC Player of the Year, Shiv, Shivnarine Chanderpaul, Wisden Cricketer of the Year | 1 Comment »