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Archive for November, 2008

Introducing…the Indian Premier League

Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 30, 2008

Photobucket

The Indian Premier League (also known as the “DLF Indian Premier League” and often abbreviated as IPL), is a Twenty20 cricket competition created by the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and chaired by the Chairman & Commisoner IPL, BCCI Vice President Lalit Modi. The first season of the Indian Premier League commenced on 18 April 2008, and ended on 1 June 2008 with the victory of the Rajasthan Royals in the final at the DY Patil Stadium, Navi Mumbai.

Teams play each other two times in a round robin system, with equal number of home and away matches. The top four ranking sides will progress to the semi-finals.

The inaugural 2008 tournament started on 18 April 2008 in Bangalore and lasted for 46 days, with 59 matches scheduled, out of which 58 took place and 1 was washed out due to rain

Television rights and sponsorship:

The IPL will bring the BCCI income of US$1 billion, over a period of five to ten years, reinforcing its status as the richest board in world cricket.

All of these revenues are directed to a central pool, 40% of which will go to IPL itself, 54% to franchisees and 6% as prize money. The money will be distributed in these proportions until 2017, after which the share of IPL will be 50%, franchisees 45% and prize money 5%.

Television rights:

On 15 January 2008 it was announced that a consortium consisting of India’s Sony Entertainment Television network and Singapore-based World Sport Group secured the global broadcasting rights of the Indian Premier League. The record deal has a duration of ten years at a cost of US $1.026 billion. As part of the deal, the consortium will pay the BCCI US $918 million for the television broadcast rights and US $108 million for the promotion of the tournament.

20% of these proceeds would go to IPL, 8% as prize money and 72% would be distributed to the franchisees. The money would be distributed in these proportions until 2012, after which the IPL would go public and list its shares. Sony-WSG then re-sold parts of the broadcasting rights geographically to other companies.

Rules:
The official rules for the tournament are here. Some of the Team composition rules are:

  • Total squad strength of 16 players plus one physio and a coach.
  • No more than 8 foreign players in the squad and at most 4 in the playing XI.
  • A minimum of 4 local players must be included in each team.
  • No fewer than 4 players from the BCCI under-22 pool in each team.

    The players accorded “icon” status are: Sachin Tendulkar, Rahul Dravid, Sourav Ganguly, Yuvraj Singh and Virender Sehwag . The total spending cap for a franchisee in the first player auction was US $5m. Under-22 players are to be remunerated with a minimum annual salary of US $20,000 while for others it is US $50,000. Icon players are to be paid 15% more than the highest paid player in their respective teams.

    Franchises:
    The winning bidders for the eight franchises were announced on 24 January 2008. While the total base price for auction was US $400 million, the auction fetched US $723.59 million. The official list of franchise owners announced and the winning bids were as follows.

  • Mumbai Indians
    Owned by: Reliance Industries Limited (Mukesh Ambani)($111.9 million)
  • Royal Challengers Bangalore
    Owned by: UB group (Vijay Mallya)($111.6 million)
  • Hyderabad Deccan Chargers
    Owned by: Deccan Chronicle (T Venkatarami Reddy)($107 million)
  • Chennai Super Kings
    Owned by: India Cements (N Srinivasan)($91 million)
  • Delhi Daredevils
    Owned by: GMR Holdings (Grandhi Mallikarjuna Rao)($84 million)
  • Kings XI Punjab
    Owned by: Preity Zinta, Ness Wadia (Bombay Dyeing), Karan Paul (Apeejay Surendera Group) and Mohit Burman (Dabur)($76 million)
  • Kolkata Knight Riders
    Owned by: Red Chillies Entertainment (Shahrukh Khan, Juhi Chawla Mehta and Jai Mehta)($75.09 million)
  • Rajasthan Royals
    Owned by: Emerging Media (A.R Jha, Lachlan Murdoch, Suresh Chellaram)($67 million)

    Future Expansion:
    After the success of the first season, it has been reported that four new franchises will join the IPL in 2010-11, increasing the total number of teams to 12. The new confirmed franchises will be based in Ahmedabad and Kanpur, with Anil Ambani’s name associated with the ownership of the Ahmedabad franchise, and Sahara Group is touted as the possible suitors to buy the Kanpur franchise. Other cities being linked with getting a franchisee are Patna-Ranchi joined franchisee or a team from the North-East to promote the sport in the region and possibly one team from the north-western states of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarkhand. A second Mumbai or Delhi team has also been proposed for future expansion of two teams to take place in the 2012-13 season.

    Expansions- 2010-11 Season( 4 new teams)-

  • IPL Ahmedabad
  • IPL Kanpur
  • Any two from the following-

    1. A Patna-Ranchi joined franchisee 2. A team from the North-East 3. A team from the north-western states of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarkhand

    The unselected team from the 3 will be considered for the next set of expansions in the 2012-13 season.

    2012-13 Season( 2 new teams)-

  • The unselected 3rd team from above
  • Possibly a second franchisee from Delhi’s suburbs( Gurgaon, Ghaziabad, Faridabad, NOIDA and Greater NOIDA) and New Delhi combined
  • Possibly a second franchisee from Mumbai or a new franchisee from Pune.

    Cheerleaders:
    The IPL has been criticised by a few politicians and feminists for bringing in foreign cheerleaders, which is seen by many to not be in the traditional spirit of the game, as well as being against some Indian sensibilities. Two cheerleaders from London were asked to leave the ground at Mohali “because of the colour of their skin” by Wizcraft International Entertainment, which handles the team Kings XI Punjab. Ellesha Newton and Sherinne Anderson, both from London and of African ancestry were allegedly barred from entering the stadium by employees of Wizcraft International Entertainment on the pretext that “people don’t like dark girls here”. Both the girls also allege that an employee referred to them with the racial slur ″nigger″.

    Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) said a probe would be initiated by the IPL only if the two women officially complain to IPL commissioner Lalit Modi.

    BCCI and IPL officials are surprised that the two cheerleaders did not complain about the alleged racist behaviour while they were in India and spoke about it only after they returned to London.

    “We have not received any complaint from any cheerleaders that they were asked to leave by the Mohali-based Kings XI Punjab franchise recently because of the colour of their skin,” BCCI joint secretary M.P. Pandove said in Mohali.

    See also:

  • England – Twenty20 Cup
  • India – Indian Cricket League
  • Pakistan – Pakistan Super League
  • South Africa – Standard Bank Pro 20 Series
  • Sri Lanka – Inter-Provincial Twenty20
  • Australia – KFC Twenty20 Big Bash
  • New Zealand – State Twenty20
  • West Indies – Stanford 20/20
  • Zimbabwe – Metropolitan Bank Twenty20
  • Kenya – National Elite League Twenty20
  • Canada – Scotiabank National T20 Championship

  • Indian Premier League links:

  • Official site for Indian Premier League
  • Indian Premier League at Cricinfo
  • Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

    Posted in Chennai Super Kings, Delhi Daredevils, Hyderabad Deccan Chargers, Indian Premier League, Kings XI Punjab, Kolkata Knight Riders, Mumbai Indians, Rajasthan Royals, Royal Challengers Bangalore | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#34)… Ross Taylor (New Zealand)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 30, 2008

    Photobucket

    Luteru Ross Poutoa Lote Taylor (born 8 March 1984 in Lower Hutt) is a New Zealand cricketer. He has captained the New Zealand Under-19 side in youth internationals. Taylor has scored 132* in the State Shield in 2003-2004, and 184 in the State Championship in 2004-2005.

    International career:

    He made his debut for the New Zealand team in international cricket on 1 March 2006, in a one-day match against the West Indies. He became the second male player of Samoan heritage to play for New Zealand after Murphy Su’a.

    Taylor has been a dominant batsman on the domestic scene for the past couple of seasons. He is a clean striker of the ball, and a useful off-break bowler. Taylor scored his maiden one day century in front of a delighted crowd in Napier, playing against Sri Lanka on December 28, 2006. Unluckily for him, New Zealand were comprehensively beaten in that game, his innings aside. He also suffered dehydration and required a short hospital trip during the second innings. Taylor hit 84 against Australia in their opening game in the 2007 Commonwealth Bank series.

    Taylor’s full name is Luteru Ross Poutua Taylor; however, some sources have inaccurately recorded his name as Ross Luteru Taylor. This is because Taylor grew up answering to both Luteru and Ross when playing cricket, and did not realise he needed to write down his full name for the official New Zealand Cricket records when he was asked to fill in a questionnaire at a first-class match early in his career.

    Taylor has also played English cricket for Norwich and Coltishall wanderers in Norfolk. He was their key player and he was consistent in hitting runs.

    Memorable moments:
    His first ODI century came Vs Sri Lanka on 28 December 2006, scoring 128 (not out) off 133 balls. The innings included 12 fours and 6 sixes. Taylor scored his second century in his ODI career on 18 February 2007 against Australia. He scored 117, the 2nd highest score by a New Zealander against Australia.

    He scored his maiden Test century on 6 March 2008 at Hamilton in the first Test of the 2007/8 series against England and went on to be the leading runs scorer in the same series.

    Currently, he plays for Royal Challengers Bangalore in the Indian Premier League (IPL) and for his domestic team, the Central Districts Stags.

    Ross Taylor scored a test match career-best of 154* against England at Old Trafford Cricket Ground in May 2008, including 5 sixes and 17 fours.

    More information about Ross Taylor can be found at these links:

  • Ross Taylor Career Stats @ cricketweb.net
  • Cricinfo.com profile on Ross Taylor

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Australian Capital Territory, Bangalore Royal Challengers, Central Districts, Central Districts Under-19s, Coltishall Wanderers, new zealand, New Zealand Under-19s, Norwich, Ross Taylor | Leave a Comment »

    Introducing…the Indian Premier League

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 30, 2008

    Photobucket

    The Indian Premier League (also known as the “DLF Indian Premier League” and often abbreviated as IPL), is a Twenty20 cricket competition created by the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and chaired by the Chairman & Commisoner IPL, BCCI Vice President Lalit Modi. The first season of the Indian Premier League commenced on 18 April 2008, and ended on 1 June 2008 with the victory of the Rajasthan Royals in the final at the DY Patil Stadium, Navi Mumbai.

    Teams play each other two times in a round robin system, with equal number of home and away matches. The top four ranking sides will progress to the semi-finals.

    The inaugural 2008 tournament started on 18 April 2008 in Bangalore and lasted for 46 days, with 59 matches scheduled, out of which 58 took place and 1 was washed out due to rain

    Television rights and sponsorship:

    The IPL will bring the BCCI income of US$1 billion, over a period of five to ten years, reinforcing its status as the richest board in world cricket.

    All of these revenues are directed to a central pool, 40% of which will go to IPL itself, 54% to franchisees and 6% as prize money. The money will be distributed in these proportions until 2017, after which the share of IPL will be 50%, franchisees 45% and prize money 5%.

    Television rights:

    On 15 January 2008 it was announced that a consortium consisting of India’s Sony Entertainment Television network and Singapore-based World Sport Group secured the global broadcasting rights of the Indian Premier League. The record deal has a duration of ten years at a cost of US $1.026 billion. As part of the deal, the consortium will pay the BCCI US $918 million for the television broadcast rights and US $108 million for the promotion of the tournament.

    20% of these proceeds would go to IPL, 8% as prize money and 72% would be distributed to the franchisees. The money would be distributed in these proportions until 2012, after which the IPL would go public and list its shares. Sony-WSG then re-sold parts of the broadcasting rights geographically to other companies.

    Rules:
    The official rules for the tournament are here. Some of the Team composition rules are:

  • Total squad strength of 16 players plus one physio and a coach.
  • No more than 8 foreign players in the squad and at most 4 in the playing XI.
  • A minimum of 4 local players must be included in each team.
  • No fewer than 4 players from the BCCI under-22 pool in each team.

    The players accorded “icon” status are: Sachin Tendulkar, Rahul Dravid, Sourav Ganguly, Yuvraj Singh and Virender Sehwag . The total spending cap for a franchisee in the first player auction was US $5m. Under-22 players are to be remunerated with a minimum annual salary of US $20,000 while for others it is US $50,000. Icon players are to be paid 15% more than the highest paid player in their respective teams.

    Franchises:
    The winning bidders for the eight franchises were announced on 24 January 2008. While the total base price for auction was US $400 million, the auction fetched US $723.59 million. The official list of franchise owners announced and the winning bids were as follows.

  • Mumbai Indians
    Owned by: Reliance Industries Limited (Mukesh Ambani)($111.9 million)
  • Royal Challengers Bangalore
    Owned by: UB group (Vijay Mallya)($111.6 million)
  • Hyderabad Deccan Chargers
    Owned by: Deccan Chronicle (T Venkatarami Reddy)($107 million)
  • Chennai Super Kings
    Owned by: India Cements (N Srinivasan)($91 million)
  • Delhi Daredevils
    Owned by: GMR Holdings (Grandhi Mallikarjuna Rao)($84 million)
  • Kings XI Punjab
    Owned by: Preity Zinta, Ness Wadia (Bombay Dyeing), Karan Paul (Apeejay Surendera Group) and Mohit Burman (Dabur)($76 million)
  • Kolkata Knight Riders
    Owned by: Red Chillies Entertainment (Shahrukh Khan, Juhi Chawla Mehta and Jai Mehta)($75.09 million)
  • Rajasthan Royals
    Owned by: Emerging Media (A.R Jha, Lachlan Murdoch, Suresh Chellaram)($67 million)

    Future Expansion:
    After the success of the first season, it has been reported that four new franchises will join the IPL in 2010-11, increasing the total number of teams to 12. The new confirmed franchises will be based in Ahmedabad and Kanpur, with Anil Ambani’s name associated with the ownership of the Ahmedabad franchise, and Sahara Group is touted as the possible suitors to buy the Kanpur franchise. Other cities being linked with getting a franchisee are Patna-Ranchi joined franchisee or a team from the North-East to promote the sport in the region and possibly one team from the north-western states of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarkhand. A second Mumbai or Delhi team has also been proposed for future expansion of two teams to take place in the 2012-13 season.

    Expansions- 2010-11 Season( 4 new teams)-

  • IPL Ahmedabad
  • IPL Kanpur
  • Any two from the following-

    1. A Patna-Ranchi joined franchisee 2. A team from the North-East 3. A team from the north-western states of Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarkhand

    The unselected team from the 3 will be considered for the next set of expansions in the 2012-13 season.

    2012-13 Season( 2 new teams)-

  • The unselected 3rd team from above
  • Possibly a second franchisee from Delhi’s suburbs( Gurgaon, Ghaziabad, Faridabad, NOIDA and Greater NOIDA) and New Delhi combined
  • Possibly a second franchisee from Mumbai or a new franchisee from Pune.

    Cheerleaders:
    The IPL has been criticised by a few politicians and feminists for bringing in foreign cheerleaders, which is seen by many to not be in the traditional spirit of the game, as well as being against some Indian sensibilities. Two cheerleaders from London were asked to leave the ground at Mohali “because of the colour of their skin” by Wizcraft International Entertainment, which handles the team Kings XI Punjab. Ellesha Newton and Sherinne Anderson, both from London and of African ancestry were allegedly barred from entering the stadium by employees of Wizcraft International Entertainment on the pretext that “people don’t like dark girls here”. Both the girls also allege that an employee referred to them with the racial slur ″nigger″.

    Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) said a probe would be initiated by the IPL only if the two women officially complain to IPL commissioner Lalit Modi.

    BCCI and IPL officials are surprised that the two cheerleaders did not complain about the alleged racist behaviour while they were in India and spoke about it only after they returned to London.

    “We have not received any complaint from any cheerleaders that they were asked to leave by the Mohali-based Kings XI Punjab franchise recently because of the colour of their skin,” BCCI joint secretary M.P. Pandove said in Mohali.

    See also:

  • England – Twenty20 Cup
  • India – Indian Cricket League
  • Pakistan – Pakistan Super League
  • South Africa – Standard Bank Pro 20 Series
  • Sri Lanka – Inter-Provincial Twenty20
  • Australia – KFC Twenty20 Big Bash
  • New Zealand – State Twenty20
  • West Indies – Stanford 20/20
  • Zimbabwe – Metropolitan Bank Twenty20
  • Kenya – National Elite League Twenty20
  • Canada – Scotiabank National T20 Championship

  • Indian Premier League links:

  • Official site for Indian Premier League
  • Indian Premier League at Cricinfo
  • Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

    Posted in Chennai Super Kings, Delhi Daredevils, Hyderabad Deccan Chargers, Indian Premier League, Kings XI Punjab, Kolkata Knight Riders, Mumbai Indians, Rajasthan Royals, Royal Challengers Bangalore | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#34)… Ross Taylor (New Zealand)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 30, 2008

    Photobucket

    Luteru Ross Poutoa Lote Taylor (born 8 March 1984 in Lower Hutt) is a New Zealand cricketer. He has captained the New Zealand Under-19 side in youth internationals. Taylor has scored 132* in the State Shield in 2003-2004, and 184 in the State Championship in 2004-2005.

    International career:

    He made his debut for the New Zealand team in international cricket on 1 March 2006, in a one-day match against the West Indies. He became the second male player of Samoan heritage to play for New Zealand after Murphy Su’a.

    Taylor has been a dominant batsman on the domestic scene for the past couple of seasons. He is a clean striker of the ball, and a useful off-break bowler. Taylor scored his maiden one day century in front of a delighted crowd in Napier, playing against Sri Lanka on December 28, 2006. Unluckily for him, New Zealand were comprehensively beaten in that game, his innings aside. He also suffered dehydration and required a short hospital trip during the second innings. Taylor hit 84 against Australia in their opening game in the 2007 Commonwealth Bank series.

    Taylor’s full name is Luteru Ross Poutua Taylor; however, some sources have inaccurately recorded his name as Ross Luteru Taylor. This is because Taylor grew up answering to both Luteru and Ross when playing cricket, and did not realise he needed to write down his full name for the official New Zealand Cricket records when he was asked to fill in a questionnaire at a first-class match early in his career.

    Taylor has also played English cricket for Norwich and Coltishall wanderers in Norfolk. He was their key player and he was consistent in hitting runs.

    Memorable moments:
    His first ODI century came Vs Sri Lanka on 28 December 2006, scoring 128 (not out) off 133 balls. The innings included 12 fours and 6 sixes. Taylor scored his second century in his ODI career on 18 February 2007 against Australia. He scored 117, the 2nd highest score by a New Zealander against Australia.

    He scored his maiden Test century on 6 March 2008 at Hamilton in the first Test of the 2007/8 series against England and went on to be the leading runs scorer in the same series.

    Currently, he plays for Royal Challengers Bangalore in the Indian Premier League (IPL) and for his domestic team, the Central Districts Stags.

    Ross Taylor scored a test match career-best of 154* against England at Old Trafford Cricket Ground in May 2008, including 5 sixes and 17 fours.

    More information about Ross Taylor can be found at these links:

  • Ross Taylor Career Stats @ cricketweb.net
  • Cricinfo.com profile on Ross Taylor

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in Australian Capital Territory, Bangalore Royal Challengers, Central Districts, Central Districts Under-19s, Coltishall Wanderers, new zealand, New Zealand Under-19s, Norwich, Ross Taylor | Leave a Comment »

    Some famous cricket quotes

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 28, 2008

    Over the years there have been a number of players that have been known for their words just as much as their cricketing exploits. Some of them will never be forgotten, although some of the players on the receiving end may wish they could be.

    Here are some of the stand out quotes I have come across as of late:

    Glen McGrath (Australia) and Eddo Brandes (Zimbabwe):

    Aussie paceman Glenn McGrath was bowling to Zimbabwe number 11 Eddo Brandes – who was just missing each ball. McGrath, frustrated, went to him and inquired: “Why are you so fat?”Quick as a flash, Brandes replied, “Because every time I make love to your wife, she gives me a biscuit.”

    ———————————-

    Freddie Trueman & Raman Subba Row:

    Fearsome English fast bowler Fred Trueman extraced an edge from the batsman, which flew straight into the hands of Raman Subba Row at first slip. The ball however went right between Row’s legs to the third man boundary. Fred didn’t say a word. At the end of the over, Row ambled past Trueman and apologised sheepishly. “Sorry Fred. I should’ve kept my legs together”. Trueman retorted in classic fashion “Not you, son. Your mother should’ve!”
    ———————————-
    “It’s been very slow and dull day, but it hasn’t been boring. It’s been a good, entertaining day’s cricket. – BRIAN JOHNSTON”
    ———————————-
    “He’s usually a good puller – but he couldn’t get it up that time.” – BRIAN JOHNSTON”
    ———————————-
    “He’s fat, he’s round, he bounces on the ground, Shane Warne, Shane Warne.” – Barmy Army.
    ———————————-
    Shane Warne : “I’ve waited two years for another chance to humiliate you.”
    Daryll Cullinan : “Looks like you spent it eating.”
    ———————————-
    “What do you think this is, a f***ing tea party? No you can’t have a f***ing glass of water. You can f***ing wait like all the rest of us.”
    -Allan Border to Robin Smith.
    ———————————-
    “Mate, if you turn the bat over, you’ll see the instructions on the back!”
    -Merv Hughes to Robin Smith.
    ———————————-
    Merv Hughes : “You can’t f**king bat.”
    Robin Smith : “Hey Merv, we make a fine pair. I can’t f**king bat and you can’t f**king bowl.”
    ———————————-
    “Tufnell! Can I borrow your brain? I’m building an idiot.”
    -Voice from the crowd, Newcastle Test.
    ———————————-
    “A fart competing with thunder.”
    -Graham Gooch on England’s chances in Australia in 1990-91.
    ———————————-

    Posted in Allan Border, Biscuit, Daryll Cullinan, Eddo Brandes, entertainment, Famous cricket quotes, Fred Trueman, Glenn McGrath, Graham Gooch, Merv Hughes, Phil Tufnell, Robin Smith, Shane Warne, sledging | Leave a Comment »

    In the International Spotlight…Hong Kong Cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 28, 2008

    Photobucket

    The Hong Kong cricket team is a team representing the Chinese Special administrative region of Hong Kong in international cricket. They played their first match in 1866 and have been an associate member of the International Cricket Council since 1969.

    They played their first One Day Internationals in the 2004 Asia Cup and have played in every ICC Trophy since the 1982 tournament with the exception of the most recent event. They played in the ICC Intercontinental Cup in the 2005 tournament, and are currently ranked at 25th in the World by the ICC and are the third highest ranked Asian non-Test nation.

    The sport was introduced to Hong Kong by the English, with the first recorded game taking place in 1841, and the Hong Kong Cricket Club being founded ten years later. The Cricket Club played a number of interport matches against sides on the Chinese mainland, the first taking place against Shanghai in 1866, and in 1890 played Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) for the first time.

    1892 saw disaster when the SS Bokhara, which was carrying the team back from Shanghai, sank in a typhoon with the loss of 125 lives. There were only 23 survivors, which included only 2 of the 13 team members. The other 11 members of the team were lost.

    1948 saw the last game against Shanghai. After the communist take-over in 1949, no more games were possible in China. Jack Chegwyn led the first international team to Hong Kong in 1952, and the first tour by an MCC team was in 1966. The MCC, captained by Mike Smith played one match against the national side, winning by 74 runs. In 1969 the Hong Kong Cricket Association became an associate member of the International Cricket Council, cricket’s global ruling body.

    The year after gaining ICC membership, the Hong Kong national side played against an MCC side captained by Tony Lewis, drawing the game, but it was not until the 1982 ICC Trophy when the Hong Kong team next played. At that tournament the Hong Kong team, which featured future England Test cricketer Dermot Reeve, failed to progress beyond the first round.

    Hong Kong took part in the following three ICC Trophy tournaments, again failing to progress beyond the first round in 1986, reaching the plate competition in 1990 and the second round in 1994. They then played in the first ACC Trophy in 1996, failing to progress beyond the first round after finishing third to Bangladesh and Fiji.

    In 1997, Hong Kong returned to Chinese control and the year also saw Hong Kong record their best finish in the ICC Trophy, finishing in eighth place. They played in the ACC Trophy again in 1998, losing to Malaysia in the semi-finals.

    In 2000, Hong Kong reached the final of the ACC Trophy, qualifying for the 2002 Asia Cup, which was subsequently moved to 2004. They failed to progress beyond the first round of the 2001 ICC Trophy and lost to the UAE in the semi-finals of the ACC Trophy the following year. Their first taste of One-Day International cricket came in the 2004 Asia Cup, where they lost both first round matches to Bangladesh and Pakistan.

    Also in 2004, Hong Kong failed to progress beyond the first round of the ACC Trophy after losing in the group stages to Oman and Bahrain, missing out on qualification for the 2005 ICC Trophy in Ireland. They also reached the final of the Fast-track nations tournament, losing to the UAE. Hong Kong played in the Intercontinental Cup for the first time in 2005. They lost to the UAE and drew with Nepal, failing to reach the semi-finals. They finished last in the fast-track nations tournament the same year.

    In 2006, Hong Kong again lost to the UAE in the final of the ACC Trophy, and finished fourth in the ACC Premier League. The following year, they travelled to Darwin, Australia to take part in Division Three of the World Cricket League, finishing fifth, relegating them to Division Four for 2008.

    In October/November 2007, Hong Kong took part in the inaugural ACC Twenty20 Cup held in Kuwait, where they played in Group B against the UAE, Singapore, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. Hong Kong finished 4th in their group and failed to make to the semi-finals stage.

    Other links relating to Hong Kong cricket are:

  • List of Hong Kong ODI cricketers
  • Hong Kong national cricket captains
  • Hong Kong Cricket Association
  • Hong Kong women’s cricket team
  • Hong Kong Cricket Sixes
  • Independant Cricket Club Association of Hong Kong”

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in ACC Premier League, ACC Trophy, ACC Twenty20 Cup, Asia Cup, Cricket in Hong Kong, Hong Kong Cricket Association, Hong Kong Cricket Sixes, I.C.C Intercontinental Cup, ICC Trophy, Kowloon, SS Bokhara | Leave a Comment »

    Some famous cricket quotes

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 28, 2008

    Over the years there have been a number of players that have been known for their words just as much as their cricketing exploits. Some of them will never be forgotten, although some of the players on the receiving end may wish they could be.

    Here are some of the stand out quotes I have come across as of late:

    Glen McGrath (Australia) and Eddo Brandes (Zimbabwe):

    Aussie paceman Glenn McGrath was bowling to Zimbabwe number 11 Eddo Brandes – who was just missing each ball. McGrath, frustrated, went to him and inquired: “Why are you so fat?”Quick as a flash, Brandes replied, “Because every time I make love to your wife, she gives me a biscuit.”

    ———————————-

    Freddie Trueman & Raman Subba Row:

    Fearsome English fast bowler Fred Trueman extraced an edge from the batsman, which flew straight into the hands of Raman Subba Row at first slip. The ball however went right between Row’s legs to the third man boundary. Fred didn’t say a word. At the end of the over, Row ambled past Trueman and apologised sheepishly. “Sorry Fred. I should’ve kept my legs together”. Trueman retorted in classic fashion “Not you, son. Your mother should’ve!”
    ———————————-
    “It’s been very slow and dull day, but it hasn’t been boring. It’s been a good, entertaining day’s cricket. – BRIAN JOHNSTON”
    ———————————-
    “He’s usually a good puller – but he couldn’t get it up that time.” – BRIAN JOHNSTON”
    ———————————-
    “He’s fat, he’s round, he bounces on the ground, Shane Warne, Shane Warne.” – Barmy Army.
    ———————————-
    Shane Warne : “I’ve waited two years for another chance to humiliate you.”
    Daryll Cullinan : “Looks like you spent it eating.”
    ———————————-
    “What do you think this is, a f***ing tea party? No you can’t have a f***ing glass of water. You can f***ing wait like all the rest of us.”
    -Allan Border to Robin Smith.
    ———————————-
    “Mate, if you turn the bat over, you’ll see the instructions on the back!”
    -Merv Hughes to Robin Smith.
    ———————————-
    Merv Hughes : “You can’t f**king bat.”
    Robin Smith : “Hey Merv, we make a fine pair. I can’t f**king bat and you can’t f**king bowl.”
    ———————————-
    “Tufnell! Can I borrow your brain? I’m building an idiot.”
    -Voice from the crowd, Newcastle Test.
    ———————————-
    “A fart competing with thunder.”
    -Graham Gooch on England’s chances in Australia in 1990-91.
    ———————————-

    Posted in Allan Border, Biscuit, Daryll Cullinan, Eddo Brandes, entertainment, Famous cricket quotes, Fred Trueman, Glenn McGrath, Graham Gooch, Merv Hughes, Phil Tufnell, Robin Smith, Shane Warne, sledging | Leave a Comment »

    In the International Spotlight…Hong Kong Cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 27, 2008

    Photobucket

    The Hong Kong cricket team is a team representing the Chinese Special administrative region of Hong Kong in international cricket. They played their first match in 1866 and have been an associate member of the International Cricket Council since 1969.

    They played their first One Day Internationals in the 2004 Asia Cup and have played in every ICC Trophy since the 1982 tournament with the exception of the most recent event. They played in the ICC Intercontinental Cup in the 2005 tournament, and are currently ranked at 25th in the World by the ICC and are the third highest ranked Asian non-Test nation.

    The sport was introduced to Hong Kong by the English, with the first recorded game taking place in 1841, and the Hong Kong Cricket Club being founded ten years later. The Cricket Club played a number of interport matches against sides on the Chinese mainland, the first taking place against Shanghai in 1866, and in 1890 played Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) for the first time.

    1892 saw disaster when the SS Bokhara, which was carrying the team back from Shanghai, sank in a typhoon with the loss of 125 lives. There were only 23 survivors, which included only 2 of the 13 team members. The other 11 members of the team were lost.

    1948 saw the last game against Shanghai. After the communist take-over in 1949, no more games were possible in China. Jack Chegwyn led the first international team to Hong Kong in 1952, and the first tour by an MCC team was in 1966. The MCC, captained by Mike Smith played one match against the national side, winning by 74 runs. In 1969 the Hong Kong Cricket Association became an associate member of the International Cricket Council, cricket’s global ruling body.

    The year after gaining ICC membership, the Hong Kong national side played against an MCC side captained by Tony Lewis, drawing the game, but it was not until the 1982 ICC Trophy when the Hong Kong team next played. At that tournament the Hong Kong team, which featured future England Test cricketer Dermot Reeve, failed to progress beyond the first round.

    Hong Kong took part in the following three ICC Trophy tournaments, again failing to progress beyond the first round in 1986, reaching the plate competition in 1990 and the second round in 1994. They then played in the first ACC Trophy in 1996, failing to progress beyond the first round after finishing third to Bangladesh and Fiji.

    In 1997, Hong Kong returned to Chinese control and the year also saw Hong Kong record their best finish in the ICC Trophy, finishing in eighth place. They played in the ACC Trophy again in 1998, losing to Malaysia in the semi-finals.

    In 2000, Hong Kong reached the final of the ACC Trophy, qualifying for the 2002 Asia Cup, which was subsequently moved to 2004. They failed to progress beyond the first round of the 2001 ICC Trophy and lost to the UAE in the semi-finals of the ACC Trophy the following year. Their first taste of One-Day International cricket came in the 2004 Asia Cup, where they lost both first round matches to Bangladesh and Pakistan.

    Also in 2004, Hong Kong failed to progress beyond the first round of the ACC Trophy after losing in the group stages to Oman and Bahrain, missing out on qualification for the 2005 ICC Trophy in Ireland. They also reached the final of the Fast-track nations tournament, losing to the UAE. Hong Kong played in the Intercontinental Cup for the first time in 2005. They lost to the UAE and drew with Nepal, failing to reach the semi-finals. They finished last in the fast-track nations tournament the same year.

    In 2006, Hong Kong again lost to the UAE in the final of the ACC Trophy, and finished fourth in the ACC Premier League. The following year, they travelled to Darwin, Australia to take part in Division Three of the World Cricket League, finishing fifth, relegating them to Division Four for 2008.

    In October/November 2007, Hong Kong took part in the inaugural ACC Twenty20 Cup held in Kuwait, where they played in Group B against the UAE, Singapore, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. Hong Kong finished 4th in their group and failed to make to the semi-finals stage.

    Other links relating to Hong Kong cricket are:

  • List of Hong Kong ODI cricketers
  • Hong Kong national cricket captains
  • Hong Kong Cricket Association
  • Hong Kong women’s cricket team
  • Hong Kong Cricket Sixes
  • Independant Cricket Club Association of Hong Kong”

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    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in ACC Premier League, ACC Trophy, ACC Twenty20 Cup, Asia Cup, Cricket in Hong Kong, Hong Kong Cricket Association, Hong Kong Cricket Sixes, I.C.C Intercontinental Cup, ICC Trophy, Kowloon, SS Bokhara | Leave a Comment »

    Life is like cricket, you sometimes score sixes or you get your off stump knocked over…

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 26, 2008

    Over the years as I developed my enthusiasm for the game of cricket I started to see some similarities to cricket as I see in life in general. For example, when you play cricket you win some and you lose some (games). One day you can be so happy its like you are whacking Muralitharan or Warney for 6’s, or you could be so down in the dumps that it feels like you are constantly getting bowled by a complete novice bowler. Or another analogy I’ve had thoughts of is like when you are happy you think of your home country thrashing the Aussies (for so long they have been dominant in world cricket) by more than an innings in a test and experiencing similar feelings to the elation the winning team would feel, or when you are sad its like if your team, for example, a known test nation like New Zealand, gets thrashed by more than an innings by perhaps a non test playing team such as Bermuda or even the USA.

    Confidence and self esteem is one of the many things that drives us forward and motivates us to succeed in what we pursue. It is also how we pick up ourselves from catastrophic lows and maintain ourselves at the heights of happiness that defines our character. When I relate this to cricket I see a team that has been bowled out well short of a follow-on and they take either two paths: No#1- Sit around and do nothing and dig yourself into an even deeper hole, or no#2- Seek help and advice and work with yourself to climb yourself out of a very precarious situation (and perhaps win despite being forced to “follow on”). You see some cricketing teams get bogged down in examples like this, some just get conprehensively walloped and some do make a miraculous comeback and win, despite being made to follow on. Also as in cricket, you use the help and guidance of people around you to help yourself “win” instead of “lose”. A cricket team is like a family or a group of closely-knit friends, they are there to help you through things and to perhaps improve yourself as a person, as you would do with your own cricketing techniques.

    I see cricket as a good way to improve your life. For example there is a cricket team from Compton in Los Angeles USA called The Homiez and The Popz(I have done a post earlier this year that talks a bit about them). A few years ago their team members were gang associates, habitual drug users, even thiefs and ones having numerous other criminal records. Thanks to cricket their lives have perhaps taken a turn for the better. They have even been to the home country of cricket (England) and are working on going to Australia to play some teams there. Cricket has taught them self respect, respect in others, patience, and it takes them away from the often violent worlds they came from. Ted Hayes is their manager and from the work he has done with the team he appears to be infusing the team members with the values, virtues and life skills the game of cricket embodies.

    It is from this little piece I have written that I see that cricket does indeed have a valuable place in society. It is up to us to enthusiastically embrace the game and maintain its values for other generations to come, so that cricket will maintain its unique place in history and remain a legacy.

    Posted in circle of life, Cricket, experience, follow on, friends, Homiez and Popz, life, life skills, love of cricket, team, values, virtues | 1 Comment »

    Life is like cricket, you sometimes score sixes or you get your off stump knocked over…

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on November 26, 2008

    Over the years as I developed my enthusiasm for the game of cricket I started to see some similarities to cricket as I see in life in general. For example, when you play cricket you win some and you lose some (games). One day you can be so happy its like you are whacking Muralitharan or Warney for 6’s, or you could be so down in the dumps that it feels like you are constantly getting bowled by a complete novice bowler. Or another analogy I’ve had thoughts of is like when you are happy you think of your home country thrashing the Aussies (for so long they have been dominant in world cricket) by more than an innings in a test and experiencing similar feelings to the elation the winning team would feel, or when you are sad its like if your team, for example, a known test nation like New Zealand, gets thrashed by more than an innings by perhaps a non test playing team such as Bermuda or even the USA.

    Confidence and self esteem is one of the many things that drives us forward and motivates us to succeed in what we pursue. It is also how we pick up ourselves from catastrophic lows and maintain ourselves at the heights of happiness that defines our character. When I relate this to cricket I see a team that has been bowled out well short of a follow-on and they take either two paths: No#1- Sit around and do nothing and dig yourself into an even deeper hole, or no#2- Seek help and advice and work with yourself to climb yourself out of a very precarious situation (and perhaps win despite being forced to “follow on”). You see some cricketing teams get bogged down in examples like this, some just get conprehensively walloped and some do make a miraculous comeback and win, despite being made to follow on. Also as in cricket, you use the help and guidance of people around you to help yourself “win” instead of “lose”. A cricket team is like a family or a group of closely-knit friends, they are there to help you through things and to perhaps improve yourself as a person, as you would do with your own cricketing techniques.

    I see cricket as a good way to improve your life. For example there is a cricket team from Compton in Los Angeles USA called The Homiez and The Popz(I have done a post earlier this year that talks a bit about them). A few years ago their team members were gang associates, habitual drug users, even thiefs and ones having numerous other criminal records. Thanks to cricket their lives have perhaps taken a turn for the better. They have even been to the home country of cricket (England) and are working on going to Australia to play some teams there. Cricket has taught them self respect, respect in others, patience, and it takes them away from the often violent worlds they came from. Ted Hayes is their manager and from the work he has done with the team he appears to be infusing the team members with the values, virtues and life skills the game of cricket embodies.

    It is from this little piece I have written that I see that cricket does indeed have a valuable place in society. It is up to us to enthusiastically embrace the game and maintain its values for other generations to come, so that cricket will maintain its unique place in history and remain a legacy.

    Posted in circle of life, Cricket, experience, follow on, friends, Homiez and Popz, life, life skills, love of cricket, team, values, virtues | 1 Comment »