Cricket, the Brilliant Game!

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Archive for December, 2008

Cricket Fanatic(s) on Myspace.com

Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 29, 2008

I have created a Myspace page called CricketFanatic where you can join up and help promote the game of cricket amongst the social networking communities as well as promoting this site at the same time. Feel free to check it out by right-clicking HERE.

If you don’t have a Myspace account don’t stress, as you can click on the “HERE” link above and do it from there also.

Hope you enjoy your visit :).

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Posted in Cricket Fanatic, cricket on myspace, myspace cricket groups, Myspace.com, www.myspace.com | 1 Comment »

Player Profile(#43)…Dale Steyn (South Africa)

Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 29, 2008

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Dale Willem Steyn (born 27 June 1983 in Phalaborwa) is a South African cricketer who plays in Test and One Day International cricket for South Africa. Steyn plays domestic cricket in South Africa for Nashua Titans. He is a right-arm fast bowler. Steyn holds the record for the fastest South African to reach 100 wickets in Test Match cricket, a feat he achieved on 2 March 2008 . Steyn currently has the second best bowling strike rate of all time in Test match cricket (amongst bowlers who have bowled a significant number of deliveries), behind George Lohmann . He achieved a tally of 78 wickets at the world class average of 16.24 in Season 2007/08 and was subsequently rewarded with the prestigious ICC 2008 Test Cricketer of the Year Award. He also plays foor the Bangalore Royal Challengers in the Indian Premier League (IPL).

Playing style:
Steyn is an aggressive out-and-out fast bowler capable of bowling at speeds in excess of 145 km/h. He is capable of generating considerable swing and usually chosen to bowl with the new ball to maximise these attributes . Steyn is an extremely competitive cricketer and often celebrates vigorously after taking a wicket. He has stated that “(he) love(s) the buzz from bowling fast” and that “(he) want(s) to be the quickest in the world”.

Although he has the ability to hit the ball hard, Steyn is usually considered a tail-ender when batting and often bats at number ten or eleven.

International career:


Home Tests against England 2004/05:

Steyn made his debut for South Africa on 17 December 2004 in the first Test of England’s tour. His first victim in Test cricket was Marcus Trescothick whom he bowled with a fast in-swinging delivery. However, his overall performance was underwhelming, he took eight wickets at an average of 52.00, and he was dropped after bowling poorly in England’s second innings of the fourth Test in January 2005, bowling eight no balls in nine overs which went for 47 runs. England won the match by 77 runs.

One Day Internationals 2005/06:
Later that year, Steyn was picked in the squad for the African XI in the Afro-Asia Cup of 2005/06, and he made his One Day International debut on 17 August 2005. The African XI won the match, with Steyn bowling last batsman Ashish Nehra to seal victory by two runs. Steyn made his One Day International debut for South Africa on 20 January 2006 in a match against Australia at Melbourne, a match which was part of the 2005-06 VB Series. Steyn did not bowl particularly well and after another below par performance against Sri Lanka he dropped out of consideration for the South African ODI team.

Home Tests against New Zealand 2005/2006:

Following a strong season playing domestic cricket for the Titans, Steyn was recalled to the Test side to play New Zealand in April 2006. He responded to his opportunity with his first five-wicket haul in the first Test at Centurion, ripping through the New Zealand batting lineup along with Makhaya Ntini as New Zealand crumbled to 120 all out, chasing 248 to win . He finished the three Test series with 16 wickets at 26.00 and made a fine impression throughout.

Away Tests against Sri Lanka 2006:
Steyn was included in the Test team to play Sri Lanka away in a two match series in July and August 2006. In his first overseas Test, at the Sinhalese Sports Club Ground, Colombo, he took 3 for 129 as Sri Lanka piled up 756-5, with Kumar Sangakkara and Mahela Jayawardena putting together the highest Test match partnership ever (624 runs). South Africa slumped to defeat by an innings and 153 runs . In the second Test, at the Paikiasothy Saravanamuttu Stadium, Colombo, Steyn took his second five-wicket haul in Tests during Sri Lanka’s first innings, but went wicketless in their seconds innings as Sri Lanka sealed a 2-0 series victory by a single wicket. Steyn finished the series with eight wickets at an average of 36.50.

Home Tests against India 2006/07:

Steyn retained his Test place for the three match home series against India. He picked up an injury whilst bowling early in India’s first innings in the first Test at Johannesburg which prevented him from taking much further part in the game and also ruled him out of the second Test. He returned to play in the deciding third Test at Cape Town and bowled well, taking six wickets for 88 runs in the match as South Africa clinched the match and the series. He finished the series with six wickets at an average of 19.00.

Home Tests against Pakistan 2006/07:
Despite his strong performance on his return to the team in the third Test against India, Steyn missed out on a place in the first two Tests against Pakistan, with the selectors opting to play a four man attack featuring full-time spinner Paul Harris. He returned in the third Test, at Cape Town, when the selectors decided to rest Andre Nel and Shaun Pollock in preparation for the immanent 2007 Cricket World Cup. He took four wickets in the match for 87 runs as South Africa won the match by 5 wickets and took the series 2-1. As this was his only match, his average for the series was 21.75.

One Day Internationals 2007:
Steyn was recalled to the South African ODI squad in June 2007 and played in three matches between June and August, against Ireland, India and Zimbabwe. He had mixed success in these three matches, taking wickets but proving expensive.

Away Tests against Pakistan 2007/2008:

Steyn was picked for the Test squad to tour Pakistan in October, and played in both Tests. In the first Test at Karachi, during Pakistan’s second innings, he picked up his third Test five-wicket haul as Pakistan were bowled out for 263 chasing 424 to win. He had an unremarkable second Test, with the match petering out to a draw, handing South Africa the series 1-0, and finished the series with nine wickets at 24.66.

Home Tests, ODIs and T20 against New Zealand 2007/2008:

Steyn was by now an established member of the Test team, and he produced his finest series performance to date in the two Test matches against New Zealand in November. In the first Test at Johannesburg he collected his fourth and fifth five-wicket hauls (5/35 and 5/59) and his first ten-wicket match as New Zealand were thrashed by 358 runs, South Africa’s biggest victory margin in terms of runs to date. Steyn was also awarded his first Test Man-of-the-Match award. This devastating form continued into the second Test at Centurion where he picked up 4/42 in the first innings and his sixth five-wicket haul (6/49) to help South Africa to victory by an innings and 59 runs. His second ten-wicket match earnt him his second Man-of-the-Match award in a row and his series performance of 20 wickets at an average of 9.20 won him his first Man-of-the-Series award. On the back of his performance, he broke into the top five of the ICC rankings for Test bowlers for the first time in his career.

He made his Twenty20 International debut on 23 November 2007 in the one-off game against New Zealand, taking the wicket of Scott Styris and only giving up 17 runs from his four overs. He also featured in the third One Day International at Cape Town, where he had partial success, taking the wickets of the New Zealand openers, Brendon McCullum and Lou Vincent, but going for 50 runs from nine overs.

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Home Tests, ODIs and T20 against West Indies 2007/2008:

Steyn’s next international appearance was in the first Twenty20 International against the West Indies. He took the exceptional figures of 4/9 in three overs, with all four wickets being picture perfect yorkers, but was unable to stop the West Indies chasing down the target of 59 runs.

Steyn’s form continued into the Test series. He had a fairly indifferent match in the first Test at Port Elizabeth, taking 5/188 in the match as the West Indies scored their first away victory in Test matches for two and a half years, although he did hit his highest Test match score to date, 33 not out, in South Africa’s second innings. He picked up figures of 4/60 and 4/44 in the second Test at Cape Town as South Africa leveled the series and once again proved his worth in the deciding third Test at Durban by taking 1/18 and 6/72, his seventh five-wicket haul, as the West Indies were thrashed by an innings and 100 runs. His 20 wickets at 19.10 earnt him his second consecutive Man-of-the-Series award.

He played in the first three matches of the One Day International series, but couldn’t match his Test success and was briefly dropped after failing to take a wicket and going for 62 runs in his ten overs during the third match at Port Elizabeth. He was recalled for the fifth match at Johannesburg but struggled again, taking one wicket but going for 78 runs from ten overs.

Away Tests and ODIs against Bangladesh 2007/08:
In the first Test of the two match series against Bangladesh, at Dhaka, Steyn helped South Africa avoid an embarrassing defeat. Bangladesh were bowled out for 192 in their first innings, with Steyn claiming 3/27, but then South Africa collapsed to 170 all out, handing the hosts a shock 22 run lead. However Steyn (4/48) then combined with Jacques Kallis (5/30) to restrict Bangladesh to 182 all out and South Africa were able to complete a five wicket victory on the fourth day of the match. South Africa won the second Test at Chittagong comprehensively (by an innings and 205 runs) and Steyn returned figures of 4/66 and 3/35 giving him 14 wickets in the series at an average of 12.57, which won him his third consecutive Man-of-the-Series award. When Steyn dismissed Junaid Siddique in Bangladesh’s first innings (his 20th match), he claimed the record for the fastest South African to reach 100 wickets in Tests, beating Hugh Tayfield’s record of 21 matches. He holds the record amongst all players who are currently playing Test cricket. Steyn featured in the final One Day International of the three match series, going wicketless but only giving away 19 runs in 8 overs.

Away Tests against India 2007/08:

Coming into the three Test series against India predictions about how Steyn would fare were mixed, with some commentators identifying him a crucial part of a South African team which could pose a serious challenge to India, whilst others predicted he might struggle playing against a strong batting lineup on lifeless subcontinent pitches.

The first Test at Chennai turned out to be a very high scoring affair, with South Africa batting first and making 540, then India responding strongly, led by Virender Sehwag who scored 319 from 304 balls, to reach 468/1 by the end of the third day. On the fourth day Steyn helped to restrict India’s lead to 87 runs by dismissing MS Dhoni with a bouncer then blasting through the lower order, taking three wickets in two overs for the cost of two runs, all bowled with reverse swinging deliveries. He finished the innings, and the match which petered out into a tame draw, with four wickets for 103 runs. On the morning of the second Test at Ahmedabad, South Africa demolished the much vaunted Indian batting line within twenty overs, for the meagre total of 76 runs. Steyn was the pick of the bowlers taking five wickets for 23 runs, dismissing Sehwag and Rahul Dravid then mopping up the last three batsmen for the cost of 11 runs. In the second innings he added a further three wickets to his match tally, finishing the game with eight wickets for 114 runs, as South Africa completed a crushing victory by an innings and 90 runs. The final Test at Kanpur saw Steyn pick up three first innings wickets which took him to 15 wickets in the series at 20.20. As a result of this, the cumulation of an outstanding 2007/08 season in which he took 75 wickets in 11 matches, Steyn moved up to joint first place (alongside Muttiah Muralitharan) in the ICC Test match bowling rankings.

Away Tests against Australia 2008/2009:
In the 2nd test match in a 3 match series, Steyn was involved in a record 10th wicket partnership of 180 with J.P. Duminy. Steyn recorded a score of 76 (191 deliveries) in an innings that helped South Africa recover from 6-141 to post a score of 459. Steyn also starred in the first innings with figures of 5-87 (29.0 overs).

Links to more information on Dale Steyn:

  • Dale Steyn Official Website
  • Dale Steyn: Statistics, Milestones, Articles, News, Pictures
  • Dale Steyn wins 2008 ICC Test Player of the Year
  • Dale Steyn on Facebook.com
  • Dale Steyn profile on Cricinfo.com

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    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Bangalore Royal Challengers, Dale Steyn, Dale Willem Steyn, ICC 2008 Test Cricketer of the Year, Man of the Match, Man of the Series, Nashua Titans, South Africa, South African Fast Bowlers | Leave a Comment »

    We Love Cricket! A cricket community on Facebook.com

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 29, 2008

    I have created a group on Facebook for anyone and everyone who is interested in Cricket. All are welcome to join as long as you don’t post spam etc on the boards and the wall. You might be prompted to login to your Facebook profile/page before you can view it, if you don’t have a Facebook profile/page you can sign up using the sign-up link.

    I am looking at boosting numbers in this community so there can be a high level of visitor interaction and lots of interesting cricket related posts on the wall etc although you are definetly welcome to tell what you have been upto etc.

    If you want to take a sneek peek at the group right-click HERE.

    If you are having troubles getting to the group page let me know and I will try fix it for you 🙂

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    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

    Posted in cricket blog, cricket community, Cricket the Brilliant Game, Facebook.com, fans of cricket, We love cricket, Wordpress.com | Leave a Comment »

    4 wickets in 4 balls, a brilliant piece of bowling

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 28, 2008

    Heres a video of the only time in international cricket that four wickets have been taken in 4 consecutive balls. The lucky bowler was Sri Lanka’s fast bowler Lasith Malinga, who has a similar bowling action to that of Jeff Thompson, who is a legend in Australian cricketing circles. He took these wickets in a O.D.I against South Africa at the 2007 Cricket World Cup in the West Indies.

    The four consecutive wickets were all taken in the same over and the unlucky batsmen to have been dismissed (and go down in cricketing history for a not so good reason) were as follows: Shaun Pollock, Andrew Hall, Jacques Kallis and Makhaya Ntini.

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

    Posted in 2007 Cricket World Cup, 4 wickets in 4 balls, Lasith Malinga, Lasith Malinga 4 wickets in 4 balls, Sri Lanka vs South Africa | 1 Comment »

    What is Twenty20 cricket?

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 28, 2008

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    Twenty20 is a form of cricket, originally introduced in the United Kingdom for professional inter-county competition by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB), in 2003. A Twenty20 game involves two teams, each have a single innings, batting for a maximum of 20 overs.

    A Twenty20 game is completed in about two and half hours, with each innings lasting around 75 minutes, thus bringing the game closer to the timespan of other popular team sports such as football. It was introduced to create a lively form of the game which would be attractive to spectators at the ground and viewers on television and as such it has been very successful. The ECB did not intend that Twenty20 would replace other forms of cricket and these have continued alongside it.

    Since its inception the game has spread around the cricket world. On most international tours there is a Twenty20 match and most Test-playing nations have a domestic cup competition. The inaugural World Twenty20 was played in South Africa in 2007 with India defeating Pakistan in the final. The Indian Premier League is currently the largest and most popular (in terms of attendance and television audience) Twenty20 league in the world.

    History:

    Origins

    The idea of a shortened format of the game was discussed by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) in 1998 and 2001.

    When the Benson & Hedges Cup ended in 2002, the ECB needed another one day competition to fill its place. The cricketing authorities were looking to boost the games popularity with the younger generation in response to dwindling crowds and reduced sponsorship. It was intended to deliver fast paced, exciting cricket accessible to thousands of fans who were put off by the longer versions of the game.

    Twenty20 cricket was formally introduced in 2003 when the ECB launched the Twenty20 Cup and was marketed with the slogan “I don’t like cricket, I love it”.

    Twenty20 Worldwide:
    On 12 January 2005 Australia’s first Twenty20 game was played at the WACA Ground between the Western Warriors and the Victorian Bushrangers. It drew a sellout crowd of 20,700.

    Starting 11 July 2006 19 West Indies regional teams competed in what was named the Stanford 20/20 tournament. The event has been financially backed by billionaire Allen Stanford, who gave at least US$28,000,000 funding money. West Indies legends also backed the programme, and several “looked after” the teams during their stay in and around the purpose built ground in Antigua. It is intended that the tournament will be an annual event. Guyana won the inaugural event, defeating Trinidad and Tobago by 5 wickets. The top prize for the winning team was US$1,000,000, but other prizes were given throughout the tournament, such as play of the match (US$10,000) and man of the match (US$25,000).

    On 1st of November 2008 the Superstars 101-0 West Indies team beat England 99 by 10 wickets. England slumped to 33-4 and then 65-8 after 15 overs before Samit Patel’s 22 took them to 99 in 19.5 overs, still easily their lowest Twenty20 total. Chris Gayle got an amazing 65 runs not out.

    On 5 January 2007 Queensland Bulls played the New South Wales Blues at The Gabba, Brisbane. A crowd of 11,000 was expected based on pre-match ticket sales. However, an unexpected 16,000 turned up on the day to buy tickets, causing disruption and confusion for surprised Gabba staff as they were forced to throw open gates and grant many fans free entry. Attendance reached 27,653.

    For 1 February 2008’s Twenty20 match between Australia and India, the Melbourne Cricket Ground was sold out based on pre-ticket sales and 84,041 people attended the match involving the Twenty20 World Champions against the ODI World Champions.

    Twenty20 Internationals:
    On 17 February 2005 Australia defeated New Zealand in the first men’s full international Twenty20 match, played at Eden Park in Auckland. The game was played in a light-hearted manner – both sides turned out in kit similar to that worn in the 1980s, the New Zealand team’s a direct copy of that worn by the Beige Brigade. Some of the players also sported moustaches/beards and hair styles popular in the 1980s taking part in a competition amongst themselves for best retro look, at the request of the Beige Brigade. Australia won the game comprehensively, and as the result became obvious towards the end of the NZ innings, the players and umpires took things less seriously – Glenn McGrath jokingly replayed the Trevor Chappell underarm incident from a 1981 ODI between the two sides, and Billy Bowden showed him a mock red card (red cards are not normally used in cricket) in response.

    The first Twenty20 international in England was played between England and Australia at the Rose Bowl in Hampshire on the 13 June 2005, which England won by a record margin of 100 runs.

    On 9 January 2006 Australia and South Africa met in the first international Twenty20 game in Australia. In a first, each player’s nickname appeared on the back of his uniform, rather than his surname. The international match drew a crowd of 38,894 people at the The Gabba. Australia convincingly won the match with man of the match Damien Martyn scoring 96 runs.

    On 16 February 2006 New Zealand defeated West Indies in a tie-breaking bowl-out 3-0; 126 runs were scored apiece in the game proper. The game was the last international match played by Chris Cairns – NZC handed out life-size cardboard masks of his face to patrons as they entered the ground.

    Criticism:
    Although the format has proved successful, it is not without its critics. Purists[who?] feel that Twenty20 waters down the sport and draws attention away from the more serious and technical arm of the sport, first-class cricket and Test Cricket.

    It is also argued that since Twenty20 encourages far-from-technical cricket, youngsters wanting to pick up the game will be misguided into believing that cricket is all about trying to hit 6’s and 4’s no matter how you do it. Also it may create the misconception that cricket is a batsman’s game and there is little incentive learning how to bowl, since it is the bowlers that are usually at the receiving end, leading to fewer youngsters taking up bowling.

    Rules of Twenty20 Cricket:

    A Twenty20 game involves two teams, each have a single innings, batting for a maximum of 20 overs.

    The Laws of cricket apply to Twenty20 with some exceptions:

  • Each bowler may bowl a maximum of only one-fifth of the total overs per innings (generally four, for a full, uninterrupted game). i.e., 4 in the 20 overs
  • Should a bowler deliver a no ball by overstepping the popping crease, it costs 1 run and his next delivery is designated a “free-hit”, from which the batsman can only be dismissed through a run out, as is the case for the original “no ball”. (Strictly speaking, the almost never seen methods of dismissal from a “no ball” — for hitting the ball twice, obstructing the field or handling the ball — also apply to the “free-hit” delivery.)
  • Umpires may award five-run penalty runs at their discretion if they believe either team is wasting time.
  • The following fielding restrictions apply:
    -No more than five fielders can be on the leg side at any time.
    -During the first six overs, a maximum of two fielders can be outside the 30-yard circle.
    -After the first six overs, a maximum of five fielders can be outside the fielding circle.
  • If the fielding team doesn’t start to bowl their 20th over within 75 minutes, the batting side is credited an extra six runs for every whole over bowled after the 75 minute mark; the umpire may add more time to this, if he or she considers the batting team is wasting time.
  • If the match ends with the scores tied and there must be a winner, the tie is broken with a one over per side “Eliminator” or “Super Over”. Each team nominates three batsmen and one bowler to play a one over “mini-match”. In turn, each side bats one over bowled by the one nominated opposition bowler, with their innings over if they loses two wickets before the over is completed. The side with the higher score from their over wins.
  • If the teams finish tied on runs scored in that one over, the side with the higher number of sixes in its full innings and in the one-over eliminator will be declared the winner. If the teams are still tied, the one with the higher number of fours in both innings will win.

    Twenty20 Records:

  • Highest individual score – Brendon McCullum (Kolkata) 158* (73) (2008 IPL)
  • Highest team total – Sri Lanka 260/6 (20 overs) (2007 ICC World Twenty20)
  • Most sixes in an innings – Graham Napier (Essex) 16 (2008 Twenty20 Cup)
  • Most sixes in career – David Hussey 63
  • Fastest hundred – Andrew Symonds (Kent) 34 balls (2004 Twenty20 Cup)
  • Fastest fifty – Yuvraj Singh 12 balls (2007 ICC World Twenty20)
  • Most hundreds – Ian Harvey 3
  • Best innings bowling figures – Sohail Tanvir (Rajasthan) 6/14 (2008 IPL)
  • Highest Paid – M.S.Dhoni (Chennai) 5.8 million US dollars (2008 IPL)
  • Most runs in one over – Flag of India Yuvraj Sing 36, 6 balls 6 sixes (2007 ICC World Twenty20)

    Links to more information and records on Twenty20 Cricket:
  • The Twenty20 Cup
  • List of Twenty20 International Records
  • List of Twenty20 International Games
  • The history of Twenty20 Cricket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in How to play twenty20 cricket, Indian Premier League, Rules of Twenty20 Cricket, Sir Allen Stanford, Stanford 20/20, twenty20, Twenty20 Cricket, What is Twenty20 Cricket | Leave a Comment »

    In the International Spotlight…Denmark Cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 28, 2008

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    The Denmark national cricket team is the team that represents the country of Denmark in international cricket matches. They have been an associate member of the International Cricket Council since 1966 and are currently part of the ICC’s High Performance Program.

    History:
    Beginnings
    Cricket has been played in Denmark since the mid 19th century, with the first club being formed in 1865 by English railway engineers. The first organised match was played the following year between two teams of English players, with the first matches involving Danish players taking place in 1866. The game expanded greatly over the following twenty years, with 30 new clubs being formed in 1883.

    Several touring sides from England and Scotland visited the country in the early part of the 20th century, including the famous Marylebone Cricket Club. In 1933, an attempt to organise the first international match against the Netherlands failed, and it wasn’t until 1954 when the Danish national side played their first match against Oxford University, the year after the current Danish Cricket Federation was formed.

    They then began to play against other national sides, primarily the Netherlands, who they first played in 1955. They played their first match against Scotland in 1961.

    ICC Membership

    Denmark became an associate member of the ICC in 1966, drawing their international against Scotland that year. They played Bermuda for the first time in 1969 and drew their first match against Ireland in 1970. They finally picked up their first international win against the Netherlands in 1972.

    They played their first matches against Canada in 1974, losing a three-day match but winning the limited overs match. They played home internationals against East Africa and Sri Lanka, beating East Africa. They toured East Africa the following year, drawing with both East Africa and Kenya.

    They took part in the first ICC Trophy in 1979, reaching the semi final where they lost to Sri Lanka. They did not take part in the 1982 tournament. In 1983, Ole Mortensen became the first Danish player to play county cricket. Denmark returned to the ICC Trophy in 1986 and finished third after beating Bermuda in the third place play off.

    In 1989, Denmark hosted Australia for two one-day matches. They lost the first match in Brøndby by 45 runs and lost the second in Copenhagen by 54 runs. They fared better at home against Canada that year, winning twice against them. After playing both home and away against Bangladesh in 1990, they played in the ICC Trophy, reaching the second round.

    Denmark again played in the ICC Trophy in 1994, finishing tenth in the tournament after losing to Namibia in the plate final. They played their first matches against France in 1995, and hosted the first European Cricket Championship in 1996, finishing third. They finished fifth in the following years ICC Trophy and were runners up in the European Championship in 1998.

    In 1999, Denmark took part in the C & G Trophy for the first time. The following year, they took part in the ICC Emerging Nations Tournament in Zimbabwe, where they finished fourth, and the European Championship, where they finished last, without winning a game. The following year, they took part in the ICC Trophy in Canada, finishing eighth. The MCC toured Denmark in 2002, and Denmark won all three matches. They won just one match at that year’s European Championship, finishing fifth ahead of Italy.

    Present day

    The Netherlands visited Denmark in 2003, winning both matches. Denmark played a two match series against Ireland later in the year, losing both matches and missing out on qualification for the ICC Intercontinental Cup. They again finished last in the European Championship the following year. In 2005, they played their final match in the C & G Trophy, losing heavily to Northamptonshire before taking part in the 2005 ICC Trophy, where they again finished eighth.

    In 2006, Denmark again took part in the European Championship, finishing fourth after winning only against Italy. At the end of that year, it was announced that they would join the ICC’s High Performance Program from 1 April 2007.

    In August 2007, Denmark registered a win over Bermuda an ODI playing country, and towards the end of October 2007 they played in Kenya against domestic teams and Kenya A. Denmark led by Freddie Klokker who scored consecutive centuries in all their matches clean swept the Kenyan sides and Kenya A. Denmark bowled, batted and fielded exceptionally well.

    Records:

    ICC Trophy

  • Highest team total: 284/6 v Hong Kong, 29 June 2001 at Maple Leaf Cricket Club, King City, Ontario, Canada
  • Highest individual innings: 138 not out by Frederik Klokker v USA, 2 July 2005 at Armagh, Northern Ireland
  • Best bowling in an innings: 7/19 by Ole Mortensen v Israel, 24 February 1994 at Nairobi, Kenya

    Links to more information about Danish Cricket:

  • Danish Cricket Federation official site (mostly in Danish)
  • Cricinfo.com page on Demnark Cricket
  • Danish Cricket Timeline
  • Danish Cricket Records
  • Denmark Cricket Grounds

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    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Copenhagen, Cricket in Denmark, Danish Cricket, Danish Cricket Federation, European Cricket Championship, ICC Emerging Nations Tournament, ICC High Performance Program, ICC Trophy, Ole Mortensen | Leave a Comment »

    Cricket Bat Care and Maintenance -Knocking in Your New Cricket Bat

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 27, 2008

    Ideally you should knock in any new cricket bat for at least six hours, yes it’s a lot but it will help condition your bat for heavy usage without damaging it.

    You should also knock-in your new cricket bat even if it comes advertised as ‘ready to play’, as it still won’t be ready for the full force of a hard new cricket ball, especially if you catch an edge or the ball hits the toe.

    I’ve seen players go out on to the square with a brand new cricket bat, which hadn’t been knocked in. In the first over he dug out a Yorker, which resulted in a ‘fatal’ crack in the toe of the bat. If it had been knocked in properly it’s unlikely this would have ever happened. If you don’t knock in your bat you could literally be ‘throwing £200 down the pan’.

    To knock in your bat I highly recommend you use an old high quality cricket ball.

    Begin gently by tapping the bat, particularly focusing in on the edges, as these are a very vulnerable part of the bat and by the end you want the edges to be almost slightly rounded.

    Spend 2-3 hours doing this stage of knocking in the bat, making sure you cover all of the face of the bat, excluding the splice area. Don’t knock-in the back of the cricket bat.

    After you have done this gradually increase the force with which you hit the bat, making sure you systematically cover all of the face of the bat. By the end you should be hitting the bat with full force to simulate the impact of a real cricket ball.

    When you have finished knocking in the bat, you should first progress to using the bat for out field practice and then in the nets against an old used high quality cricket ball, especially avoid ‘bat breaker’ cricket balls, you know the ones, cheap, hard and usually shiny. If your bat is going to break or split it’s these balls that’ll do the damage.

    Once you’ve played the bat in for a few hours in the nets it’ll be ready to take out on to the square.

    It’s a tedious process but well worth the time and effort for the results you’ll get for your hard work. Its worth mentioning that some sports shops may offer a knocking in service for a small fee. Personally I like to do it myself to see how the bat progresses as it becomes more knocked in.

    For more cricket batting tips, cricket tips, news and gossip, head over to www.cricketsecrets.com and discover the #1 under used cricket secret, that you can use today to explode your cricket results!

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway.

    Posted in buying a cricket bat, cricket bat, cricket bat care, cricket bat maintenance, knocking in a bat | Leave a Comment »

    Cricket Bat Care and Maintenance -Knocking in Your New Cricket Bat

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 26, 2008

    Ideally you should knock in any new cricket bat for at least six hours, yes it’s a lot but it will help condition your bat for heavy usage without damaging it.

    You should also knock-in your new cricket bat even if it comes advertised as ‘ready to play’, as it still won’t be ready for the full force of a hard new cricket ball, especially if you catch an edge or the ball hits the toe.

    I’ve seen players go out on to the square with a brand new cricket bat, which hadn’t been knocked in. In the first over he dug out a Yorker, which resulted in a ‘fatal’ crack in the toe of the bat. If it had been knocked in properly it’s unlikely this would have ever happened. If you don’t knock in your bat you could literally be ‘throwing £200 down the pan’.

    To knock in your bat I highly recommend you use an old high quality cricket ball.

    Begin gently by tapping the bat, particularly focusing in on the edges, as these are a very vulnerable part of the bat and by the end you want the edges to be almost slightly rounded.

    Spend 2-3 hours doing this stage of knocking in the bat, making sure you cover all of the face of the bat, excluding the splice area. Don’t knock-in the back of the cricket bat.

    After you have done this gradually increase the force with which you hit the bat, making sure you systematically cover all of the face of the bat. By the end you should be hitting the bat with full force to simulate the impact of a real cricket ball.

    When you have finished knocking in the bat, you should first progress to using the bat for out field practice and then in the nets against an old used high quality cricket ball, especially avoid ‘bat breaker’ cricket balls, you know the ones, cheap, hard and usually shiny. If your bat is going to break or split it’s these balls that’ll do the damage.

    Once you’ve played the bat in for a few hours in the nets it’ll be ready to take out on to the square.

    It’s a tedious process but well worth the time and effort for the results you’ll get for your hard work. Its worth mentioning that some sports shops may offer a knocking in service for a small fee. Personally I like to do it myself to see how the bat progresses as it becomes more knocked in.

    For more cricket batting tips, cricket tips, news and gossip, head over to www.cricketsecrets.com and discover the #1 under used cricket secret, that you can use today to explode your cricket results!

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway.

    Posted in buying a cricket bat, cricket bat, cricket bat care, cricket bat maintenance, knocking in a bat | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#42)…Makhaya Ntini (South Africa)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 26, 2008

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    Makhaya Ntini (born 6 July 1977 in Eastern Cape Province) is a South African cricketer who was the first ethnically black player to play for the South African team. A fast bowler, he tends to bowl from wide of the crease with brisk, although not express, pace. He has survived legal controversy early on in his career to become only the third South African to take 300 Test wickets after Shaun Pollock and Allan Donald, and to reach second place in the ICC test match bowling ratings. He plays domestic cricket for the Chennai Super Kings in the Indian Premier League.

    Background:
    Ntini came from humble beginnings where he tended cattle in his home village of Mdingi in the Eastern Cape. It was there that his talent was discovered and he was sent to Dale College in King William’s Town where he would develop his game. His action was intentionally modelled on West Indian great Malcolm Marshall.[citation needed] After a brief spell with Border his break came courtesy of an injury to Roger Telemachus and Ntini was included in the South African squad to tour Australia late in 1997. His international début came on January 16th at Perth against New Zealand where he took 2/30 off his full quota of 10 overs. A couple of months later, on March 19th, he made history by becoming the first black South African Test cricketer (though not the first non-White cricketer, as bi-racial Charles Llewellyn made his Test début in 1896). The Test match was at home in Cape Town against Sri Lanka and his maiden wicket was Aravinda De Silva who would be one of his 2 wickets in the game.

    Controversy:
    His career looked like coming to an end in 1999 when Ntini was charged and then convicted of rape. The case caused widespread controversy in South Africa with his conviction generating negative publicty in view of his status as the first black South African Test cricketer. Ntini maintained his innocence and was acquitted on appeal and looked to rebuild his international cricket career.

    International career:
    Ntini returned to the South African side for a Sharjah tournament in 2000. His improvement was clear as he bowled with greater control. In 2003 he became the first South African to take 10 wickets at Lord’s Cricket Ground. Arguably his best performance, however, came on 12 April 2005, when Ntini took 13 wickets for 132 runs against the West Indies at Port of Spain. This remains the best bowling performance by a South African cricketer in a Test match. On 3 March 2006, Ntini also achieved the best bowling figures by a South African in an ODI, demolishing Australia with 6 wickets for 22 runs. Ntini is a popular figure in South African sport and he was voted their favourite sportsman in a research poll conducted by the South Africa Press Association.

    From recent performances, Ntini has established himself as South Africa’s premier fast bowler and one of the leading fast bowlers in the world. As of December 2007 he is ranked as the world’s third-best Test bowler behind Muttiah Muralitharan and Stuart Clark, and ninth-best ODI bowler, according to the ICC rankings.

    On 20 January 2007 Ntini dislodged Mohammed Sami to take his 300th test wicket, in his 74th test. On 1 August 2008 he removed England opener Alistair Cook to claim his 350th test wicket in his 90th test.

    Links to more information on Makhaya Ntini:

  • Cricinfo.com Profile on Makhaya Ntini
  • Southafrica.info Page on Makhaya Ntini
  • Makhaya Ntini Bio Page
  • Makhaya Ntini: Stats, Pics, Articles, Interviews and Milestones on Cricketfundas.com

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    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Chennai Super Kings, Dale College, Eastern Cape, Eastern Cape Province, Indian Premier League, Makhaya Ntini, South Africa | Leave a Comment »

    Cricket Batting Tips – Foot Work

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on December 26, 2008

    Recently I was asked, “is ‘foot work’ really that important?”

    When batting in cricket it is essential to have excellent footwork. As good foot work is the basis for achieving excellence in cricket and is the foundation for good batting technique.

    Foot work is absolutely necessary as all successful strokes start with effective footwork.

    If you watch Brian Lara, Michael Vaughn, Ricky Ponting, Sachin Tendulkar, all of these amazing batsmen have outstanding footwork, often when these types of players don’t perform it is simply due to lack of footwork.

    Good footwork allows you to time the ball well and place the ball in gaps. It gets you in the optimum position to hit the ball, so you can hit it where you want and with ease.

    If you have been struggling to play a particular shot for some reason it could be due to poor footwork causing bad timing and body positioning.

    With faster bowlers it is even more essential to have excellent fast and precise footwork, so that you can get into a balanced position, in-line with the ball, so you can play the ball with control.

    Getting quickly into position through footwork therefore is very important.

    The more you practice your footwork against both fast and slow bowlers the easier you will gradually find it. Many players do what we call trigger movements just before the bowler releases the ball, this helps get the feet moving into position and into line much quicker and easier, especially against faster bowlers.

    Next time you watch a game on TV watch the batsmen’s feet really closely as the bowler is about to deliver you’ll see these small ‘trigger movements’; small foot movements, which help the batsmen get in position and inline early.

    As a batsman it is absolutely necessary to develop your foot work and foot movement, as all excellent strokes start with effective and efficient footwork.

    To find out more tips on improving your footwork and stroke play feel free to visit www.cricketsecrets.com and start your run scoring spree!

    *Acknowledgements to Ian Canaway.

    Posted in correct batting technique, effective footwork, foot work, good batting technique, how to play cricket, timing, trigger movements | Leave a Comment »