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Archive for May, 2008

Player Profile(#24)…Chaminda Vaas (Sri Lanka)

Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 20, 2008

Warnakulasuriya Patabendige Ushantha Joseph Chaminda Vaas, (born 27 January 1974 in Mattumagala), usually known as Chaminda Vaas, is a Sri Lankan cricketer who is regarded as being the best fast bowler to come out of the country. According to Bill Frindall, scorer and statistician for BBC Radio’s Test Match Special, Chaminda is actually his penultimate given name, therefore his initials should read WPUJC. In 2004 he gained recognition for his talent when he was selected for the World Test and one-day XI at the inaugural ICC Awards. He was once again selected for the World Test XI at the 2005 awards.

He is a left arm swing bowler. Vaas opens the bowling for Sri Lanka and is noted for his indipper. Also among his arsenal is an off cutter which is well disguised. Although his pace has dropped over the years, he has masterful control of line and length.

A past student of the prestigious St. Joseph’s College in Colombo, he made his debut for the Sri Lankan cricket team in 1994. He made an impact in his first year of international cricket as he helped Sri Lanka to their maiden Test Match victory away from home, against New Zealand at Napier. Vaas took 5-47 in the first innings and 5-43 in the second.

In 2001-02 he took 26 wickets in a series win against the West Indies. This included a match haul of 14 wickets, a feat only achieved by two fast bowlers in the subcontinent, the other being Imran Khan. He was recently selected for the Afro Asia cup but dropped out due to county commitments.

On 26th June 2007 he made his maiden test century, playing against Bangladesh he hit 100 not out in a total of 577-6 declared in Colombo.

Chaminda Vaas is Sri Lanka’s most successful fast bowler ever, having taken over 300 Test wickets. He has been the head of the Sri Lankan bowling attack for many years. He achieved his 300th wicket on December 12, 2005) against India, becoming just the second Sri Lankan bowler to do so, after Muttiah Muralitharan. He has also taken over 350 One Day International wickets, again only one of two Sri Lankans to do so. As of the 30th of March 2007 only 3 bowlers have taken more ODI wickets. His tally includes two hat tricks, the first against Zimbabwe which came in the middle of a devastating spell of 8 for 19, the best bowling figures in one-day internationals, Zimbabwe were dismissed for 38 which was the lowest score in one day internationals. The other hattrick came in the 2003 World Cup against Bangladesh and was achieved with the first three balls of the game.This had never before been seen in One Day International cricket.

Vaas is also a useful batsman down the order, and has reached 2500 Test runs, including 12 Test half-centuries and a century. Only 10 bowlers in Test history to have taken 200 wickets have scored more runs than Vaas.

As a fieldsman, he is noted for his strong arm.

See also:

Cricinfo Profile on Chaminda Vaas
Cricketarchive Profile on Chaminda Vaas

*Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.com, Cricinfo.com and owners of pictures and videos used.

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Posted in Chaminda Vaas, Colombo, Hat-trick, In Dipper, Off Cutter, Sri Lanka, St Joseph's College | Leave a Comment »

Player Profile(#24)…Chaminda Vaas (Sri Lanka)

Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 20, 2008

Warnakulasuriya Patabendige Ushantha Joseph Chaminda Vaas, (born 27 January 1974 in Mattumagala), usually known as Chaminda Vaas, is a Sri Lankan cricketer who is regarded as being the best fast bowler to come out of the country. According to Bill Frindall, scorer and statistician for BBC Radio’s Test Match Special, Chaminda is actually his penultimate given name, therefore his initials should read WPUJC. In 2004 he gained recognition for his talent when he was selected for the World Test and one-day XI at the inaugural ICC Awards. He was once again selected for the World Test XI at the 2005 awards.

He is a left arm swing bowler. Vaas opens the bowling for Sri Lanka and is noted for his indipper. Also among his arsenal is an off cutter which is well disguised. Although his pace has dropped over the years, he has masterful control of line and length.

A past student of the prestigious St. Joseph’s College in Colombo, he made his debut for the Sri Lankan cricket team in 1994. He made an impact in his first year of international cricket as he helped Sri Lanka to their maiden Test Match victory away from home, against New Zealand at Napier. Vaas took 5-47 in the first innings and 5-43 in the second.

In 2001-02 he took 26 wickets in a series win against the West Indies. This included a match haul of 14 wickets, a feat only achieved by two fast bowlers in the subcontinent, the other being Imran Khan. He was recently selected for the Afro Asia cup but dropped out due to county commitments.

On 26th June 2007 he made his maiden test century, playing against Bangladesh he hit 100 not out in a total of 577-6 declared in Colombo.

Chaminda Vaas is Sri Lanka’s most successful fast bowler ever, having taken over 300 Test wickets. He has been the head of the Sri Lankan bowling attack for many years. He achieved his 300th wicket on December 12, 2005) against India, becoming just the second Sri Lankan bowler to do so, after Muttiah Muralitharan. He has also taken over 350 One Day International wickets, again only one of two Sri Lankans to do so. As of the 30th of March 2007 only 3 bowlers have taken more ODI wickets. His tally includes two hat tricks, the first against Zimbabwe which came in the middle of a devastating spell of 8 for 19, the best bowling figures in one-day internationals, Zimbabwe were dismissed for 38 which was the lowest score in one day internationals. The other hattrick came in the 2003 World Cup against Bangladesh and was achieved with the first three balls of the game.This had never before been seen in One Day International cricket.

Vaas is also a useful batsman down the order, and has reached 2500 Test runs, including 12 Test half-centuries and a century. Only 10 bowlers in Test history to have taken 200 wickets have scored more runs than Vaas.

As a fieldsman, he is noted for his strong arm.

See also:

Cricinfo Profile on Chaminda Vaas
Cricketarchive Profile on Chaminda Vaas

Posted in Chaminda Vaas, Colombo, Hat-trick, In Dipper, Off Cutter, Sri Lanka, St Joseph's College | Leave a Comment »

The Greatest One-Day International Game Ever!

Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 17, 2008

Heres a video clip of what has been called the greatest One-Day International cricket fans have witnesses. It was the first ODI in history where the holy grail of 400 runs in an innings was surpassed (initially by Australia- vs South Africa), they scored a massive 434 runs but were in for a suprise when South Africa came to the party and knocked off those runs and ended up getting 439 for 9. The game also holds the record of the highest match aggregate in a ODI (873 runs). Of course there is much to be said about this awesome display of power hitting but it is better to watch the game than read about it:) —>>

Posted in 439 for 9, Australia, Greatest Cricket Game Ever, Last Wicket In, Makaya Ntini, Mark Boucher, ODI, one day international, South Africa | 1 Comment »

In the International Spotlight…Pakistan Cricket

Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 17, 2008

Photobucket

Photobucket

The Pakistan National Cricket Team is an international cricket team representing Pakistan. It is administrated by the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB). Pakistan is a full member of the International Cricket Council with Test and One Day International status.

Before the independence of Pakistan, cricket was played well before the first Pakistan national team was granted test match playing status. Documentation and archives show that during the 18th century, cricket was played on the western side of India and many successful Indian cricketers played for the English cricket team. It was not until July 28, 1952 that Pakistan started playing test match cricket. Their first match took place in Delhi against India on October of the same year. Their first international tour was to England during 1954. Over the half century, Pakistan has become one of the most challenging and unpredictable teams in the world, the team won the 1992 World Cup and were runners up in the 1999 World Cup. The country has produced several world-class players such as Fazal Mahmood, Hanif Mohammad, Sarfaraz Nawaz, Mushtaq Mohammad, Imran Khan, Javed Miandad, Abdul Qadir, Wasim Akram, Inzamam-ul-Haq, Waqar Younis, Mohammad Yousuf and Shoaib Akhtar.

As of October 2007, the Pakistani team has played 332 Test matches, winning 31.02%, losing 26.50% and drawing 42.46% of its games. The team is ranked sixth in the ICC Test Championship and fifth place in the ICC ODI Championship. On 28 August 2006, Pakistan won its debut Twenty20 International match in England and were runners up in the inaugral ICC World Twenty20 in September 2007.

History:

Following the Partition of India in 1947, and the establishment of the separate nation state of Pakistan, cricket in the country developed steadily and Pakistan was given Test Match status at a meeting of the Imperial Cricket Conference at Lord’s Cricket Ground on 28 July 1952 following recommendation by India, which, being the successor state of the British Raj, did not have to go through such a process.

Pakistan’s first Test match was played in Delhi in October 1952 as part of a five Test series which India won 2-1. Pakistan made their first tour of England in 1954 and drew the series 1-1 after a memorable victory at The Oval in which fast bowler Fazal Mahmood took 12 wickets. Pakistan’s first home Test match was in Dacca in January 1955 against India, after which four more Test matches were played in Bahawalpur, Lahore, Peshawar and Karachi (all five matches in the series were drawn, the first such occurrence in test history).

The team is considered a strong but unpredictable team. Traditionally Pakistani cricket has been filled with players of great talent but limited discipline, making them a team which could play inspirational cricket one day and then perform less than ordinarily another day. Over the years, competitions between India and Pakistan have always been emotionally charged and provide for intriguing contests, as talented teams from both sides of the border elevate their game to new levels to produce high-quality cricket. Pakistani contest with India in the Cricket World Cup have seen packed stadiums and elevated atmospheres no matter where the World Cup has been held.

The 1986 Australasia Cup, played in Sharjah, is remembered as a famous last-ball victory for Pakistan against arch-rivals India, with Javed Miandad emerging as a national hero. India batted first and set a target of 245 runs, leaving Pakistan with a required run rate of 4.92 runs per over. Javed Miandad came in to bat at number 3, and Pakistan lost wickets at regular intervals. Later recalling the match, Miandad stated that his main focus was to lose with dignity. With 31 runs needed in the last three overs, Miandad hit a string of boundaries while batting with his team’s lower order, until four runs were required from the last delivery of the match. Miandad received a leg side full toss from Chetan Sharma, which he hit for six over the midwicket boundary.

At the 1992 World Cup Semi Final, having won the toss New Zealand chose to bat first and ended with a total of 262. Pakistan batted conservatively yet lost wickets at regular intervals. With the departure of Imran Khan and Saleem Malik shortly thereafter, Pakistan still required 115 runs at a rate of 7.67 per over with veteran Javed Miandad being the only known batsman remaining at the crease. A young Inzamam-ul-Haq, who had just turned 22 and was not a well-known player at the time, burst onto the international stage with a match-winning 60 off 37 balls. Once Inzamam got out, Pakistan required 36 from 30 balls, which wicketkeeper Moin Khan ended with a towering six over long off, followed by the winning boundary to midwicket. The match is seen as the emergence of Inzamam onto the international stage.

The 1992 Cricket World Cup in Australia & New Zealand marked Pakistan’s first World Cup victory. It is remembered for the comeback Pakistan made after losing key players such as Waqar Younis and Saeed Anwar, and being led by an injured captain in Imran Khan. Pakistan lost 4 of their first 5 matches and were nearly eliminated in the first round of the tournament after being bowled out for 74 against England, until the match was declared as a “no result” due to rain. Captain Imran Khan famously told the team to play as “cornered tigers”, after which Pakistan won five successive matches, including, most famously, the semi-final against hosts New Zealand and the final against England.

The 2007 Cricket World Cup was one of the biggest upsets in World Cup history when Pakistan was knocked out of the competition in a shock defeat to Ireland, who were playing in their first competition. Pakistan, needing to win to qualify for the next stage after losing to the West Indies in their opening match, were put into bat by Ireland on a green pitch. They lost wickets regularly and only 4 batsmen crossed double figures. In the end they were bowled out by the resurgent Irish for 132. The Irish went on to win the match, helped by a knock of 72 from Niall O’Brien. This meant that Pakistan had been knocked out during the first round for the second consecutive World Cup. Tragedy struck the team when coach Bob Woolmer died one day later on March 18, 2007 in a hospital in Kingston, Jamaica. Jamaican police spokesman, Karl Angell, reported on March 23, 2007 that, “Mr Woolmer’s death was due to asphyxiation as a result of manual strangulation”, and that, “Mr Woolmer’s death is now being treated by the Jamaica police as a case of murder.” Subsequent to his team’s defeat and the death of Bob Woolmer, Inzamam-ul-Haq announced his resignation as captain of the team and his retirement from one-day cricket, stating that he would continue to take part in Test cricket but not as captain.

On 23 March 2007, Pakistan players and officials were questioned by Jamaican police and submitted DNA samples along with fingerprints, as part of the routine enquiries in the investigation into Woolmer’s murder. Three days after leaving the West Indies for Pakistan, via London, the Pakistan team were ruled out as suspects. The deputy commissioner of Jamaican police. Mark Shields, the detective in charge of the investigation, announced, “It’s fair to say they are now being treated as witnesses.” “I have got no evidence to suggest it was anybody in the squad.” A memorial service was held in Sacred Heart Church, Lahore, for Bob Woolmer on 1 April 2007. Among the attendees were Pakistan players and dignitaries, including Inzamam-ul-Haq, who was quoted as saying, “After Woolmer’s family, the Pakistan team was the most aggrieved by his death.” After the World Cup ended, serious doubts were raised about the investigation, with increasing speculation that Woolmer died of natural causes. This has now been accepted as fact, and the case has been closed.

On 16 July 2007, Geoff Lawson, previously head coach of New South Wales, was appointed coach of the Pakistan for two years, becoming the third foreigner to take on the role. In the 2007 ICC World Twenty20, Pakistan exceeded expectations to reach the final but ended as runners-up, after losing the final to India in a nail-biting finish.

The Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) is responsible for all first class and Test cricket played in Pakistan and by the Pakistan cricket team. It was admitted to the International Cricket Council in July 1953. The corporation has been run by former cricketers, professional administrators and trustees, who are often respected businessmen. The Board governs a network of teams sponsored by corporations and banks, city associations and clubs including advertising, broadcasting rights and internet partners.

After taking heavy flak for corruption and match fixing, the PCB re-emerged by taking the initiative to sponsor the wildly successful 2004 tour of Pakistan by arch rivals India. The PCB’s experiment with the Twenty20 cricket model has also proven popular and hopes to similarly revive popular interest in domestic games. The PCB also set up major domestic competitions such as the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy, and the ANZ Trophy.

See Also:

  • Pakistan Under-19 cricket team
  • Pakistani national cricket captains
  • Pakistan national women’s cricket team
  • India versus Pakistan cricket rivalry
  • Pakistan Cricket Team Records
  • Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB)
  • Cricinfo Pakistan
  • BBC Sport: Pakistan cricket team news and fixtures
  • Cricket in Pakistan
  • Cricket news for Pakistan
  • Online Pakistan Cricket Magazine
  • Cricinfo List of Cricket Grounds in Pakistan
  • BBC sport Pakistan Cricket

    *Acknowledgements to Wikipedia.org, Cricinfo.com and owners of pictures and videos used.

  • Posted in ANZ Trophy, Bob Woolmer, Geoff Lawson, Karachi, Lahore, Pakistan, Pakistan Cricket Board, PCB, Peshawar, Quaid-e-Azam Trophy, Rawalpindi, Shoaib Akhtar, Wasim Akram | Leave a Comment »

    The Greatest One-Day International Game Ever!

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 16, 2008

    Heres a video clip of what has been called the greatest One-Day International cricket fans have witnesses. It was the first ODI in history where the holy grail of 400 runs in an innings was surpassed (initially by Australia- vs South Africa), they scored a massive 434 runs but were in for a suprise when South Africa came to the party and knocked off those runs and ended up getting 439 for 9. The game also holds the record of the highest match aggregate in a ODI (873 runs). Of course there is much to be said about this awesome display of power hitting but it is better to watch the game than read about it:) —>>

    Posted in 439 for 9, Australia, Greatest Cricket Game Ever, Last Wicket In, Makaya Ntini, Mark Boucher, ODI, one day international, South Africa | 1 Comment »

    In the International Spotlight…Pakistan Cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 16, 2008

    Photobucket

    Photobucket

    The Pakistan National Cricket Team is an international cricket team representing Pakistan. It is administrated by the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB). Pakistan is a full member of the International Cricket Council with Test and One Day International status.

    Before the independence of Pakistan, cricket was played well before the first Pakistan national team was granted test match playing status. Documentation and archives show that during the 18th century, cricket was played on the western side of India and many successful Indian cricketers played for the English cricket team. It was not until July 28, 1952 that Pakistan started playing test match cricket. Their first match took place in Delhi against India on October of the same year. Their first international tour was to England during 1954. Over the half century, Pakistan has become one of the most challenging and unpredictable teams in the world, the team won the 1992 World Cup and were runners up in the 1999 World Cup. The country has produced several world-class players such as Fazal Mahmood, Hanif Mohammad, Sarfaraz Nawaz, Mushtaq Mohammad, Imran Khan, Javed Miandad, Abdul Qadir, Wasim Akram, Inzamam-ul-Haq, Waqar Younis, Mohammad Yousuf and Shoaib Akhtar.

    As of October 2007, the Pakistani team has played 332 Test matches, winning 31.02%, losing 26.50% and drawing 42.46% of its games. The team is ranked sixth in the ICC Test Championship and fifth place in the ICC ODI Championship. On 28 August 2006, Pakistan won its debut Twenty20 International match in England and were runners up in the inaugral ICC World Twenty20 in September 2007.

    History:

    Following the Partition of India in 1947, and the establishment of the separate nation state of Pakistan, cricket in the country developed steadily and Pakistan was given Test Match status at a meeting of the Imperial Cricket Conference at Lord’s Cricket Ground on 28 July 1952 following recommendation by India, which, being the successor state of the British Raj, did not have to go through such a process.

    Pakistan’s first Test match was played in Delhi in October 1952 as part of a five Test series which India won 2-1. Pakistan made their first tour of England in 1954 and drew the series 1-1 after a memorable victory at The Oval in which fast bowler Fazal Mahmood took 12 wickets. Pakistan’s first home Test match was in Dacca in January 1955 against India, after which four more Test matches were played in Bahawalpur, Lahore, Peshawar and Karachi (all five matches in the series were drawn, the first such occurrence in test history).

    The team is considered a strong but unpredictable team. Traditionally Pakistani cricket has been filled with players of great talent but limited discipline, making them a team which could play inspirational cricket one day and then perform less than ordinarily another day. Over the years, competitions between India and Pakistan have always been emotionally charged and provide for intriguing contests, as talented teams from both sides of the border elevate their game to new levels to produce high-quality cricket. Pakistani contest with India in the Cricket World Cup have seen packed stadiums and elevated atmospheres no matter where the World Cup has been held.

    The 1986 Australasia Cup, played in Sharjah, is remembered as a famous last-ball victory for Pakistan against arch-rivals India, with Javed Miandad emerging as a national hero. India batted first and set a target of 245 runs, leaving Pakistan with a required run rate of 4.92 runs per over. Javed Miandad came in to bat at number 3, and Pakistan lost wickets at regular intervals. Later recalling the match, Miandad stated that his main focus was to lose with dignity. With 31 runs needed in the last three overs, Miandad hit a string of boundaries while batting with his team’s lower order, until four runs were required from the last delivery of the match. Miandad received a leg side full toss from Chetan Sharma, which he hit for six over the midwicket boundary.

    At the 1992 World Cup Semi Final, having won the toss New Zealand chose to bat first and ended with a total of 262. Pakistan batted conservatively yet lost wickets at regular intervals. With the departure of Imran Khan and Saleem Malik shortly thereafter, Pakistan still required 115 runs at a rate of 7.67 per over with veteran Javed Miandad being the only known batsman remaining at the crease. A young Inzamam-ul-Haq, who had just turned 22 and was not a well-known player at the time, burst onto the international stage with a match-winning 60 off 37 balls. Once Inzamam got out, Pakistan required 36 from 30 balls, which wicketkeeper Moin Khan ended with a towering six over long off, followed by the winning boundary to midwicket. The match is seen as the emergence of Inzamam onto the international stage.

    The 1992 Cricket World Cup in Australia & New Zealand marked Pakistan’s first World Cup victory. It is remembered for the comeback Pakistan made after losing key players such as Waqar Younis and Saeed Anwar, and being led by an injured captain in Imran Khan. Pakistan lost 4 of their first 5 matches and were nearly eliminated in the first round of the tournament after being bowled out for 74 against England, until the match was declared as a “no result” due to rain. Captain Imran Khan famously told the team to play as “cornered tigers”, after which Pakistan won five successive matches, including, most famously, the semi-final against hosts New Zealand and the final against England.

    The 2007 Cricket World Cup was one of the biggest upsets in World Cup history when Pakistan was knocked out of the competition in a shock defeat to Ireland, who were playing in their first competition. Pakistan, needing to win to qualify for the next stage after losing to the West Indies in their opening match, were put into bat by Ireland on a green pitch. They lost wickets regularly and only 4 batsmen crossed double figures. In the end they were bowled out by the resurgent Irish for 132. The Irish went on to win the match, helped by a knock of 72 from Niall O’Brien. This meant that Pakistan had been knocked out during the first round for the second consecutive World Cup. Tragedy struck the team when coach Bob Woolmer died one day later on March 18, 2007 in a hospital in Kingston, Jamaica. Jamaican police spokesman, Karl Angell, reported on March 23, 2007 that, “Mr Woolmer’s death was due to asphyxiation as a result of manual strangulation”, and that, “Mr Woolmer’s death is now being treated by the Jamaica police as a case of murder.” Subsequent to his team’s defeat and the death of Bob Woolmer, Inzamam-ul-Haq announced his resignation as captain of the team and his retirement from one-day cricket, stating that he would continue to take part in Test cricket but not as captain.

    On 23 March 2007, Pakistan players and officials were questioned by Jamaican police and submitted DNA samples along with fingerprints, as part of the routine enquiries in the investigation into Woolmer’s murder. Three days after leaving the West Indies for Pakistan, via London, the Pakistan team were ruled out as suspects. The deputy commissioner of Jamaican police. Mark Shields, the detective in charge of the investigation, announced, “It’s fair to say they are now being treated as witnesses.” “I have got no evidence to suggest it was anybody in the squad.” A memorial service was held in Sacred Heart Church, Lahore, for Bob Woolmer on 1 April 2007. Among the attendees were Pakistan players and dignitaries, including Inzamam-ul-Haq, who was quoted as saying, “After Woolmer’s family, the Pakistan team was the most aggrieved by his death.” After the World Cup ended, serious doubts were raised about the investigation, with increasing speculation that Woolmer died of natural causes. This has now been accepted as fact, and the case has been closed.

    On 16 July 2007, Geoff Lawson, previously head coach of New South Wales, was appointed coach of the Pakistan for two years, becoming the third foreigner to take on the role. In the 2007 ICC World Twenty20, Pakistan exceeded expectations to reach the final but ended as runners-up, after losing the final to India in a nail-biting finish.

    The Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) is responsible for all first class and Test cricket played in Pakistan and by the Pakistan cricket team. It was admitted to the International Cricket Council in July 1953. The corporation has been run by former cricketers, professional administrators and trustees, who are often respected businessmen. The Board governs a network of teams sponsored by corporations and banks, city associations and clubs including advertising, broadcasting rights and internet partners.

    After taking heavy flak for corruption and match fixing, the PCB re-emerged by taking the initiative to sponsor the wildly successful 2004 tour of Pakistan by arch rivals India. The PCB’s experiment with the Twenty20 cricket model has also proven popular and hopes to similarly revive popular interest in domestic games. The PCB also set up major domestic competitions such as the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy, and the ANZ Trophy.

    See Also:

  • Pakistan Under-19 cricket team
  • Pakistani national cricket captains
  • Pakistan national women’s cricket team
  • India versus Pakistan cricket rivalry
  • Pakistan Cricket Team Records
  • Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB)
  • Cricinfo Pakistan
  • BBC Sport: Pakistan cricket team news and fixtures
  • Cricket in Pakistan
  • Cricket news for Pakistan
  • Online Pakistan Cricket Magazine
  • Cricinfo List of Cricket Grounds in Pakistan
  • BBC sport Pakistan Cricket
  • Posted in ANZ Trophy, Bob Woolmer, Geoff Lawson, Karachi, Lahore, Pakistan, Pakistan Cricket Board, PCB, Peshawar, Quaid-e-Azam Trophy, Rawalpindi, Shoaib Akhtar, Wasim Akram | Leave a Comment »

    The greatest bowling partnership ever in modern cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 13, 2008

    The other day I was browsing through some videos on Youtube and I came across this particular one, it perfectly shows you that the bowling pair of Wasim Akram and Waqar Younis was the best bowling partnership ever in modern cricket. With Waqar’s lethal Toe Crushers and Wasims dangerous swinging deliveries that seemed to cannon into your stumps out of nowhere, its easy to see that they were definetly one on the most destructive bowling partnerships of modern cricket, and perhaps all time.

    To show you the proof here is that video that displays a brilliant montage on this legendary bowling partnership:

    Posted in Inswinging Yorker, Lethal, Pakistan, Sultan of Swing, Swing, Toe Crusher, Waqar Younis, Wasim Akram | Leave a Comment »

    The greatest bowling partnership ever in modern cricket

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 12, 2008

    The other day I was browsing through some videos on Youtube and I came across this particular one, it perfectly shows you that the bowling pair of Wasim Akram and Waqar Younis was the best bowling partnership ever in modern cricket. With Waqar’s lethal Toe Crushers and Wasims dangerous swinging deliveries that seemed to cannon into your stumps out of nowhere, its easy to see that they were definetly one on the most destructive bowling partnerships of modern cricket, and perhaps all time.

    To show you the proof here is that video that displays a brilliant montage on this legendary bowling partnership:

    Posted in Inswinging Yorker, Lethal, Pakistan, Sultan of Swing, Swing, Toe Crusher, Waqar Younis, Wasim Akram | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#23)…Muttiah Muralitharan(Sri Lanka)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 12, 2008

    Photobucket

    Photobucket

    Muttiah Muralitharan (Tamil: முத்தையா முரளிதரன் born 17 April 1972 in Kandy, Sri Lanka), often referred to as Murali, is a Sri Lankan cricketer who was rated the greatest Test-Match bowler ever by Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack in 2002.

    He is Test cricket’s highest wicket-taker, having overtaken the previous record-holder Shane Warne on December 3, 2007. Muralitharan had held the record before when he surpassed West Indies’ Courtney Walsh’s 519 wickets in 2004. But he suffered a shoulder injury later that year and was then overtaken by Warne. He is also second in the list of wicket-takers in One Day Internationals.

    Averaging over six wickets per Test, Muttiah Muralitharan is one of the most successful bowlers in the game and the greatest player in Sri Lanka’s history. He plays domestic cricket for the Tamil Union Cricket and Athletic Club, and county cricket for Lancashire as an overseas player.

    On 28 August 28, 1992 at the age of 20, Muralitharan made his debut against Australia at the Khettarama Stadium and claimed 3 for 141. Craig McDermott was his first Test wicket. His freakish action and his angular run-up showed that this was no run-of-the-mill spinner. During his first test, there was one dismissal which convinced many of Muralitharan’s special powers. Tom Moody’s leg-stump was dislodged when he shouldered arms to a delivery that pitched at least two feet outside the off-stump.

    The youthful Muralitharan went from strength to strength, playing a major part in Sri Lanka’s back-to-back Test victories against England and New Zealand in 1992-93. It was at this point in his career that he struck a close bond with his leader, mentor and one time business partner, the authoritative captain Arjuna Ranatunga. This relationship formed the bedrock of his success and meant that there were few doubts about his status as the team’s sole wicket-taker. Ranatunga was thoroughly convinced that Muralitharan’s precocious talent would signal a new era in Sri Lanka’s short Test history.

    In August 1993 at Moratuwa, Muralitharan captured 5 for 104 in South Africa’s first innings, his first five-wicket haul in Tests. His wickets include Kepler Wessels, Hansie Cronje and Jonty Rhodes.

    Muralitharan has continued to baffle batsman outside the shores of Sri Lanka, irrespective of the team’s performance. In Sri Lanka’s humiliating drubbing at the hands of India in 1993-94, where all three Tests were innings defeats, Muralitharan was the sole success, with 12 wickets in the rubber. His perseverance in the face of some astronomical scores by the fearsome quartet of Mohammed Azharuddin, Sachin Tendulkar, Navjot Sidhu and Vinod Kambli was in sharp contrast to the submission with which his team-mates played the series.

    It was in New Zealand in March 1995 that Muralitharan displayed his qualities as a match-winner on any surface. In Sri Lanka’s first triumph on foreign soil, Muralitharan confused the crease-bound New Zealanders on a grassy pitch in Dunedin. The Sri Lankan manager Duleep Mendis’ claim that Muralitharan can turn the ball on concrete was confirmed. On the eve of his tour of Pakistan later that year, doubts were cast on his ability to trouble subcontinental batsmen. By taking 19 wickets in the series and delivering a historic 2-1 victory, the off-spinner silenced the doubters. The Pakistanis, who had negotiated Warne’s leg-breaks in the previous home series, were never at ease against him.

    Prior to the eventful boxing day test of 1995, Muralitharan had captured 80 wickets in 22 tests at an unflattering average of 32.74. Even at that point in his career he was the leading wicket taker for Sri Lanka having gone past Rumesh Ratnayake’s aggregate of 73 wickets.

    Muttiah Muralitharan is a Sri Lankan Tamil of Indian origin. His paternal grandfather Periyasamy Sinasamy came from South India to work in the tea plantations of central Sri Lanka in 1920. He later returned to India with his daughters and settled in Tiruchirapalli. However his sons, including Muralitharan’s father remained in Sri Lanka.

    Muralitharan was born in the village of Nattarampotha in Kundasale (near Kandy), as the eldest of the four sons to Sinnasamy Muttiah and Lakshmi. Muralitharan’s father Sinnasamy Muttiah, runs a successful biscuit-making business.

    When he was nine years old Muralitharan was sent to St.Anthony’s College, Kandy, a private school run by Benedictine monks. He began his cricketing career as a medium pace bowler, but on the advice of his school coach, Sunil Fernando, he took up off spin when he was fourteen years old. He soon impressed and went on to play for four years in the school First XI. In those days he played as an all rounder and batted in the middle order. In his final two seasons at St Anthony’s college he took over one hundred wickets and in 1990/1 was named as the ‘Bata Schoolboy Cricketer of the Year’.

    After leaving school, he joined Tamil Union Cricket and Athletic Club and was selected for the Sri Lanka A tour of England in 1991. He played in five games but failed to capture a single wicket. On his return to Sri Lanka he impressed against Allan Border’s Australian team in a practice game and then went on to make his test debut at R. Premadasa Stadium in the Second Test Match of the series.

    When his grandfather died at the age of 104, in July 2004, Muralitharan returned home from a tour of India to attend his funeral. Periyasamy Sinasamy’s first wish to see Muralitharan claiming the world record for the most Test wickets was realised (passing the record set by Courtney Walsh), but not his desire to live to see his grandson married. Muralitharan’s grandmother had passed away one month earlier at the age of 97. Muralitharan’s manager, Kushil Gunasekera stated that “Murali’s family is closely knit and united. They respect traditional values. The late grandfather enjoyed a great relationship with Murali.”

    Muralitharan, married Madhimalar Ramamurthy, an Indian national, on March 21, 2005. Madhimalar is the daughter of late Dr S. Ramamurthy of Malar Hospitals, and his wife Dr Nithya Ramamurthy. Their first child, Naren, was born in January 2006.

    Muralitharan’s career has been beset with controversy; his bowling action called into question on a number of occasions by umpires and sections of the cricket community. After biomechanical studies in a lab, Muralitharan’s action was cleared by the International Cricket Council, first in 1996 and again in 1999. The legality of his doosra was first called into question in 2004. This delivery was found to exceed the ICC elbow extension limit of five degrees, assigned for spinners at that time. Based on of official studies into bowling actions, the International Cricket Council revised the elbow flexion limits applying to all bowlers in 2005. Muralitharan’s doosra falls within the revised limits.

    Muralitharan was left out of the one-day touring squad to West Indies in early 2008, leading to speculation that he may be focusing on test cricket in the future while Sri Lanka builds a younger squad for one day internationals.

    World records and achievements:

    Muttiah Muralitharan holds a number of world records, and several firsts:

  • The most Test wickets (723 wickets as of 22 December 2007).
  • The highest number of international wickets in Tests and ODIs combined (1187 wickets as of 19 March 2008).
  • The most 5-wicket hauls in an innings at Test level (63).
  • The most 10-wicket hauls in a match at Test level (20). He is the only player to take 10 wickets/match against every Test playing nation.
  • Fastest to 350, 400, 450, 500, 550, 600, 650 and 700 Test wickets, in terms of matches played.
  • Only player to take 10 wickets in a Test in four consecutive matches. Muralitharan has achieved this feat twice.
  • Only player to take 50 or more wickets against every Test playing nation.
  • Muralitharan and Jim Laker (England), are the only bowlers to have taken 9 wickets in a Test innings twice.
  • 7 wickets in an innings against the most countries (5).
  • Most Test wickets taken bowled (157), stumped (41) and caught & bowled (31).
  • Bowled by Muralitharan (b Muralitharan) is the most common dismissal in Test cricket (excluding run out).
  • Most successful bowler/fielder (non-wicket keeper) combination – c Mahela Jayawardene b Muttiah Muralitharan (65).
  • Most Man of the Series awards in Test cricket (11).
  • One of only six bowlers who have dismissed all the eleven batsmen in a Test match. Jim Laker, Srinivasaraghavan Venkataraghavan, Geoff Dymock, Abdul Qadir and Waqar Younis are the others.
  • Most test wickets in a single ground. Muralitharan is the only bowler to capture 100-plus Test wickets at two venues, the Sinhalese Sports Club Ground in Colombo and the Asgiriya Stadium in Kandy.
  • The only bowler to take 75 or more wickets in a calendar year on three occasions, achieving it in 2000, 2001 and 2006.

    See Also:

  • Wisden Leading Cricketer in the World
  • Doosra
  • List of international cricketers called for throwing
  • List of cricketers called for throwing in major cricket matches in Australia
  • Throwing (cricket)
  • List of World XI ODI cricketers
  • List of Asian XI ODI cricketers
  • World Cricket Tsunami Appeal
  • Muralitharan.com
  • CricInfo Player Profile: Muttiah Muralitharan
  • Muttiah Muralitharan International Fan Club
  • Alston Koch’s Murali Song Video
  • Murali Tracker
  • Muralitharan.cricket-records.com
  • Murali’s throwing controversy was resolved at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  • TimeLine: Muttiah Muralitharan
  • Muralitharan.org
  • Murali BigStarCricket

    Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Cricinfo.com, Wikipedia.com, Owners of video and pictures

  • Posted in முத்தையா முரளிதரன், Kandy, Murali, Muralitharan, Muttiah, Off Break, off spin, Sri Lanka, St Anthony's College, Tamil, Tamil Union Cricket and Athletic Club | Leave a Comment »

    Player Profile(#23)…Muttiah Muralitharan(Sri Lanka)

    Posted by wildkiwi25 on May 12, 2008

    Photobucket

    Photobucket

    Muttiah Muralitharan (Tamil: முத்தையா முரளிதரன் born 17 April 1972 in Kandy, Sri Lanka), often referred to as Murali, is a Sri Lankan cricketer who was rated the greatest Test-Match bowler ever by Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack in 2002.

    He is Test cricket’s highest wicket-taker, having overtaken the previous record-holder Shane Warne on December 3, 2007. Muralitharan had held the record before when he surpassed West Indies’ Courtney Walsh’s 519 wickets in 2004. But he suffered a shoulder injury later that year and was then overtaken by Warne. He is also second in the list of wicket-takers in One Day Internationals.

    Averaging over six wickets per Test, Muttiah Muralitharan is one of the most successful bowlers in the game and the greatest player in Sri Lanka’s history. He plays domestic cricket for the Tamil Union Cricket and Athletic Club, and county cricket for Lancashire as an overseas player.

    On 28 August 28, 1992 at the age of 20, Muralitharan made his debut against Australia at the Khettarama Stadium and claimed 3 for 141. Craig McDermott was his first Test wicket. His freakish action and his angular run-up showed that this was no run-of-the-mill spinner. During his first test, there was one dismissal which convinced many of Muralitharan’s special powers. Tom Moody’s leg-stump was dislodged when he shouldered arms to a delivery that pitched at least two feet outside the off-stump.

    The youthful Muralitharan went from strength to strength, playing a major part in Sri Lanka’s back-to-back Test victories against England and New Zealand in 1992-93. It was at this point in his career that he struck a close bond with his leader, mentor and one time business partner, the authoritative captain Arjuna Ranatunga. This relationship formed the bedrock of his success and meant that there were few doubts about his status as the team’s sole wicket-taker. Ranatunga was thoroughly convinced that Muralitharan’s precocious talent would signal a new era in Sri Lanka’s short Test history.

    In August 1993 at Moratuwa, Muralitharan captured 5 for 104 in South Africa’s first innings, his first five-wicket haul in Tests. His wickets include Kepler Wessels, Hansie Cronje and Jonty Rhodes.

    Muralitharan has continued to baffle batsman outside the shores of Sri Lanka, irrespective of the team’s performance. In Sri Lanka’s humiliating drubbing at the hands of India in 1993-94, where all three Tests were innings defeats, Muralitharan was the sole success, with 12 wickets in the rubber. His perseverance in the face of some astronomical scores by the fearsome quartet of Mohammed Azharuddin, Sachin Tendulkar, Navjot Sidhu and Vinod Kambli was in sharp contrast to the submission with which his team-mates played the series.

    It was in New Zealand in March 1995 that Muralitharan displayed his qualities as a match-winner on any surface. In Sri Lanka’s first triumph on foreign soil, Muralitharan confused the crease-bound New Zealanders on a grassy pitch in Dunedin. The Sri Lankan manager Duleep Mendis’ claim that Muralitharan can turn the ball on concrete was confirmed. On the eve of his tour of Pakistan later that year, doubts were cast on his ability to trouble subcontinental batsmen. By taking 19 wickets in the series and delivering a historic 2-1 victory, the off-spinner silenced the doubters. The Pakistanis, who had negotiated Warne’s leg-breaks in the previous home series, were never at ease against him.

    Prior to the eventful boxing day test of 1995, Muralitharan had captured 80 wickets in 22 tests at an unflattering average of 32.74. Even at that point in his career he was the leading wicket taker for Sri Lanka having gone past Rumesh Ratnayake’s aggregate of 73 wickets.

    Muttiah Muralitharan is a Sri Lankan Tamil of Indian origin. His paternal grandfather Periyasamy Sinasamy came from South India to work in the tea plantations of central Sri Lanka in 1920. He later returned to India with his daughters and settled in Tiruchirapalli. However his sons, including Muralitharan’s father remained in Sri Lanka.

    Muralitharan was born in the village of Nattarampotha in Kundasale (near Kandy), as the eldest of the four sons to Sinnasamy Muttiah and Lakshmi. Muralitharan’s father Sinnasamy Muttiah, runs a successful biscuit-making business.

    When he was nine years old Muralitharan was sent to St.Anthony’s College, Kandy, a private school run by Benedictine monks. He began his cricketing career as a medium pace bowler, but on the advice of his school coach, Sunil Fernando, he took up off spin when he was fourteen years old. He soon impressed and went on to play for four years in the school First XI. In those days he played as an all rounder and batted in the middle order. In his final two seasons at St Anthony’s college he took over one hundred wickets and in 1990/1 was named as the ‘Bata Schoolboy Cricketer of the Year’.

    After leaving school, he joined Tamil Union Cricket and Athletic Club and was selected for the Sri Lanka A tour of England in 1991. He played in five games but failed to capture a single wicket. On his return to Sri Lanka he impressed against Allan Border’s Australian team in a practice game and then went on to make his test debut at R. Premadasa Stadium in the Second Test Match of the series.[20]

    When his grandfather died at the age of 104, in July 2004, Muralitharan returned home from a tour of India to attend his funeral. Periyasamy Sinasamy’s first wish to see Muralitharan claiming the world record for the most Test wickets was realised (passing the record set by Courtney Walsh), but not his desire to live to see his grandson married. Muralitharan’s grandmother had passed away one month earlier at the age of 97. Muralitharan’s manager, Kushil Gunasekera stated that “Murali’s family is closely knit and united. They respect traditional values. The late grandfather enjoyed a great relationship with Murali.”[21]

    Muralitharan, married Madhimalar Ramamurthy, an Indian national, on March 21, 2005. Madhimalar is the daughter of late Dr S. Ramamurthy of Malar Hospitals, and his wife Dr Nithya Ramamurthy. Their first child, Naren, was born in January 2006.

    Muralitharan’s career has been beset with controversy; his bowling action called into question on a number of occasions by umpires and sections of the cricket community. After biomechanical studies in a lab, Muralitharan’s action was cleared by the International Cricket Council, first in 1996 and again in 1999. The legality of his doosra was first called into question in 2004. This delivery was found to exceed the ICC elbow extension limit of five degrees, assigned for spinners at that time. Based on of official studies into bowling actions, the International Cricket Council revised the elbow flexion limits applying to all bowlers in 2005. Muralitharan’s doosra falls within the revised limits.

    Muralitharan was left out of the one-day touring squad to West Indies in early 2008, leading to speculation that he may be focusing on test cricket in the future while Sri Lanka builds a younger squad for one day internationals.

    World records and achievements:

    Muttiah Muralitharan holds a number of world records, and several firsts:

  • The most Test wickets (723 wickets as of 22 December 2007).
  • The highest number of international wickets in Tests and ODIs combined (1187 wickets as of 19 March 2008).
  • The most 5-wicket hauls in an innings at Test level (63).
  • The most 10-wicket hauls in a match at Test level (20). He is the only player to take 10 wickets/match against every Test playing nation.
  • Fastest to 350, 400, 450, 500, 550, 600, 650 and 700 Test wickets, in terms of matches played.
  • Only player to take 10 wickets in a Test in four consecutive matches. Muralitharan has achieved this feat twice.
  • Only player to take 50 or more wickets against every Test playing nation.
  • Muralitharan and Jim Laker (England), are the only bowlers to have taken 9 wickets in a Test innings twice.
  • 7 wickets in an innings against the most countries (5).
  • Most Test wickets taken bowled (157), stumped (41) and caught & bowled (31).
  • Bowled by Muralitharan (b Muralitharan) is the most common dismissal in Test cricket (excluding run out).
  • Most successful bowler/fielder (non-wicket keeper) combination – c Mahela Jayawardene b Muttiah Muralitharan (65).
  • Most Man of the Series awards in Test cricket (11).
  • One of only six bowlers who have dismissed all the eleven batsmen in a Test match. Jim Laker, Srinivasaraghavan Venkataraghavan, Geoff Dymock, Abdul Qadir and Waqar Younis are the others.
  • Most test wickets in a single ground. Muralitharan is the only bowler to capture 100-plus Test wickets at two venues, the Sinhalese Sports Club Ground in Colombo and the Asgiriya Stadium in Kandy.
  • The only bowler to take 75 or more wickets in a calendar year on three occasions, achieving it in 2000, 2001 and 2006.

    See Also:

  • Wisden Leading Cricketer in the World
  • Doosra
  • List of international cricketers called for throwing
  • List of cricketers called for throwing in major cricket matches in Australia
  • Throwing (cricket)
  • List of World XI ODI cricketers
  • List of Asian XI ODI cricketers
  • World Cricket Tsunami Appeal
  • Muralitharan.com
  • CricInfo Player Profile: Muttiah Muralitharan
  • Muttiah Muralitharan International Fan Club
  • Alston Koch’s Murali Song Video
  • Murali Tracker
  • Muralitharan.cricket-records.com
  • Murali’s throwing controversy was resolved at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  • TimeLine: Muttiah Muralitharan
  • Muralitharan.org
  • Murali BigStarCricket
  • Photobucket

    *Acknowledgements to Cricinfo.com, Wikipedia.com, Owners of video and pictures

    Posted in முத்தையா முரளிதரன், Kandy, Murali, Muralitharan, Muttiah, Off Break, off spin, Sri Lanka, St Anthony's College, Tamil, Tamil Union Cricket and Athletic Club | Leave a Comment »